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Women in Business (Audio)

Academy of Achievement

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Followers
8
Plays
Women in Business (Audio)
Women in Business (Audio)

Women in Business (Audio)

Academy of Achievement

1
Followers
8
Plays
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About Us

In recognition of Women's History Month, the Academy of Achievement presents a selection of extraordinary women who have defied expectations, broken boundaries, and made history around the world. They include courageous political leaders and human rights activists, recipients of the Nobel Prize for Literature and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, award-winning actresses, musicians, screenwriters and film directors, as well as outstanding athletes, educators, journalists, explorers, physicians, philanthropists, broadcasters and entrepreneurs. Their words and their example are an inspiration to us all.

Latest Episodes

Jacqueline Novogratz - Part 2

A graduate of the University of Virginia and Stanford Business School, Jacqueline Novogratz began her career in international banking with Chase Manhattan Bank before founding Duterimbere, a micro-finance institution in Rwanda. She initiated and led The Philanthropy Workshop and The Next Generation Leadership program at the Rockefeller Foundation. In 2001, Novogratz founded the Acumen Fund to finance small-scale businesses that supply life-changing goods and services to underserved communities in the developing world. By 2009 Acumen Fund had invested $40 million in over 35 enterprises. Today, locally controlled businesses with Acumen financing are providing energy, health care, housing and running water to 25 million people in Pakistan, India, Kenya and Tanzania. She related her experiences in the bestselling memoir, The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap Between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World.

22 MIN2010 MAR 24
Comments
Jacqueline Novogratz - Part 2

Jacqueline Novogratz - Part 1

A graduate of the University of Virginia and Stanford Business School, Jacqueline Novogratz began her career in international banking with Chase Manhattan Bank before founding Duterimbere, a micro-finance institution in Rwanda. She initiated and led The Philanthropy Workshop and The Next Generation Leadership program at the Rockefeller Foundation. In 2001, Novogratz founded the Acumen Fund to finance small-scale businesses that supply life-changing goods and services to underserved communities in the developing world. By 2009 Acumen Fund had invested $40 million in over 35 enterprises. Today, locally controlled businesses with Acumen financing are providing energy, health care, housing and running water to 25 million people in Pakistan, India, Kenya and Tanzania. She related her experiences in the bestselling memoir, The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap Between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World.

12 MIN2010 MAR 24
Comments
Jacqueline Novogratz - Part 1

Alice Waters

Owner of Chez Panisse, "the nation's most widely-acclaimed restaurant," Alice Waters led a culinary revolution that has transformed modern cooking. She first became inspired by great food and the culture surrounding it on a trip to France at age 19. After earning a degree in French Cultural Studies at the University of California, she traveled throughout France, then returned to Berkeley, California. At first, she intended to be a teacher, but she soon found she preferred cooking to teaching, and decided to open a neighborhood bistro like those she had loved in the south of France. It was eight years before Chez Panisse showed a profit, but in time, food lovers sought it out, and restaurant chefs in other cities began to imitate her approach. Her interest in serving the finest produce in season taught her that foods grown organically, in environmentally sound conditions, would produce the best flavors. Today, she encourages American families to eat together and take an interest in w...

13 MIN1998 MAY 23
Comments
Alice Waters

Lillian Vernon

A pioneer among women entrepreneurs, Lillian Vernon was the founder and longtime chairman of one of the nation's largest mail order businesses. Born in Germany, she and her parents came to America fleeing Nazi rule, and young Lillian learned her English watching movies. At 24, she was a housewife and mother looking for a way to supplement her husband's $75 weekly salary. She thought a mail order business might bring in another $50 a week. With money she had received as a wedding gift, she spent $495 for a five-inch ad in the September 1951 issue of Seventeen magazine, advertising monogrammed belts and purses. Her friends and family, even her husband, regarded her venture as a hobby at best, but in the first three months, her ad drew $32,000 worth of orders. Vernon encountered resistance from male suppliers, vendors and investors who had no interest in doing business with a woman, but her business prospered. Within five years, she was mailing a catalogue of housewares, gifts, toys an...

8 MIN1996 JUN 28
Comments
Lillian Vernon

Donna Karan

Karan began her career as an assistant designer with Anne Klein in the late 1960s, where she was eventually promoted to associate designer in 1971. When Anne Klein herself died in 1974, Takihyo Corporation of Japan became the new owner and Karan, together with her former classmate and friend Louis Dell'Ollio, became head designer of the house. In 1984, Karan left Anne Klein and, together with her then husband Stephan Weiss and Takihyo Corporation, started her own business "to design modern clothes for modern people". She showed her first women's clothing collection in 1985. Karan became well-known for her 'Essentials' line, initially offering seven easy pieces which could all be mixed and matched, and created a fully integrated wardrobe. Karan always insisted that she would only design clothes, like jersey dresses and opaque Lycra tights, that she would also wear herself. She was once described in the early 1990s by the New York Times as “[Ed Koch] in a stretchy black dress”. In 1...

15 MIN1994 JUN 1
Comments
Donna Karan

Judith Leiber

Judith Leiber is the world's foremost designer of elegant ladies' handbags. Born Judith Peto in Budapest, Hungary, she trained as a handbag maker in a traditional European guild system, learning every aspect of her craft from tanning the skins, to designing the frames and clasps, to painstakingly applying rhinestones with the tiniest tweezers imaginable. At age 18, she was the first woman to join the handbag makers guild. After World War II, she met an American soldier, Gerson Leiber; the couple were married and moved to New York City in 1947. Judith Leiber joined a major New York handbag firm as a designer but was dismayed by the low standards of craftsmanship in the American industry. In 1963, she and her husband took $5,000 they had save, started a firm of their own, Judith Leiber, Inc., to produce luxury handbags and accessories. Her creations are prized by women around the world for their imaginative designs and meticulous craftsmanship. Among her most famous creations are a "m...

8 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Judith Leiber

Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Winfrey's public speaking career began in 1957. At three, she was speaking in church, by her teens she was touring the churches of Nashville, reciting the sermons of James Weldon Johnson. Other children sang, Oprah talked. And she's still talking -- but to much larger audiences. The path that led from her grandmother's farm in Kosciusko, Mississippi to becoming the first African-American woman billionaire is a story of unwavering focus and unrelenting determination. Taught to read by her grandmother at an age when most children are only learning to talk, Oprah became a voracious reader -- a habit she retains to this day. Books became her outlet to the world and the basis of her passionate belief in education. An actress of uncommon talent, her first feature film, The Color Purple, brought her an Oscar nomination. Some call her lucky, but Oprah Winfrey doesn't believe in luck. She believes "luck is preparation meeting opportunity." Her rise from reading the news on a small radi...

17 MIN1989 JUN 23
Comments
Oprah Winfrey

Gloria Vanderbilt

Gloria Laura Morgan Vanderbilt is an award-winning designer, artist, and best-selling author, and a member of the prominent Vanderbilt family. She was born in New York City as an heiress to an American railroad dynasty. Gloria Vanderbilt was the survivor of the 20th century's most famous child custody case, which was the subject of national attention in the 1930s. She became the heiress to a trust fund after her father's death when she was only 15 months old. As a result of excessive spending, her mother's use of finances was scrutinized by the child Vanderbilt's paternal aunt, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. Whitney wanted custody of the young heiress and soon a famous custody trail became the lead story of 1934. The trial was so scandalous, people heard weeping and wailing inside the courtroom. Testimony was heard depicting the mother as an unfit parent; Vanderbilt's mother lost the battle and Gloria became the ward of her Aunt Gertrude. The story of the trial was told in a 1982 NBC ...

10 MIN1986 JUN 28
Comments
Gloria Vanderbilt
the END

Latest Episodes

Jacqueline Novogratz - Part 2

A graduate of the University of Virginia and Stanford Business School, Jacqueline Novogratz began her career in international banking with Chase Manhattan Bank before founding Duterimbere, a micro-finance institution in Rwanda. She initiated and led The Philanthropy Workshop and The Next Generation Leadership program at the Rockefeller Foundation. In 2001, Novogratz founded the Acumen Fund to finance small-scale businesses that supply life-changing goods and services to underserved communities in the developing world. By 2009 Acumen Fund had invested $40 million in over 35 enterprises. Today, locally controlled businesses with Acumen financing are providing energy, health care, housing and running water to 25 million people in Pakistan, India, Kenya and Tanzania. She related her experiences in the bestselling memoir, The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap Between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World.

22 MIN2010 MAR 24
Comments
Jacqueline Novogratz - Part 2

Jacqueline Novogratz - Part 1

A graduate of the University of Virginia and Stanford Business School, Jacqueline Novogratz began her career in international banking with Chase Manhattan Bank before founding Duterimbere, a micro-finance institution in Rwanda. She initiated and led The Philanthropy Workshop and The Next Generation Leadership program at the Rockefeller Foundation. In 2001, Novogratz founded the Acumen Fund to finance small-scale businesses that supply life-changing goods and services to underserved communities in the developing world. By 2009 Acumen Fund had invested $40 million in over 35 enterprises. Today, locally controlled businesses with Acumen financing are providing energy, health care, housing and running water to 25 million people in Pakistan, India, Kenya and Tanzania. She related her experiences in the bestselling memoir, The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap Between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World.

12 MIN2010 MAR 24
Comments
Jacqueline Novogratz - Part 1

Alice Waters

Owner of Chez Panisse, "the nation's most widely-acclaimed restaurant," Alice Waters led a culinary revolution that has transformed modern cooking. She first became inspired by great food and the culture surrounding it on a trip to France at age 19. After earning a degree in French Cultural Studies at the University of California, she traveled throughout France, then returned to Berkeley, California. At first, she intended to be a teacher, but she soon found she preferred cooking to teaching, and decided to open a neighborhood bistro like those she had loved in the south of France. It was eight years before Chez Panisse showed a profit, but in time, food lovers sought it out, and restaurant chefs in other cities began to imitate her approach. Her interest in serving the finest produce in season taught her that foods grown organically, in environmentally sound conditions, would produce the best flavors. Today, she encourages American families to eat together and take an interest in w...

13 MIN1998 MAY 23
Comments
Alice Waters

Lillian Vernon

A pioneer among women entrepreneurs, Lillian Vernon was the founder and longtime chairman of one of the nation's largest mail order businesses. Born in Germany, she and her parents came to America fleeing Nazi rule, and young Lillian learned her English watching movies. At 24, she was a housewife and mother looking for a way to supplement her husband's $75 weekly salary. She thought a mail order business might bring in another $50 a week. With money she had received as a wedding gift, she spent $495 for a five-inch ad in the September 1951 issue of Seventeen magazine, advertising monogrammed belts and purses. Her friends and family, even her husband, regarded her venture as a hobby at best, but in the first three months, her ad drew $32,000 worth of orders. Vernon encountered resistance from male suppliers, vendors and investors who had no interest in doing business with a woman, but her business prospered. Within five years, she was mailing a catalogue of housewares, gifts, toys an...

8 MIN1996 JUN 28
Comments
Lillian Vernon

Donna Karan

Karan began her career as an assistant designer with Anne Klein in the late 1960s, where she was eventually promoted to associate designer in 1971. When Anne Klein herself died in 1974, Takihyo Corporation of Japan became the new owner and Karan, together with her former classmate and friend Louis Dell'Ollio, became head designer of the house. In 1984, Karan left Anne Klein and, together with her then husband Stephan Weiss and Takihyo Corporation, started her own business "to design modern clothes for modern people". She showed her first women's clothing collection in 1985. Karan became well-known for her 'Essentials' line, initially offering seven easy pieces which could all be mixed and matched, and created a fully integrated wardrobe. Karan always insisted that she would only design clothes, like jersey dresses and opaque Lycra tights, that she would also wear herself. She was once described in the early 1990s by the New York Times as “[Ed Koch] in a stretchy black dress”. In 1...

15 MIN1994 JUN 1
Comments
Donna Karan

Judith Leiber

Judith Leiber is the world's foremost designer of elegant ladies' handbags. Born Judith Peto in Budapest, Hungary, she trained as a handbag maker in a traditional European guild system, learning every aspect of her craft from tanning the skins, to designing the frames and clasps, to painstakingly applying rhinestones with the tiniest tweezers imaginable. At age 18, she was the first woman to join the handbag makers guild. After World War II, she met an American soldier, Gerson Leiber; the couple were married and moved to New York City in 1947. Judith Leiber joined a major New York handbag firm as a designer but was dismayed by the low standards of craftsmanship in the American industry. In 1963, she and her husband took $5,000 they had save, started a firm of their own, Judith Leiber, Inc., to produce luxury handbags and accessories. Her creations are prized by women around the world for their imaginative designs and meticulous craftsmanship. Among her most famous creations are a "m...

8 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Judith Leiber

Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Winfrey's public speaking career began in 1957. At three, she was speaking in church, by her teens she was touring the churches of Nashville, reciting the sermons of James Weldon Johnson. Other children sang, Oprah talked. And she's still talking -- but to much larger audiences. The path that led from her grandmother's farm in Kosciusko, Mississippi to becoming the first African-American woman billionaire is a story of unwavering focus and unrelenting determination. Taught to read by her grandmother at an age when most children are only learning to talk, Oprah became a voracious reader -- a habit she retains to this day. Books became her outlet to the world and the basis of her passionate belief in education. An actress of uncommon talent, her first feature film, The Color Purple, brought her an Oscar nomination. Some call her lucky, but Oprah Winfrey doesn't believe in luck. She believes "luck is preparation meeting opportunity." Her rise from reading the news on a small radi...

17 MIN1989 JUN 23
Comments
Oprah Winfrey

Gloria Vanderbilt

Gloria Laura Morgan Vanderbilt is an award-winning designer, artist, and best-selling author, and a member of the prominent Vanderbilt family. She was born in New York City as an heiress to an American railroad dynasty. Gloria Vanderbilt was the survivor of the 20th century's most famous child custody case, which was the subject of national attention in the 1930s. She became the heiress to a trust fund after her father's death when she was only 15 months old. As a result of excessive spending, her mother's use of finances was scrutinized by the child Vanderbilt's paternal aunt, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. Whitney wanted custody of the young heiress and soon a famous custody trail became the lead story of 1934. The trial was so scandalous, people heard weeping and wailing inside the courtroom. Testimony was heard depicting the mother as an unfit parent; Vanderbilt's mother lost the battle and Gloria became the ward of her Aunt Gertrude. The story of the trial was told in a 1982 NBC ...

10 MIN1986 JUN 28
Comments
Gloria Vanderbilt
the END