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LiveDeep NOW
LiveDeep NOW

LiveDeep NOW

Ericson AF Proper

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Ancient Wisdom for Modern Living

Latest Episodes

Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [4]

In this episode we examine the Four Four Noble Path in relation to emotions. Reactive emotions are the inevitable human response to suffering, in particular as a defensive mechanism to reinforce the notion of a separate, individual "self". The Buddha in first teaching relayed his enlightenment insight simply as "I teach suffering and the end of suffering". In the Four Fold Noble Truths he 1) identifies the problem: suffering, 2) points out the root cause of suffering: emotional reaction from habituated patterns, 3) offers the solution to suffering: disassembling the conditioning that underlies the misperception of self and other, and 4) offers a way to effectively implement the solution: a way of freedom from conditioned response known as the Eightfold Noble Path.

46 MIN2011 MAR 25
Comments
Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [4]

Tonglen: Opening the Heart

Tonglen — the practice of "giving" (Tib. tong) and "receiving" (Tib. len) is part of the instruction on "mind training" (Tib. lojong) brought to Tibet by Atisha. Put simply, the practice of tonglen is to take on the suffering and pain of others, and give them your happiness, well-being and peace of mind. In training as a bodhisattva, we attempt to be as human and natural as possible, rather than hide from or avoid ourselves or overly interpret reality. Our goal is to be with things as they are. This podcast is dedicated to the people of Japan as they live in the midst of national and personal tragedy.

30 MIN2011 MAR 18
Comments
Tonglen: Opening the Heart

Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [3]

Shutdown triggers are excellent teachers on the path to emotional freedom. Triggers point to the underlying defensive mechanisms which keep us from creating the space to "experience" our feelings. With repeated practice, we become comfortable in spacious awareness and emotionally reactivity begins to more spontaneously release and resolve.

38 MIN2011 MAR 11
Comments
Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [3]

Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [2]

In learning to feel, we must bring attention to the arising of feeling. Once we can identify the arising of feeling, we can consciously create the space to engage it before our natural "shutdown" patterns take over. During the included exercise, you are invited to begin the discovery of the "feeling terrain" of your inner landscape and led to experience feeling as a bodily sensation. Additionally, the difference between feeling and emotion is explored.

35 MIN2011 MAR 4
Comments
Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [2]

Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [1]

The path of Buddhism begins by acknowledging the pervasive truth of suffering, not passively as mental concept but actively as lived experience. Yet for many this painful prospect may lead to complete avoidance of messy, raw and emotional aspects of being human in favor of a more "spiritual" approach, even using spiritual practice as a defense mechanism. John Welwood coined the term "spiritual bypassing" to describe this process. However without recognizing and opening to this vulnerable space, what Chogyam Trungpa calls the "soft spot", one further entrenches negative behavior patterns and emotionally reactivity. By learning to feel — honestly, rawly and nakedly — we become fully human, emotionally mature and authentically open to our awakened nature, both pure and spacious.

32 MIN2011 FEB 25
Comments
Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [1]

Fortunate Joy: The Blessing of Being

Buddhism speaks frequently of the "preciousness of human life." The blessing of being alive, of being human, is to uncover and become reacquainted with our basic nature—sane, aware, empty and luminous. We are indeed fortunate to not only find the teachers who embody the Dharma and selflessly impart their understanding and realization, but provide each of us with the tools, space and experiences to accomplish this for ourselves. When we touch this awareness with appreciation and gratitude, we awaken to spontaneous joy and happiness.

38 MIN2011 FEB 11
Comments
Fortunate Joy: The Blessing of Being

Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [6: Wisdom]

The last paramita, transcendant wisdom (Sherab, Tib.; Prajna, Skt.), is the highest form of knowing beyond dualistic thought and conceptions. It is the sword of truth which cuts through our fabrications, delusions and negative emotions. Prajna reveals the purity of everything "as it is" and the inherent radiant nature of mind. By integrating the practice of the six paramitas into our lives, based in bodhicitta, we benefit all beings and perfect the accumulations of wisdom and merit.

26 MIN2011 FEB 4
Comments
Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [6: Wisdom]

Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [5: Meditative Concentration]

The paramita of meditative concentration (samten), the fifth of the six paramitas, is defined as the capacity to remain undistracted. When we remain one-pointed and committed to give up mundane concerns and let go of discursive conceptual thought, we overcome agitation. Through the practice of mediation, this paramita arises and cultivates the space for understanding the true nature of reality which is the sixth and final perfection: prajna paramita.

40 MIN2011 JAN 28
Comments
Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [5: Meditative Concentration]

Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [4: Joyful Effort]

The paramita of joyful effort (tsondru) is also translated as exertion, determination or perseverance. This perfection is the antidote to laziness. In cultivating action bodhicitta, we tirelessly train in dismantling the negative reactive patterns of the Three Poisons (aversion, attachment and indifference) to release the inherent positive wisdom energy contained within. By starting with and accomplishing the small, we are able to expand our reach to the the fruition of completely enlightened activity.

33 MIN2011 JAN 21
Comments
Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [4: Joyful Effort]

Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [3: Patience]

This podcast focuses on the prime paramita of patience (sopa) which is also translated as tolerance, forbearance or inclusiveness. This perfection is the antidote to anger. In practicing mindfulness with small frustrations and aversion to our experience, we create the space to examine the nature of phenomena and our reaction to it. As Thich Nhat Hahn states, this "inclusiveness is the capacity to receive, embrace and transform." When patience is nurtured through meditation and applied to engaging the world, we create a heart wide enough to embrace the universe.

32 MIN2011 JAN 15
Comments
Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [3: Patience]

Latest Episodes

Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [4]

In this episode we examine the Four Four Noble Path in relation to emotions. Reactive emotions are the inevitable human response to suffering, in particular as a defensive mechanism to reinforce the notion of a separate, individual "self". The Buddha in first teaching relayed his enlightenment insight simply as "I teach suffering and the end of suffering". In the Four Fold Noble Truths he 1) identifies the problem: suffering, 2) points out the root cause of suffering: emotional reaction from habituated patterns, 3) offers the solution to suffering: disassembling the conditioning that underlies the misperception of self and other, and 4) offers a way to effectively implement the solution: a way of freedom from conditioned response known as the Eightfold Noble Path.

46 MIN2011 MAR 25
Comments
Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [4]

Tonglen: Opening the Heart

Tonglen — the practice of "giving" (Tib. tong) and "receiving" (Tib. len) is part of the instruction on "mind training" (Tib. lojong) brought to Tibet by Atisha. Put simply, the practice of tonglen is to take on the suffering and pain of others, and give them your happiness, well-being and peace of mind. In training as a bodhisattva, we attempt to be as human and natural as possible, rather than hide from or avoid ourselves or overly interpret reality. Our goal is to be with things as they are. This podcast is dedicated to the people of Japan as they live in the midst of national and personal tragedy.

30 MIN2011 MAR 18
Comments
Tonglen: Opening the Heart

Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [3]

Shutdown triggers are excellent teachers on the path to emotional freedom. Triggers point to the underlying defensive mechanisms which keep us from creating the space to "experience" our feelings. With repeated practice, we become comfortable in spacious awareness and emotionally reactivity begins to more spontaneously release and resolve.

38 MIN2011 MAR 11
Comments
Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [3]

Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [2]

In learning to feel, we must bring attention to the arising of feeling. Once we can identify the arising of feeling, we can consciously create the space to engage it before our natural "shutdown" patterns take over. During the included exercise, you are invited to begin the discovery of the "feeling terrain" of your inner landscape and led to experience feeling as a bodily sensation. Additionally, the difference between feeling and emotion is explored.

35 MIN2011 MAR 4
Comments
Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [2]

Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [1]

The path of Buddhism begins by acknowledging the pervasive truth of suffering, not passively as mental concept but actively as lived experience. Yet for many this painful prospect may lead to complete avoidance of messy, raw and emotional aspects of being human in favor of a more "spiritual" approach, even using spiritual practice as a defense mechanism. John Welwood coined the term "spiritual bypassing" to describe this process. However without recognizing and opening to this vulnerable space, what Chogyam Trungpa calls the "soft spot", one further entrenches negative behavior patterns and emotionally reactivity. By learning to feel — honestly, rawly and nakedly — we become fully human, emotionally mature and authentically open to our awakened nature, both pure and spacious.

32 MIN2011 FEB 25
Comments
Opening the Gate: Finding Freedom in Feeling [1]

Fortunate Joy: The Blessing of Being

Buddhism speaks frequently of the "preciousness of human life." The blessing of being alive, of being human, is to uncover and become reacquainted with our basic nature—sane, aware, empty and luminous. We are indeed fortunate to not only find the teachers who embody the Dharma and selflessly impart their understanding and realization, but provide each of us with the tools, space and experiences to accomplish this for ourselves. When we touch this awareness with appreciation and gratitude, we awaken to spontaneous joy and happiness.

38 MIN2011 FEB 11
Comments
Fortunate Joy: The Blessing of Being

Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [6: Wisdom]

The last paramita, transcendant wisdom (Sherab, Tib.; Prajna, Skt.), is the highest form of knowing beyond dualistic thought and conceptions. It is the sword of truth which cuts through our fabrications, delusions and negative emotions. Prajna reveals the purity of everything "as it is" and the inherent radiant nature of mind. By integrating the practice of the six paramitas into our lives, based in bodhicitta, we benefit all beings and perfect the accumulations of wisdom and merit.

26 MIN2011 FEB 4
Comments
Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [6: Wisdom]

Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [5: Meditative Concentration]

The paramita of meditative concentration (samten), the fifth of the six paramitas, is defined as the capacity to remain undistracted. When we remain one-pointed and committed to give up mundane concerns and let go of discursive conceptual thought, we overcome agitation. Through the practice of mediation, this paramita arises and cultivates the space for understanding the true nature of reality which is the sixth and final perfection: prajna paramita.

40 MIN2011 JAN 28
Comments
Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [5: Meditative Concentration]

Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [4: Joyful Effort]

The paramita of joyful effort (tsondru) is also translated as exertion, determination or perseverance. This perfection is the antidote to laziness. In cultivating action bodhicitta, we tirelessly train in dismantling the negative reactive patterns of the Three Poisons (aversion, attachment and indifference) to release the inherent positive wisdom energy contained within. By starting with and accomplishing the small, we are able to expand our reach to the the fruition of completely enlightened activity.

33 MIN2011 JAN 21
Comments
Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [4: Joyful Effort]

Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [3: Patience]

This podcast focuses on the prime paramita of patience (sopa) which is also translated as tolerance, forbearance or inclusiveness. This perfection is the antidote to anger. In practicing mindfulness with small frustrations and aversion to our experience, we create the space to examine the nature of phenomena and our reaction to it. As Thich Nhat Hahn states, this "inclusiveness is the capacity to receive, embrace and transform." When patience is nurtured through meditation and applied to engaging the world, we create a heart wide enough to embrace the universe.

32 MIN2011 JAN 15
Comments
Engaging the World: The Six Paramitas [3: Patience]