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Verses In Vox

Porchlight Family Media

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Verses In Vox
Verses In Vox

Verses In Vox

Porchlight Family Media

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Verses In Vox™ is a short-form audio program featuring dramatic readings of classic poetry. It's a vehicle to experience these well-loved works in a new way while at the same time introducing them to a new audience.

Latest Episodes

“Excelsior” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote the poem "Excelsior" in the early morning hours of September 28, 1841, and it was published for the first time in a periodical four months later. Excelsior is a Latin word which loosely translated means "ever upward" or "always higher". With that in mind, this poem could be interpreted as a sort of allegory on perseverance and always striving against the odds, or alternatively, blindly following your own desires without heeding the advice and counsel of others. Either way you choose to read the piece, it is beautifully written with lots of vivid imagery as the narrative unfolds.Full notes: https://verses.porchlightfamilymedia.com/2019/05/excelsior-by-henry-wadsworth-longfellow.html

3 MINMAY 5
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“Excelsior” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“Christmas At Sea” by Robert Louis Stevenson

First published in a periodical just a few days before Christmas in 1888, "Christmas at Sea" is a vivid narrative poem that pulls the reader into the scenes. The stark contrast between the warm, domestic scene and the freezing weather onboard the ship is very poignant and is the most interesting part of the piece to me. While the Scottish writer is known more for his novels, he also wrote three volumes of poetry with the first one, A Child's Garden of Verses, being the most known to casual poetry fans.

3 MIN2018 DEC 23
Comments
“Christmas At Sea” by Robert Louis Stevenson

"In School-days" by John Greenleaf Whittier

Born in rural Massachusetts in 1807, John Greenleaf Whittier began to write poetry at a young age with his first poem being published in the summer of 1826. Shortly thereafter, he began working as an editor of various periodicals. The poem "In School-days" was written in 1869 and Whittier may have drawn a bit on his own experience as a teacher in a one-room schoolhouse. The poem was praised by the public as well as by other poets with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow commenting, "There is something more in education than is set down in the school-books. Whittier has touched this point very poetically in that little lyric of his." Oliver Wendell Holmes said of the poem in a letter to Whittier, "...I had no sooner read them [the lines] that I fell into such ecstasy that I could hardly find words too high-colored to speak of them to my little household. I hardly think I dared read them aloud. My eyes fill with tears just looking at them in my scrapbook, now, while I am writing."Full notes: h...

2 MIN2018 NOV 29
Comments
"In School-days" by John Greenleaf Whittier

"O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman

Probably the most well-known poem by Walt Whitman, "O Captain! My Captain!" is a moving metaphor for President Abraham Lincoln's leadership of the country during the Civil War and his assassination which shocked the nation. This poem is actually only one of a handful that Whitman wrote in honor of Lincoln, whom he greatly admired. "O Captain" was written in 1865 shortly after the death of the President and was published later the same year in a small booklet containing a collection of 18 of Whitman's poems.Complete notes: https://verses.porchlightfamilymedia.com/2018/04/o-captain-my-captain-by-walt-whitman.html

2 MIN2018 APR 20
Comments
"O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman

"The Crucifixion and Resurrection. An Ode." by Mary Leapor

Mary Leapor was a young poet born into Britain's working class. She died at the young age of 24 and therefore her body of work is not very large, but it contains some lengthy pieces which are quite respected and have received much acclaim to this day. Published posthumously in 1748, "The Crucifixion and Resurrection. An Ode." is a beautiful and vivid depiction of Christ's death, burial, and resurrection. Leapor recounts this event in her signature style and the poem's first three stanzas seem to focus on the effect Jesus' death had on the natural world and then in the second half she shifts to show what His resurrection means to humanity.

2 MIN2018 MAR 29
Comments
"The Crucifixion and Resurrection. An Ode." by Mary Leapor

“Eldorado” by Edgar Allan Poe

The poem "Eldorado" was first published in 1849 in the Boston-based periodical, The Flag of Our Union, a publication which also printed works from Louisa May Alcott. Incidentally, this poem was published just a little over five months before Edgar Allan Poe would meet his untimely–and still unexplained–death. Poe is, of course, known for his melancholy and dark writings and although there are some gray undertones in "Eldorado", they are far less overt than those in many of his other pieces. The text of the poem has been set to music in its entirety as well as adapted into song by many musical acts over the years.

1 MIN2018 FEB 21
Comments
“Eldorado” by Edgar Allan Poe

"Autumn Fires" by Robert Louis Stevenson

"Autumn Fires" was first published in 1885 in a volume titled Penny Whistles which contained over 60 poems, including "My Shadow", "The Lamplighter", and "The Land of Story-books". The collection was later re-titled A Child’s Garden of Verses and has been reprinted many times. Robert Louis Stevenson is, of course, well-known for his short stories and novels, such as the pirate adventure story, Treasure Island, which was published two years prior to the aforementioned poetry collection.

1 MIN2017 NOV 23
Comments
"Autumn Fires" by Robert Louis Stevenson

“Afternoon” by Emma Lazarus

While she wrote dozens of poems, Emma Lazarus is most known for "The New Colossus" and information about much of her other work is scarce. Indeed, information regarding "Afternoon" is almost nonexistent online. This beautiful, narrative piece is filled with vivid visuals that draw the reader into the scene. It takes very little effort to feel as though one is walking alongside the unnamed "her" in the poem. Whether the woman Lazarus refers to is herself or if it is a more general usage of the pronoun we may never know. Regardless this is a wonderful poem which conveys an emotion that most of us can relate to in some way.

2 MIN2017 OCT 16
Comments
“Afternoon” by Emma Lazarus

"The New Colossus" by Emma Lazarus

American born, Jewish poet, Emma Lazarus wrote this now famous sonnet in 1883 for the purpose of aiding theBartholdi Pedestal Fund for the Statue of Liberty as Lazarus notes on the original manuscript of thepoem (pictured below). Unfortunately, she never saw the poem enshrined on Liberty Island as the plaque bearing the poem's text was not affixed to thepedestal wall until 1903; over a decade and a half after Lazarus' death in 1887. The title of the poem is a reference to the Colossus of Rhodes, a statue of the Greek sun-god, which was one of the7 Wonders of the Ancient World.

1 MIN2017 SEP 1
Comments
"The New Colossus" by Emma Lazarus

“A Psalm of Life" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

This popular poem by American poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, was firstpublished in theliterarymagazine,The Knickerbocker, in 1838. The following year, this poem was collected with several other early Longfellow works and published in a volume titled Voices of the Night. Longfellow revisits the idea of likening poems to psalmsas well as other themes from“A Psalm of Life" in subsequent works on several otheroccasions, including one entitled"The Reaper and the Flowers" which was originally subtitled "A Psalm of Death".

2 MIN2017 JUL 27
Comments
“A Psalm of Life" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Latest Episodes

“Excelsior” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow wrote the poem "Excelsior" in the early morning hours of September 28, 1841, and it was published for the first time in a periodical four months later. Excelsior is a Latin word which loosely translated means "ever upward" or "always higher". With that in mind, this poem could be interpreted as a sort of allegory on perseverance and always striving against the odds, or alternatively, blindly following your own desires without heeding the advice and counsel of others. Either way you choose to read the piece, it is beautifully written with lots of vivid imagery as the narrative unfolds.Full notes: https://verses.porchlightfamilymedia.com/2019/05/excelsior-by-henry-wadsworth-longfellow.html

3 MINMAY 5
Comments
“Excelsior” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“Christmas At Sea” by Robert Louis Stevenson

First published in a periodical just a few days before Christmas in 1888, "Christmas at Sea" is a vivid narrative poem that pulls the reader into the scenes. The stark contrast between the warm, domestic scene and the freezing weather onboard the ship is very poignant and is the most interesting part of the piece to me. While the Scottish writer is known more for his novels, he also wrote three volumes of poetry with the first one, A Child's Garden of Verses, being the most known to casual poetry fans.

3 MIN2018 DEC 23
Comments
“Christmas At Sea” by Robert Louis Stevenson

"In School-days" by John Greenleaf Whittier

Born in rural Massachusetts in 1807, John Greenleaf Whittier began to write poetry at a young age with his first poem being published in the summer of 1826. Shortly thereafter, he began working as an editor of various periodicals. The poem "In School-days" was written in 1869 and Whittier may have drawn a bit on his own experience as a teacher in a one-room schoolhouse. The poem was praised by the public as well as by other poets with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow commenting, "There is something more in education than is set down in the school-books. Whittier has touched this point very poetically in that little lyric of his." Oliver Wendell Holmes said of the poem in a letter to Whittier, "...I had no sooner read them [the lines] that I fell into such ecstasy that I could hardly find words too high-colored to speak of them to my little household. I hardly think I dared read them aloud. My eyes fill with tears just looking at them in my scrapbook, now, while I am writing."Full notes: h...

2 MIN2018 NOV 29
Comments
"In School-days" by John Greenleaf Whittier

"O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman

Probably the most well-known poem by Walt Whitman, "O Captain! My Captain!" is a moving metaphor for President Abraham Lincoln's leadership of the country during the Civil War and his assassination which shocked the nation. This poem is actually only one of a handful that Whitman wrote in honor of Lincoln, whom he greatly admired. "O Captain" was written in 1865 shortly after the death of the President and was published later the same year in a small booklet containing a collection of 18 of Whitman's poems.Complete notes: https://verses.porchlightfamilymedia.com/2018/04/o-captain-my-captain-by-walt-whitman.html

2 MIN2018 APR 20
Comments
"O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman

"The Crucifixion and Resurrection. An Ode." by Mary Leapor

Mary Leapor was a young poet born into Britain's working class. She died at the young age of 24 and therefore her body of work is not very large, but it contains some lengthy pieces which are quite respected and have received much acclaim to this day. Published posthumously in 1748, "The Crucifixion and Resurrection. An Ode." is a beautiful and vivid depiction of Christ's death, burial, and resurrection. Leapor recounts this event in her signature style and the poem's first three stanzas seem to focus on the effect Jesus' death had on the natural world and then in the second half she shifts to show what His resurrection means to humanity.

2 MIN2018 MAR 29
Comments
"The Crucifixion and Resurrection. An Ode." by Mary Leapor

“Eldorado” by Edgar Allan Poe

The poem "Eldorado" was first published in 1849 in the Boston-based periodical, The Flag of Our Union, a publication which also printed works from Louisa May Alcott. Incidentally, this poem was published just a little over five months before Edgar Allan Poe would meet his untimely–and still unexplained–death. Poe is, of course, known for his melancholy and dark writings and although there are some gray undertones in "Eldorado", they are far less overt than those in many of his other pieces. The text of the poem has been set to music in its entirety as well as adapted into song by many musical acts over the years.

1 MIN2018 FEB 21
Comments
“Eldorado” by Edgar Allan Poe

"Autumn Fires" by Robert Louis Stevenson

"Autumn Fires" was first published in 1885 in a volume titled Penny Whistles which contained over 60 poems, including "My Shadow", "The Lamplighter", and "The Land of Story-books". The collection was later re-titled A Child’s Garden of Verses and has been reprinted many times. Robert Louis Stevenson is, of course, well-known for his short stories and novels, such as the pirate adventure story, Treasure Island, which was published two years prior to the aforementioned poetry collection.

1 MIN2017 NOV 23
Comments
"Autumn Fires" by Robert Louis Stevenson

“Afternoon” by Emma Lazarus

While she wrote dozens of poems, Emma Lazarus is most known for "The New Colossus" and information about much of her other work is scarce. Indeed, information regarding "Afternoon" is almost nonexistent online. This beautiful, narrative piece is filled with vivid visuals that draw the reader into the scene. It takes very little effort to feel as though one is walking alongside the unnamed "her" in the poem. Whether the woman Lazarus refers to is herself or if it is a more general usage of the pronoun we may never know. Regardless this is a wonderful poem which conveys an emotion that most of us can relate to in some way.

2 MIN2017 OCT 16
Comments
“Afternoon” by Emma Lazarus

"The New Colossus" by Emma Lazarus

American born, Jewish poet, Emma Lazarus wrote this now famous sonnet in 1883 for the purpose of aiding theBartholdi Pedestal Fund for the Statue of Liberty as Lazarus notes on the original manuscript of thepoem (pictured below). Unfortunately, she never saw the poem enshrined on Liberty Island as the plaque bearing the poem's text was not affixed to thepedestal wall until 1903; over a decade and a half after Lazarus' death in 1887. The title of the poem is a reference to the Colossus of Rhodes, a statue of the Greek sun-god, which was one of the7 Wonders of the Ancient World.

1 MIN2017 SEP 1
Comments
"The New Colossus" by Emma Lazarus

“A Psalm of Life" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

This popular poem by American poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, was firstpublished in theliterarymagazine,The Knickerbocker, in 1838. The following year, this poem was collected with several other early Longfellow works and published in a volume titled Voices of the Night. Longfellow revisits the idea of likening poems to psalmsas well as other themes from“A Psalm of Life" in subsequent works on several otheroccasions, including one entitled"The Reaper and the Flowers" which was originally subtitled "A Psalm of Death".

2 MIN2017 JUL 27
Comments
“A Psalm of Life" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow