title

Business for Good Podcast

Paul Shapiro

0
Followers
0
Plays
Business for Good Podcast

Business for Good Podcast

Paul Shapiro

0
Followers
0
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Join host Paul Shapiro as he talks with some of the leading start-up entrepreneurs and titans of industry alike using their businesses to help solve the world’s most pressing problems.

Latest Episodes

Real Leather without the Cows: Provenance Bio Comes Out of Stealth Mode

How do people with ideas for businesses to save the world find cofounders? If you’re fashion designer Michalyn Andrews, you read journal articles by scientists doing awesome things in biotech, cold-email them to ask them to meet up, and make the proposal at a Starbucks. Her dream: to make real leather from cows to lighten the burden we’re placing on animals and the planet. She and her new cofounder spent the next two years in stealth mode, researching, developing, patenting, and quietly raising a million dollars. They’ve been quiet...until now. Provenance Bio is now coming out of the shadows and is ready to start talking about its big plans to keep people wearing leather, but instead of it coming off the backs of cows, they’re leaving those cows out to pasture and making real leather, animal-free. So enjoy the story in this episode of how this early-stage company got founded, raised seven figures of cash, and is now working to scale up and get into the business of doing good. Discussed in this episode Books Michalyn recommends: Blue Ocean Strategy and Blue Ocean Shift The world’s first clean leather-bound book.

36 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Real Leather without the Cows: Provenance Bio Comes Out of Stealth Mode

From ConAgra to Culturing Fish Cells

Lou Cooperhouse’s Career 180 Seeks to Turn the Tide for Our Oceans

48 MIN2 w ago
Comments
From ConAgra to Culturing Fish Cells

Can Beer Brewery Waste Help Solve Plastic Pollution? Lori Goff is Betting On It

Plastic is amazing at doing so many things—except going away. As the planet increasingly swims in humanity’s plastic garbage (nearly none of which gets recycled and virtually all of which will last for centuries), Lori Goff is betting that biotech will be part of the solution to creating functional plastic alternatives that are so biodegradable you can eat them. As you’ll hear, Lori is using the waste water from beer brewery waste, subjecting it to a specific type of fermentation, and then creating an alternative to plastic wrappers. Her company has been personally bootstrapped until recently, when she started winning governmental grants in the EU. Lori is already making her wrappers, made of a material she calls Unplastic, and her goal is to start selling them to companies as an alternative to their plastic wrappers in 2020. While wrappers are the low-hanging fruit, her company Outlander Materials has its eyes on other applications as well. This is just one more way that when sc...

38 MIN2019 DEC 15
Comments
Can Beer Brewery Waste Help Solve Plastic Pollution? Lori Goff is Betting On It

Bean-Free Brew: A Perfect Cup of Coffee down to the Last Molecule

In the 29 previous episodes of this show you’ve heard about pork without pigs, milk without cows, diamonds without mining, and even wood without trees. Well, on this 30th episode, we’re exploring the brave new world of coffee without the bean. Turns out that there’s a lot of deforestation for coffee growing, and climate change is making the situation worse. In fact, experts predict that the amount of land suitable for growing coffee is expected to shrink by an estimated 50% by 2050. But, what if you could make coffee out of agricultural byproducts, like watermelon seeds and sunflower seed husks? Think it wouldn’t taste as good? Well, according to a Seattle-based startup called Atomo, they’ve not only recreated the exact taste of coffee, but they go on to claim that in blind taste tests of their brew vs. Starbucks, 7 out of 10 people preferred the taste of their so-called molecular coffee. Company cofounders Andy Kleitsch and Jarret Stopforth began with a successful Kickstarter, giving them enough funds to do the food science necessary to crack the coffee code. After putting out a press release about their prototype, investors came calling, and literally within days they’d signed a terms sheet for $2.6M. Now, Atomo is brewing, making coffee in which they can precisely control the amount of caffeine, and much, much more. It’s a fascinating tale of one more way in which food tech innovation may help alleviate pressure we’re placing on the planet. So sit back and maybe enjoy a cup of coffee while listening, and know that that cup in the future may be even tastier for you and better for the planet. Books discussed in this episode Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why Taste: Surprising Stories and Science About Why Food Tastes Good Man’s Search for Meaning

38 MIN2019 DEC 1
Comments
Bean-Free Brew: A Perfect Cup of Coffee down to the Last Molecule

TurtleTree Labs: Google & Dairy Execs Search for an Alt-Dairy Revolution

What do you get when you combine a Google leader, a dairy industry executive, and an engineer? Apparently, if you’re in Singapore, you get a new startup producing real cow’s milk-- without the cow: TurtleTree Labs. Rather than trying to turn plants into milky beverages like many alt-dairy companies are, and rather than using yeast to make certain components of cow’s milk, like Perfect Day is doing, TurtleTree Labs is using bovine stem cells, expressing them as mammary glands, and producing whole cows’ milk that they claim is a 1:1 match for milk that was squeezed from an actual udder. The company got its start with three business-minded folks, including the former CFO of a well-known California dairy company called Clover Sonoma, thinking they were on to something. In fact, they’re so convinced that their idea and execution will be a winner that they’ve already filed for several patents and have even put half a million of their own dollars into their startup. So sit back and be inspired by their story as told by CEO Fengru Lin. Discussed in this episode Past Business for Good interviews: Perfect Day episode and Shiok Meats episode How scientists helped give diabetics real human insulin without using human donors. How cheese cheese consumption drives milk production, even when fluid milk consumption is down. The documentary series “Genius.” (It’s called American Genius for US viewers.)

36 MIN2019 NOV 15
Comments
TurtleTree Labs: Google & Dairy Execs Search for an Alt-Dairy Revolution

Bringing Power—Solar and Social—to Rural Africans, with Lyndsay Holley Handler

You’ve heard the folklore time and again: a group of young idealists starts a company in their garage with dreams of one day changing the world. In the case of Fenix International, they too started in a garage, but this garage happened to be in Uganda, and those idealists happened to be a group of ex-Apple engineers. The problem they were trying to solve: Lots of rural Africans just don’t have access to safe, clean energy. As a result, they either burn kerosene or local trees, both of which are polluting and create real hazards in the home, or they simply live in the dark when the sunsets. Well, these engineers wanted to be a source of light for such families, literally. Their goal: create the cheapest possible solar panels and energy storage that could be affixed to roofs, often made of thatch, and help power homes that are too far away from any grid. They called their company Fenix International, and Lyndsay Holley Handler, employee #1, would be their CEO. As you’ll hear in the interview, Fenix got right to work, raising capital and inventing low-cost solar panels that help transform the lives of their new owners. Not only do test scores for kids improve in homes with the solar panels (since they can study at night), but local entrepreneurs like tailors can receive more income by staying open later. There’s also evidence that these solar panels are helping advance gender equality and even lowering birth rates. With a profitable business model that’s tangibly improving the lives of rural Africans and employing 1,100 people, Fenix solar panels are now sitting atop hundreds of thousands of homes in six countries, benefiting three million people. Not too shabby for a company that began in a garage in 2009. The startup went through series A and B financings before more recently getting acquired by a larger energy company, allowing for some cofounder exits. This was recorded in October 2019, just a couple days after Lyndsay stepped down as CEO of Fenix. With such an impressive track record behind her, what will Lyndsay do next? Well, as the head of the Ugandan Ultimate Frisbee Association, maybe she’ll have a little more time to play. But then, she’s got new business plans to keep making a difference. Listen to the interview to hear her story! Mentioned in this episode Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose by Tony Hsieh

41 MIN2019 NOV 1
Comments
Bringing Power—Solar and Social—to Rural Africans, with Lyndsay Holley Handler

Your Trash Is Tom Szaky's Treasure

As a teenager, Tom Szaky, an immigrant whose family fled Hungary after the Chernobyl disaster, was concerned about all all the garbage we produce. Rather than starting a recycling club, he started a company. Today, TerraCycle has 300 employees and brings in nearly $50 million in annual revenue. Their goal, as the company touts, is to make “recycling the unrecyclable not only feasible but desirable and profitable!”

32 MIN2019 OCT 15
Comments
Your Trash Is Tom Szaky's Treasure

The Meat-Scientist-Turned-Plant-Based-Entrepreneur

Many of the people running plant-based and clean meat companies are vegetarians themselves who often have come out of the animal protection or environmental communities. Not Rody Hawkins. In this episode, listen to the unlikely story of a meat man who’s now on a mission to efficiently feed the world with plants.

42 MIN2019 OCT 1
Comments
The Meat-Scientist-Turned-Plant-Based-Entrepreneur

Ep 25: Can Helping the Homeless with Surplus Food be Profitable? Jasmine Crowe is Betting on It.

For a lot of people, when they walk by someone who’s homeless, their inclination may be to look the other way. One day for Jasmine Crowe, however, she not only didn’t look the other way; she saw a profitable business opportunity in helping connect the hungry with perfectly good food the rest of us are throwing away. Sound like a pipedream? Well, today many major food users, including the NFL, the Atlanta airport, and Netflix pay the startup Jasmine founded to take their unsold food and deliver it to the hungry. And it turns out, thanks to federal tax law, it’s profitable not only for Jasmine’s company, but for those corporations paying to have their unwanted food go to the homeless, too. So far, Jasmine’s company Goodr has diverted more than two million pounds of food from landfills and into the stomachs of the homeless—all profitably. In this episode, we talk with Jasmine about her business model and how it’s helping the hungry while protecting the planet at the same time. R...

31 MIN2019 SEP 15
Comments
Ep 25: Can Helping the Homeless with Surplus Food be Profitable? Jasmine Crowe is Betting on It.

Ep 24: How Often Should Workers be Paid? Safwan Shah Has an Idea

Should employers really make their employees wait two weeks to get paid? You may not think it’s that important, but imagine if you had less than $400 in your bank account right now. You might start wondering why, in today’s digital age, you have to wait 14 days to get paid for work you did two weeks ago. Well, our guest—a rocket scientist-turned fin-tech-entrepreneur—says there’s no reason employees should have to wait. It’s their money, Safwan Shah says, and they should have access to it on demand. And if they don’t, the employer is essentially using the employee as a source of credit for itself, and at zero interest no less. In addition to founding his own payroll-type company to address this problem—which incidentally recently raised a $20 million Series B round—Safwan wrote a fascinating book on the topic. His company, PayActiv, is now in business with the likes of major employers like Walmart and Uber, helping to fulfil what Safwan calls his life’s mission: to eliminate financial suffering of the neediest. In this episode, Safwan offers a history of why we have the two-week pay period in the first place, and even gets biblical on us, citing the thoughts of both Moses and Mohammed. Yes, it turns out they both prescribed that employers pay employees for their labor right away. So listen to Safwan drop some ancient and modern knowledge on using timely payroll to help the poorest among us. Discussed in this episode Safwan’s book, It's About TIME: How Businesses Can Save the World (One Worker at a Time) Safwan’s company, PayActiv

35 MIN2019 SEP 1
Comments
Ep 24: How Often Should Workers be Paid? Safwan Shah Has an Idea

Latest Episodes

Real Leather without the Cows: Provenance Bio Comes Out of Stealth Mode

How do people with ideas for businesses to save the world find cofounders? If you’re fashion designer Michalyn Andrews, you read journal articles by scientists doing awesome things in biotech, cold-email them to ask them to meet up, and make the proposal at a Starbucks. Her dream: to make real leather from cows to lighten the burden we’re placing on animals and the planet. She and her new cofounder spent the next two years in stealth mode, researching, developing, patenting, and quietly raising a million dollars. They’ve been quiet...until now. Provenance Bio is now coming out of the shadows and is ready to start talking about its big plans to keep people wearing leather, but instead of it coming off the backs of cows, they’re leaving those cows out to pasture and making real leather, animal-free. So enjoy the story in this episode of how this early-stage company got founded, raised seven figures of cash, and is now working to scale up and get into the business of doing good. Discussed in this episode Books Michalyn recommends: Blue Ocean Strategy and Blue Ocean Shift The world’s first clean leather-bound book.

36 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Real Leather without the Cows: Provenance Bio Comes Out of Stealth Mode

From ConAgra to Culturing Fish Cells

Lou Cooperhouse’s Career 180 Seeks to Turn the Tide for Our Oceans

48 MIN2 w ago
Comments
From ConAgra to Culturing Fish Cells

Can Beer Brewery Waste Help Solve Plastic Pollution? Lori Goff is Betting On It

Plastic is amazing at doing so many things—except going away. As the planet increasingly swims in humanity’s plastic garbage (nearly none of which gets recycled and virtually all of which will last for centuries), Lori Goff is betting that biotech will be part of the solution to creating functional plastic alternatives that are so biodegradable you can eat them. As you’ll hear, Lori is using the waste water from beer brewery waste, subjecting it to a specific type of fermentation, and then creating an alternative to plastic wrappers. Her company has been personally bootstrapped until recently, when she started winning governmental grants in the EU. Lori is already making her wrappers, made of a material she calls Unplastic, and her goal is to start selling them to companies as an alternative to their plastic wrappers in 2020. While wrappers are the low-hanging fruit, her company Outlander Materials has its eyes on other applications as well. This is just one more way that when sc...

38 MIN2019 DEC 15
Comments
Can Beer Brewery Waste Help Solve Plastic Pollution? Lori Goff is Betting On It

Bean-Free Brew: A Perfect Cup of Coffee down to the Last Molecule

In the 29 previous episodes of this show you’ve heard about pork without pigs, milk without cows, diamonds without mining, and even wood without trees. Well, on this 30th episode, we’re exploring the brave new world of coffee without the bean. Turns out that there’s a lot of deforestation for coffee growing, and climate change is making the situation worse. In fact, experts predict that the amount of land suitable for growing coffee is expected to shrink by an estimated 50% by 2050. But, what if you could make coffee out of agricultural byproducts, like watermelon seeds and sunflower seed husks? Think it wouldn’t taste as good? Well, according to a Seattle-based startup called Atomo, they’ve not only recreated the exact taste of coffee, but they go on to claim that in blind taste tests of their brew vs. Starbucks, 7 out of 10 people preferred the taste of their so-called molecular coffee. Company cofounders Andy Kleitsch and Jarret Stopforth began with a successful Kickstarter, giving them enough funds to do the food science necessary to crack the coffee code. After putting out a press release about their prototype, investors came calling, and literally within days they’d signed a terms sheet for $2.6M. Now, Atomo is brewing, making coffee in which they can precisely control the amount of caffeine, and much, much more. It’s a fascinating tale of one more way in which food tech innovation may help alleviate pressure we’re placing on the planet. So sit back and maybe enjoy a cup of coffee while listening, and know that that cup in the future may be even tastier for you and better for the planet. Books discussed in this episode Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why Taste: Surprising Stories and Science About Why Food Tastes Good Man’s Search for Meaning

38 MIN2019 DEC 1
Comments
Bean-Free Brew: A Perfect Cup of Coffee down to the Last Molecule

TurtleTree Labs: Google & Dairy Execs Search for an Alt-Dairy Revolution

What do you get when you combine a Google leader, a dairy industry executive, and an engineer? Apparently, if you’re in Singapore, you get a new startup producing real cow’s milk-- without the cow: TurtleTree Labs. Rather than trying to turn plants into milky beverages like many alt-dairy companies are, and rather than using yeast to make certain components of cow’s milk, like Perfect Day is doing, TurtleTree Labs is using bovine stem cells, expressing them as mammary glands, and producing whole cows’ milk that they claim is a 1:1 match for milk that was squeezed from an actual udder. The company got its start with three business-minded folks, including the former CFO of a well-known California dairy company called Clover Sonoma, thinking they were on to something. In fact, they’re so convinced that their idea and execution will be a winner that they’ve already filed for several patents and have even put half a million of their own dollars into their startup. So sit back and be inspired by their story as told by CEO Fengru Lin. Discussed in this episode Past Business for Good interviews: Perfect Day episode and Shiok Meats episode How scientists helped give diabetics real human insulin without using human donors. How cheese cheese consumption drives milk production, even when fluid milk consumption is down. The documentary series “Genius.” (It’s called American Genius for US viewers.)

36 MIN2019 NOV 15
Comments
TurtleTree Labs: Google & Dairy Execs Search for an Alt-Dairy Revolution

Bringing Power—Solar and Social—to Rural Africans, with Lyndsay Holley Handler

You’ve heard the folklore time and again: a group of young idealists starts a company in their garage with dreams of one day changing the world. In the case of Fenix International, they too started in a garage, but this garage happened to be in Uganda, and those idealists happened to be a group of ex-Apple engineers. The problem they were trying to solve: Lots of rural Africans just don’t have access to safe, clean energy. As a result, they either burn kerosene or local trees, both of which are polluting and create real hazards in the home, or they simply live in the dark when the sunsets. Well, these engineers wanted to be a source of light for such families, literally. Their goal: create the cheapest possible solar panels and energy storage that could be affixed to roofs, often made of thatch, and help power homes that are too far away from any grid. They called their company Fenix International, and Lyndsay Holley Handler, employee #1, would be their CEO. As you’ll hear in the interview, Fenix got right to work, raising capital and inventing low-cost solar panels that help transform the lives of their new owners. Not only do test scores for kids improve in homes with the solar panels (since they can study at night), but local entrepreneurs like tailors can receive more income by staying open later. There’s also evidence that these solar panels are helping advance gender equality and even lowering birth rates. With a profitable business model that’s tangibly improving the lives of rural Africans and employing 1,100 people, Fenix solar panels are now sitting atop hundreds of thousands of homes in six countries, benefiting three million people. Not too shabby for a company that began in a garage in 2009. The startup went through series A and B financings before more recently getting acquired by a larger energy company, allowing for some cofounder exits. This was recorded in October 2019, just a couple days after Lyndsay stepped down as CEO of Fenix. With such an impressive track record behind her, what will Lyndsay do next? Well, as the head of the Ugandan Ultimate Frisbee Association, maybe she’ll have a little more time to play. But then, she’s got new business plans to keep making a difference. Listen to the interview to hear her story! Mentioned in this episode Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose by Tony Hsieh

41 MIN2019 NOV 1
Comments
Bringing Power—Solar and Social—to Rural Africans, with Lyndsay Holley Handler

Your Trash Is Tom Szaky's Treasure

As a teenager, Tom Szaky, an immigrant whose family fled Hungary after the Chernobyl disaster, was concerned about all all the garbage we produce. Rather than starting a recycling club, he started a company. Today, TerraCycle has 300 employees and brings in nearly $50 million in annual revenue. Their goal, as the company touts, is to make “recycling the unrecyclable not only feasible but desirable and profitable!”

32 MIN2019 OCT 15
Comments
Your Trash Is Tom Szaky's Treasure

The Meat-Scientist-Turned-Plant-Based-Entrepreneur

Many of the people running plant-based and clean meat companies are vegetarians themselves who often have come out of the animal protection or environmental communities. Not Rody Hawkins. In this episode, listen to the unlikely story of a meat man who’s now on a mission to efficiently feed the world with plants.

42 MIN2019 OCT 1
Comments
The Meat-Scientist-Turned-Plant-Based-Entrepreneur

Ep 25: Can Helping the Homeless with Surplus Food be Profitable? Jasmine Crowe is Betting on It.

For a lot of people, when they walk by someone who’s homeless, their inclination may be to look the other way. One day for Jasmine Crowe, however, she not only didn’t look the other way; she saw a profitable business opportunity in helping connect the hungry with perfectly good food the rest of us are throwing away. Sound like a pipedream? Well, today many major food users, including the NFL, the Atlanta airport, and Netflix pay the startup Jasmine founded to take their unsold food and deliver it to the hungry. And it turns out, thanks to federal tax law, it’s profitable not only for Jasmine’s company, but for those corporations paying to have their unwanted food go to the homeless, too. So far, Jasmine’s company Goodr has diverted more than two million pounds of food from landfills and into the stomachs of the homeless—all profitably. In this episode, we talk with Jasmine about her business model and how it’s helping the hungry while protecting the planet at the same time. R...

31 MIN2019 SEP 15
Comments
Ep 25: Can Helping the Homeless with Surplus Food be Profitable? Jasmine Crowe is Betting on It.

Ep 24: How Often Should Workers be Paid? Safwan Shah Has an Idea

Should employers really make their employees wait two weeks to get paid? You may not think it’s that important, but imagine if you had less than $400 in your bank account right now. You might start wondering why, in today’s digital age, you have to wait 14 days to get paid for work you did two weeks ago. Well, our guest—a rocket scientist-turned fin-tech-entrepreneur—says there’s no reason employees should have to wait. It’s their money, Safwan Shah says, and they should have access to it on demand. And if they don’t, the employer is essentially using the employee as a source of credit for itself, and at zero interest no less. In addition to founding his own payroll-type company to address this problem—which incidentally recently raised a $20 million Series B round—Safwan wrote a fascinating book on the topic. His company, PayActiv, is now in business with the likes of major employers like Walmart and Uber, helping to fulfil what Safwan calls his life’s mission: to eliminate financial suffering of the neediest. In this episode, Safwan offers a history of why we have the two-week pay period in the first place, and even gets biblical on us, citing the thoughts of both Moses and Mohammed. Yes, it turns out they both prescribed that employers pay employees for their labor right away. So listen to Safwan drop some ancient and modern knowledge on using timely payroll to help the poorest among us. Discussed in this episode Safwan’s book, It's About TIME: How Businesses Can Save the World (One Worker at a Time) Safwan’s company, PayActiv

35 MIN2019 SEP 1
Comments
Ep 24: How Often Should Workers be Paid? Safwan Shah Has an Idea
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。