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Purpose in the Process

Shiloh Coleman: Purpose in the Process

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Purpose in the Process
Purpose in the Process

Purpose in the Process

Shiloh Coleman: Purpose in the Process

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A purposeful life is a better life. In this podcast we'll look for the “why” behind the “how” in processes related to business and career, health and well-being, adventurous living, relationships and family, personal growth, and spiritual connectedness. Join us each week for thought provoking conversations with interesting people from all walks of life.

Latest Episodes

Will Blackman - Staying in the Moment

My friend Will Blackman returns to help kick-off the second season of the podcast and give us an update. For his first visit, go check out Episode 19! In this episode, Will and I discussed: What Will has learned about the importance of staying in the moment - and how continuously returning to prayer throughout the day can help exercise that muscle Taking refuge within, despite “the shuffling of plates" How does Will feel about Viktor Frankl’s charge that we should strive to live in a manner “worth” our suffering? Learning to accept and embrace love (from both God and people) Viktor Frankl’s view on religion being for the salvation of the soul, while logotherapy is for healing. Does God have a real place in our lives if we truly believe we can heal ourselves? How constant distraction by the physical can starve us from experiencing the spiritual The importance of making room to listen for God I hope you enjoy our conversation about the purpose in the process of staying in the moment!

47 MINAUG 26
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Will Blackman - Staying in the Moment

Peter Merriman - A Humble Approach to Hospitality

Famous chefs don’t become known because of their humility. But as it turns out, their restaurants might. In this episode of the podcast, I spoke with renowned chef Peter Merriman about his unique approach to hospitality in his restaurants. Why is it that a person always feels welcome when they check-in with his hosts? How does Peter motivate his entire staff to entertain like they are “throwing a party every night,” prepare each and every dish like they are “cooking for their mom,” and consistently go above and beyond to “do the right thing” for every customer they meet? In this episode, we discuss: Why service matters as much (if not more) than the food What are his “vital few” that he focuses on with staff? The key importance of establishing and maintaining relationships How Peter hires right, then gives his people a chance to shine What it means to focus on the “internal customers” How those who are served can get the most out of our experience as customers The importance of sustainability, and connecting with the source of our food How customer demand impacts quality The importance of humility to the success of any restaurant Thanks for listening! As always, I appreciate your feedback, and please consider supporting this ad-free podcast by becoming a supporter on Patreon Links and More Info: https://www.merrimanshawaii.com/ https://www.monkeypodkitchen.com/ PETER’S STORY: Peter Merriman has been as a culinary pioneer in Hawaii for 30 years. Known as the original “locavore”, Peter is a vocal champion of Hawaii’s farmers, ranchers and fishermen. His restaurants showcase island grown and harvested foods through simple preparations that reflect the myriad flavors of Hawaii’s multiculturalism. Dubbed the “Pied Piper of Hawaii Regional Cuisine” by The Los Angeles Times, he is a continuing inspiration to Hawaii’s thriving culinary scene. Early Years Peter was raised in Pittsburgh, where a passion for food was instilled in him from a young age. His mother, Woodene, was a noted Pittsburgh Post Gazette food writer, and by the time he was 16, he was doing “grunt work” for Master Chef Ferdinand Metz at the H. J. Heinz Co. (Chef Metz later headed the renowned Culinary Institute of America.) Pursuing the opportunity to play football, Peter attended The University of Pennsylvania and studied Political Science. After graduation, Merriman enrolled in a three-year Chef's Apprentice Program with RockResorts under the auspices of the American Culinary Federation. The apprenticeship program took Peter to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and to Woodstock, Vermont, where he studied at the Woodstock Inn, under the supervision of Chef Hans Schadler. He then went on to various stints in resort areas across the United States and Europe, including a summer working among the vineyards of France’s Champagne region. In early 1983, Peter was hired as a cook for the Mauna Lani Bay Hotel. He arrived in Hawaii with one suitcase and $75 in his pocket thinking he would stay a few months at the most. But he fell in love with the natural beauty of the islands and the rich culture of the people who live there. In 1985, only two years after his arrival, he was appointed Executive Chef of the Mauna Lani Resort’s new Gallery Restaurant. Chef & Pioneer of Hawaii Regional Cuisine At his interview for the chef position at The Gallery Restaurant, Peter was asked what type of food he wanted to feature. Without thinking, he said “regional cuisine” and went on to explain how no other restaurants were serving the local fish and produce. Peter believed that to be able to offer fish that was caught the same morning and to use vegetables harvested the day that they were served was essential to providing the best gourmet Hawaii cuisine. When Peter got the job, he had to deliver on the concept, but quickly discovered there were almost no local products available. Peter advertised in the newspapers and went out to the farms, ranches and docks to let local producers know he wante

30 MINJUN 18
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Peter Merriman - A Humble Approach to Hospitality

Dr. Hyla Cass - A Purposeful Approach to Functional Medicine

We go to the doctor with the goal of feeling better, so it should come as no surprise that conventional medicine is often aimed at helping us deal with symptoms, rather than identifying and addressing the underlying cause. Such an approach is all the more likely in an overwhelmed healthcare system where doctors are increasingly unable to spend the time required to identify and address the root issues behind many “chronic” conditions, especially those with no immediately apparent source. In this episode of the podcast, I spoke with Dr. Hyla Cass about what has fueled her career-long desire to get to the bottom of what ails her patients, whether as a replacement for, or alongside more conventional treatments. As a renowned expert in functional medicine, Dr. Cass has written extensively about topics such as the nutritional supplementation of prescription drugs, alternative approaches to overcoming addiction, and even ways patients can avoid addiction to begin with by employing natural ways to elevate mood, battle stress, and increase energy. Her latest passion involves the many uses of CBD oil for the treatment of a variety of conditions, which she writes about in her new book Your Amazing Itty Bitty Guide to Cannabis: 15 Key Steps to Understanding the Many Benefits of the Cannabis Plant. In this episode, we discuss: The importance of recognizing emotional trauma in the treatment of physical symptoms Prevention and treatment of postpartum depression The potential link between prescription drugs and mass shootings The influence of economics on healthcare policy and conventional medical treatment in the US Her viewpoint as a physician on the challenges facing the US health insurance system How CBD oil can be used to address a wide variety of issues Recent developments (and historic research) into the use of hallucinogenics to treat mental illness The importance of organic eating, moving every day, and social/family activities to promoting health and well-being Links: Dr. Cass’ website Link to the article Dr. Cass wrote about the possible connection between prescription drugs and mass shootings. Link to the Weed documentary with Dr. Sanjay Gupta. Projectcbd.org, a site recommended for information relating to the research behind CBD oil. ewg.org, the environmental working group site dedicated to empowering people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. Link to the Secret Ingredients movie we discussed, about the unexpected impact of the ingredients in our every day foods. Your Amazing Itty Bitty Guide to Cannabis: 15 Key Steps to Understanding the Many Benefits of the Cannabis Plant 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health 2016: A Take-Charge Plan for Women to Correct Imbalances, Reclaim Energy and Restore Well-Being Supplement Your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn't Know about Nutrition Natural Highs: Supplements, Nutrition, and Mind-Body Techniques to Help You Feel Good All the Time 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health

56 MINMAY 20
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Dr. Hyla Cass - A Purposeful Approach to Functional Medicine

Discovering Your Seven Stories

What accomplishments are you most proud of? When you think of the "top stories" of your life - those where you felt most empowered, full of joy, or simply had a great time doing something you were really good at - which experiences rise to the top? More importantly, what specific attributes seem to be common to each of those stories? On the heels of a couple deep philosophical episodes about finding “purpose,” I wanted to offer some concrete advice about the “process” someone might use to start figuring out what they want to be when they grow up. I’ve mentioned the “Seven Stories Exercise” in several past episodes and have promised to unpack that process at some point…at long last, here it is! In this episode, we discuss: The importance of doing “the work” in discovering what motivates you, not just what you are good at! The Seven Stories process I have used (and have taught others to use) that will help you brainstorm career change ideas; or how you might stay in your current role but in a more meaningful, happy way How you as a candidate can use this tool to come up with questions for your next job interview I offer a free, practical evaluative tool you can use once you have done this work to sift through potential job opportunities and life changes - I hope it benefits you! Links: A pretty good example of someone else’s tool to do the first part of the exercise (i.e., to spot your essential traits) Then, here’s the simple free tool I designed myself in Google Sheets to compare various opportunities and track my own desired job attributes against those prospects (this tool gives you a final output of the 7 stories process).

43 MINAPR 29
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Discovering Your Seven Stories

Finding Meaning In Responsibility

In this second part of a two-part special series I focus on the importance, and process, of finding meaning and purpose in life, as found in the book Man’s Search For Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. Frankl explains how responsibility to oneself and others (and to what life is asking of you) is a vital counterpart to freedom, a concept echoed by many present-day authors, including notable thought leaders like Jordan Peterson and Jocko Wilink. If you only listen to one of these two episodes on Frankl’s book, this is the one to listen to for sure, because we talk and reflect on the second section of the book which is where Frankl goes into detail about the actual process of finding meaning in life. My 15 year old son Joseph joined me for this second part of the series, and offers his generation’s unique perspective on this issue. We definitely added a lot of our own thoughts to what Frankl wrote about this topic, so I hope you enjoy as we discuss: Distinctions between Freud, Adler, and Frankl The importance of the pursuit of meaning in general (the will to meaning) How meaning is found in each and every moment What it means to answering life’s questions for each of us - not just challenges, but gifts as well If people aren’t motivated by money and power, then what does motivate them? How smiling more can make you happier Why is that men tend to have more issues with purpose and meaning? What does Peterson mean when he echoes Frankl’s views on how our “rights” are only half of the conversation - what about the responsibilities that come with those rights? What responsibilities might come with our rights as “freedom loving” Americans? What country might gift the US a statue of responsibility? Did Frankl in 1946 predict accurately that technological advancements in AI and robotics would lead to an increase in existential crises from a lack of meaning and purpose? What does it mean when a person in the Christian faith says their purpose is found in God? How spiritual disciplines fit into the daily practice of seeking purpose in faith What does it mean that we find out who we are by discovering who we are not? There’s no one particular abstract meaning of life - it is unique to each person Our invitation for Jocko Wilink to come on the show and change Joseph’s mind The three specific ways Frankl describes as paths to finding meaning What can be done to turn the tide on the lack of responsibility in society - if anything Links: Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning The TED Talk on smiling Joseph referred to Herzberg’s 2 factor theory (Motivation/Hygiene) for what truly motivates people The Statue of Responsibility prototype at UVU in Utah Jordan Peterson’s Self-Authoring suite Jordan Peterson’s 12 Rules For Living: An Antidote to Chaos The 4th Industrial Revolution: A Guardian article about whether a life lived with robots taking over our jobs is really worth living The authentic manhood program, originally taught by Robert Lewis in 2005, where he described a crisis of masculinity due to an unclear idea of what it means to be a man today (and included rejecting passivity as part of the solution) Benjamin Franklin’s exhortation to prayer Jocko Wilink’s Extreme Ownership: How US Navy Seals Lead and Win The great movie about the importance of outlook and attitude, The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life

94 MINAPR 14
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Finding Meaning In Responsibility

Viktor Frankl - Man's Search For Meaning

In this special episode of the podcast I wanted to respond to a listener request by offering some takeaways from the globally renowned book Man’s Search For Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. I’ve mentioned this book in past episodes when discussing the importance of living a life of purpose with various guests, because at the end of the day Frankl’s message regarding the importance of finding purpose and meaning in life is core to the whole point of this podcast. This is not intended to be a summary by any means, and is certainly not a scholarly attempt to interpret what Frankl wrote in 1946 - but perhaps my amateur musings about such an amazing piece of literature will inspire you to get a copy this important book so you can see for yourself the conclusions that might be reached. When I interview guests I’m always interested in the processes and stories about what makes their particular journey, craft, skill, or art so unique, but I’m even more interested in the purpose behind those processes. Frankl’s book offers insights as to why purpose is so important to all of us, and how finding meaning in our lives (and even the process of setting out to do so) can help us to overcome many emotional, mental, and even physical challenges. I hope you enjoy part 1 of this special 2 part series, which covers: Life in the concentration camps of WW 2 How they could tell when a prisoner had lost the will to live, and what that meant for them The delusion of reprieve Is it true that people can get used to just about anything? What does it mean that “love” is the ultimate and highest purpose? The importance of taking refuge in the inner-life Humor as a weapon for saving the soul Freedom from suffering as a form of negative happiness How attempting to avoid suffering can often cause it The importance of paying attention to inward peace (or lack thereof) in making our choices The last of human freedoms: to be worthy of your sufferings The dangers of retrospective living The importance of naming our emotions How loss of hope can have a deadly effect The two races of men LINKS Man's Search For Meaning by Viktor Frankl Tara Brach’s article “Tea with Mara”

86 MINAPR 11
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Viktor Frankl - Man's Search For Meaning

Staying Safe on the Road

They say courtesy is not so common anymore - this seems to be especially true on the road. As I start to teach my son how to drive, I’ve been noticing that even some of the most experienced adult drivers are no longer driving in the kind of courteous and safe manner most likely to avoid both accidents and tickets. In this episode of the podcast I summarize a few principles about safe driving, and offer my insights as both a former police officer and attorney into some of the top ways to stay safer on the road, including how to avoid and deal with road rage. I hope you enjoy this episode about the purpose in the process of staying safe on the road! Resources: Tips for keeping young drivers off cell phones NHTSA’s Crash Stats site AAA’s road rage brochure

27 MINAPR 1
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Staying Safe on the Road

10-Minute Takeaways Bonus Episode: Finding Your Calling

Have you ever wondered if you have found your true calling? What even makes something a “calling” anyways? In this short “10-minute take-aways” bonus episode, we summarize a process that might be useful for you when considering these questions. What I like best about this particular process is that it also helps you identify the type of changes that might be needed to get yourself positioned into a new and more meaningful direction. This is hardly a new process, but lately I’ve found myself explaining it to a few people and so I thought it would be something my audience would enjoy learning more about. I hope you enjoy this bonus episode about the purpose in the process of finding your calling!

11 MINMAR 23
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10-Minute Takeaways Bonus Episode: Finding Your Calling

Joe Villarreal - Stories From the Road

If you’re a life-long learner, you will undoubtedly create a lot of stories. The more careers, jobs, skills, and new circumstances you experience, the more people you will cross paths with. But, at the end of the day, who are those stories really for? My friend and fellow polymath Joe Villarreal joined me in this episode for a wide-ranging discussion about the importance of surrendering our own hopes and fears to experience the joy and fulfillment that comes from living a life in the eternal space we know only as “now”…and the importance of sharing what we experience in that space with others. Joe and I discussed: Why it’s important to embrace who you are The need for change agents How to know what to do next (or, “letting the bubbles land”) What does it mean to have “now” faith? The necessity of surrender How we can often get lost in our own “joy creation” Why regret and hesitation must be “removed from the equation” Why our own happiness is also our own responsibility...

92 MINMAR 18
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Joe Villarreal - Stories From the Road

Will Blackman - Breaking the Outer Man

In Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life, author Richard Rohr builds on psychologist Carl Jung’s description of a process by which we let go of who we think we are supposed to be, and start to more accurately express our “true” selves. Rohr, a Franciscan Priest, adds a spiritual perspective to Jung’s framework of first half and second half life experiences, concluding that “Your True Self is who you objectively are from the beginning, in the mind and heart of God.” This is, of course, hardly a view unique to the Christian faith. As Rohr points out, Zen Buddhists have since long ago referred to the true self as “the face you had before you were born.” Rohr’s “second half” spiritual discovery of a true self requires what he calls a “downward process” brought on by a divinely placed “stumbling stone,” resulting in the paradoxically necessary process of self-surrender. Rohr is not alone in his application of scripture, church history, and experience to reach the conclusion that we often stand in our own way when it comes to experiencing all that God has in store for us. “Sooner or later a servant of God discovers that he himself is the greatest frustration of his work.” So wrote Watchman Nee (1903-1972), an early 20th century church leader and teacher who died in a Chinese prison after 20 years of incarceration for his faith. Similar to Rohr’s “downward process,” Nee explains in The Breaking of the Outer Man and the Release of the Spirit that our lives inevitably require the breaking of an outer veneer to release the “true” spirit inside each of us. Author John Eldredge, in his popular book Wild At Heart, similarly writes that “In order to take a man into his wound, so that he can heal it and begin the release of the true self, God will thwart the false self. He will take away all that you’ve leaned upon to bring you life.” As Eldredge explains, the process of taking off a mask worn for a lifetime can sometimes be a painful one. So, what’s the point - is this just about building a better “you”? It can end there - but it doesn’t have to. There’s so much more to it than that. Unlike typical “self-help” practices, which make no apologies for perfecting and improving as a means to itself, what Christian authors like Nee, Rohr, and Eldridge all describe in the “breaking” process is not merely a journey of self-improvement for the purpose of “bettering ourselves.” While certainly greater peace and contentment may come from a better understanding of our true nature, Nee explains that by virtue of this journey God “wants to prepare a way to bring His blessing to the world through those who belong to Him.” In other words, it turns out that in finding ourselves (and hence our unique purpose) we will eventually realize, as Rick Warren writes in the first line of The Purpose Driven Life, that “It’s not about you.” Then, who is it about? Answering that question may first require you to reimagine your concept, or description, of God. Is it possible that in the process of helping you to discover your own “true self,” God will also be revealing something to you something about who He is? In addition to becoming a greater blessing to the world, as Nee describes, is it possible that God also wants you to be a blessing to Him? What if it’s just as important to consider not only what God wants for you, but why he wants that, for you? We can often think of prayer (and even faith practices more broadly) as ways by which we discover God’s will for our lives, get answers, obtain guidance, make divine requests, intercede for others, and try to learn more about our purpose. All good things! But what if God might also have something to relate to each of us individually - about himself? What if, by breaking our outer man, we might also learn more not just about our own heart, but also about God’s heart for each of us? If we truly believe that God is both immanent and transcendent (totally unfathomable and yet intensely knowable)

61 MINMAR 4
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Will Blackman - Breaking the Outer Man

Latest Episodes

Will Blackman - Staying in the Moment

My friend Will Blackman returns to help kick-off the second season of the podcast and give us an update. For his first visit, go check out Episode 19! In this episode, Will and I discussed: What Will has learned about the importance of staying in the moment - and how continuously returning to prayer throughout the day can help exercise that muscle Taking refuge within, despite “the shuffling of plates" How does Will feel about Viktor Frankl’s charge that we should strive to live in a manner “worth” our suffering? Learning to accept and embrace love (from both God and people) Viktor Frankl’s view on religion being for the salvation of the soul, while logotherapy is for healing. Does God have a real place in our lives if we truly believe we can heal ourselves? How constant distraction by the physical can starve us from experiencing the spiritual The importance of making room to listen for God I hope you enjoy our conversation about the purpose in the process of staying in the moment!

47 MINAUG 26
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Will Blackman - Staying in the Moment

Peter Merriman - A Humble Approach to Hospitality

Famous chefs don’t become known because of their humility. But as it turns out, their restaurants might. In this episode of the podcast, I spoke with renowned chef Peter Merriman about his unique approach to hospitality in his restaurants. Why is it that a person always feels welcome when they check-in with his hosts? How does Peter motivate his entire staff to entertain like they are “throwing a party every night,” prepare each and every dish like they are “cooking for their mom,” and consistently go above and beyond to “do the right thing” for every customer they meet? In this episode, we discuss: Why service matters as much (if not more) than the food What are his “vital few” that he focuses on with staff? The key importance of establishing and maintaining relationships How Peter hires right, then gives his people a chance to shine What it means to focus on the “internal customers” How those who are served can get the most out of our experience as customers The importance of sustainability, and connecting with the source of our food How customer demand impacts quality The importance of humility to the success of any restaurant Thanks for listening! As always, I appreciate your feedback, and please consider supporting this ad-free podcast by becoming a supporter on Patreon Links and More Info: https://www.merrimanshawaii.com/ https://www.monkeypodkitchen.com/ PETER’S STORY: Peter Merriman has been as a culinary pioneer in Hawaii for 30 years. Known as the original “locavore”, Peter is a vocal champion of Hawaii’s farmers, ranchers and fishermen. His restaurants showcase island grown and harvested foods through simple preparations that reflect the myriad flavors of Hawaii’s multiculturalism. Dubbed the “Pied Piper of Hawaii Regional Cuisine” by The Los Angeles Times, he is a continuing inspiration to Hawaii’s thriving culinary scene. Early Years Peter was raised in Pittsburgh, where a passion for food was instilled in him from a young age. His mother, Woodene, was a noted Pittsburgh Post Gazette food writer, and by the time he was 16, he was doing “grunt work” for Master Chef Ferdinand Metz at the H. J. Heinz Co. (Chef Metz later headed the renowned Culinary Institute of America.) Pursuing the opportunity to play football, Peter attended The University of Pennsylvania and studied Political Science. After graduation, Merriman enrolled in a three-year Chef's Apprentice Program with RockResorts under the auspices of the American Culinary Federation. The apprenticeship program took Peter to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, and to Woodstock, Vermont, where he studied at the Woodstock Inn, under the supervision of Chef Hans Schadler. He then went on to various stints in resort areas across the United States and Europe, including a summer working among the vineyards of France’s Champagne region. In early 1983, Peter was hired as a cook for the Mauna Lani Bay Hotel. He arrived in Hawaii with one suitcase and $75 in his pocket thinking he would stay a few months at the most. But he fell in love with the natural beauty of the islands and the rich culture of the people who live there. In 1985, only two years after his arrival, he was appointed Executive Chef of the Mauna Lani Resort’s new Gallery Restaurant. Chef & Pioneer of Hawaii Regional Cuisine At his interview for the chef position at The Gallery Restaurant, Peter was asked what type of food he wanted to feature. Without thinking, he said “regional cuisine” and went on to explain how no other restaurants were serving the local fish and produce. Peter believed that to be able to offer fish that was caught the same morning and to use vegetables harvested the day that they were served was essential to providing the best gourmet Hawaii cuisine. When Peter got the job, he had to deliver on the concept, but quickly discovered there were almost no local products available. Peter advertised in the newspapers and went out to the farms, ranches and docks to let local producers know he wante

30 MINJUN 18
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Peter Merriman - A Humble Approach to Hospitality

Dr. Hyla Cass - A Purposeful Approach to Functional Medicine

We go to the doctor with the goal of feeling better, so it should come as no surprise that conventional medicine is often aimed at helping us deal with symptoms, rather than identifying and addressing the underlying cause. Such an approach is all the more likely in an overwhelmed healthcare system where doctors are increasingly unable to spend the time required to identify and address the root issues behind many “chronic” conditions, especially those with no immediately apparent source. In this episode of the podcast, I spoke with Dr. Hyla Cass about what has fueled her career-long desire to get to the bottom of what ails her patients, whether as a replacement for, or alongside more conventional treatments. As a renowned expert in functional medicine, Dr. Cass has written extensively about topics such as the nutritional supplementation of prescription drugs, alternative approaches to overcoming addiction, and even ways patients can avoid addiction to begin with by employing natural ways to elevate mood, battle stress, and increase energy. Her latest passion involves the many uses of CBD oil for the treatment of a variety of conditions, which she writes about in her new book Your Amazing Itty Bitty Guide to Cannabis: 15 Key Steps to Understanding the Many Benefits of the Cannabis Plant. In this episode, we discuss: The importance of recognizing emotional trauma in the treatment of physical symptoms Prevention and treatment of postpartum depression The potential link between prescription drugs and mass shootings The influence of economics on healthcare policy and conventional medical treatment in the US Her viewpoint as a physician on the challenges facing the US health insurance system How CBD oil can be used to address a wide variety of issues Recent developments (and historic research) into the use of hallucinogenics to treat mental illness The importance of organic eating, moving every day, and social/family activities to promoting health and well-being Links: Dr. Cass’ website Link to the article Dr. Cass wrote about the possible connection between prescription drugs and mass shootings. Link to the Weed documentary with Dr. Sanjay Gupta. Projectcbd.org, a site recommended for information relating to the research behind CBD oil. ewg.org, the environmental working group site dedicated to empowering people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment. Link to the Secret Ingredients movie we discussed, about the unexpected impact of the ingredients in our every day foods. Your Amazing Itty Bitty Guide to Cannabis: 15 Key Steps to Understanding the Many Benefits of the Cannabis Plant 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health 2016: A Take-Charge Plan for Women to Correct Imbalances, Reclaim Energy and Restore Well-Being Supplement Your Prescription: What Your Doctor Doesn't Know about Nutrition Natural Highs: Supplements, Nutrition, and Mind-Body Techniques to Help You Feel Good All the Time 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health

56 MINMAY 20
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Dr. Hyla Cass - A Purposeful Approach to Functional Medicine

Discovering Your Seven Stories

What accomplishments are you most proud of? When you think of the "top stories" of your life - those where you felt most empowered, full of joy, or simply had a great time doing something you were really good at - which experiences rise to the top? More importantly, what specific attributes seem to be common to each of those stories? On the heels of a couple deep philosophical episodes about finding “purpose,” I wanted to offer some concrete advice about the “process” someone might use to start figuring out what they want to be when they grow up. I’ve mentioned the “Seven Stories Exercise” in several past episodes and have promised to unpack that process at some point…at long last, here it is! In this episode, we discuss: The importance of doing “the work” in discovering what motivates you, not just what you are good at! The Seven Stories process I have used (and have taught others to use) that will help you brainstorm career change ideas; or how you might stay in your current role but in a more meaningful, happy way How you as a candidate can use this tool to come up with questions for your next job interview I offer a free, practical evaluative tool you can use once you have done this work to sift through potential job opportunities and life changes - I hope it benefits you! Links: A pretty good example of someone else’s tool to do the first part of the exercise (i.e., to spot your essential traits) Then, here’s the simple free tool I designed myself in Google Sheets to compare various opportunities and track my own desired job attributes against those prospects (this tool gives you a final output of the 7 stories process).

43 MINAPR 29
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Discovering Your Seven Stories

Finding Meaning In Responsibility

In this second part of a two-part special series I focus on the importance, and process, of finding meaning and purpose in life, as found in the book Man’s Search For Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. Frankl explains how responsibility to oneself and others (and to what life is asking of you) is a vital counterpart to freedom, a concept echoed by many present-day authors, including notable thought leaders like Jordan Peterson and Jocko Wilink. If you only listen to one of these two episodes on Frankl’s book, this is the one to listen to for sure, because we talk and reflect on the second section of the book which is where Frankl goes into detail about the actual process of finding meaning in life. My 15 year old son Joseph joined me for this second part of the series, and offers his generation’s unique perspective on this issue. We definitely added a lot of our own thoughts to what Frankl wrote about this topic, so I hope you enjoy as we discuss: Distinctions between Freud, Adler, and Frankl The importance of the pursuit of meaning in general (the will to meaning) How meaning is found in each and every moment What it means to answering life’s questions for each of us - not just challenges, but gifts as well If people aren’t motivated by money and power, then what does motivate them? How smiling more can make you happier Why is that men tend to have more issues with purpose and meaning? What does Peterson mean when he echoes Frankl’s views on how our “rights” are only half of the conversation - what about the responsibilities that come with those rights? What responsibilities might come with our rights as “freedom loving” Americans? What country might gift the US a statue of responsibility? Did Frankl in 1946 predict accurately that technological advancements in AI and robotics would lead to an increase in existential crises from a lack of meaning and purpose? What does it mean when a person in the Christian faith says their purpose is found in God? How spiritual disciplines fit into the daily practice of seeking purpose in faith What does it mean that we find out who we are by discovering who we are not? There’s no one particular abstract meaning of life - it is unique to each person Our invitation for Jocko Wilink to come on the show and change Joseph’s mind The three specific ways Frankl describes as paths to finding meaning What can be done to turn the tide on the lack of responsibility in society - if anything Links: Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning The TED Talk on smiling Joseph referred to Herzberg’s 2 factor theory (Motivation/Hygiene) for what truly motivates people The Statue of Responsibility prototype at UVU in Utah Jordan Peterson’s Self-Authoring suite Jordan Peterson’s 12 Rules For Living: An Antidote to Chaos The 4th Industrial Revolution: A Guardian article about whether a life lived with robots taking over our jobs is really worth living The authentic manhood program, originally taught by Robert Lewis in 2005, where he described a crisis of masculinity due to an unclear idea of what it means to be a man today (and included rejecting passivity as part of the solution) Benjamin Franklin’s exhortation to prayer Jocko Wilink’s Extreme Ownership: How US Navy Seals Lead and Win The great movie about the importance of outlook and attitude, The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life

94 MINAPR 14
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Finding Meaning In Responsibility

Viktor Frankl - Man's Search For Meaning

In this special episode of the podcast I wanted to respond to a listener request by offering some takeaways from the globally renowned book Man’s Search For Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. I’ve mentioned this book in past episodes when discussing the importance of living a life of purpose with various guests, because at the end of the day Frankl’s message regarding the importance of finding purpose and meaning in life is core to the whole point of this podcast. This is not intended to be a summary by any means, and is certainly not a scholarly attempt to interpret what Frankl wrote in 1946 - but perhaps my amateur musings about such an amazing piece of literature will inspire you to get a copy this important book so you can see for yourself the conclusions that might be reached. When I interview guests I’m always interested in the processes and stories about what makes their particular journey, craft, skill, or art so unique, but I’m even more interested in the purpose behind those processes. Frankl’s book offers insights as to why purpose is so important to all of us, and how finding meaning in our lives (and even the process of setting out to do so) can help us to overcome many emotional, mental, and even physical challenges. I hope you enjoy part 1 of this special 2 part series, which covers: Life in the concentration camps of WW 2 How they could tell when a prisoner had lost the will to live, and what that meant for them The delusion of reprieve Is it true that people can get used to just about anything? What does it mean that “love” is the ultimate and highest purpose? The importance of taking refuge in the inner-life Humor as a weapon for saving the soul Freedom from suffering as a form of negative happiness How attempting to avoid suffering can often cause it The importance of paying attention to inward peace (or lack thereof) in making our choices The last of human freedoms: to be worthy of your sufferings The dangers of retrospective living The importance of naming our emotions How loss of hope can have a deadly effect The two races of men LINKS Man's Search For Meaning by Viktor Frankl Tara Brach’s article “Tea with Mara”

86 MINAPR 11
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Viktor Frankl - Man's Search For Meaning

Staying Safe on the Road

They say courtesy is not so common anymore - this seems to be especially true on the road. As I start to teach my son how to drive, I’ve been noticing that even some of the most experienced adult drivers are no longer driving in the kind of courteous and safe manner most likely to avoid both accidents and tickets. In this episode of the podcast I summarize a few principles about safe driving, and offer my insights as both a former police officer and attorney into some of the top ways to stay safer on the road, including how to avoid and deal with road rage. I hope you enjoy this episode about the purpose in the process of staying safe on the road! Resources: Tips for keeping young drivers off cell phones NHTSA’s Crash Stats site AAA’s road rage brochure

27 MINAPR 1
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Staying Safe on the Road

10-Minute Takeaways Bonus Episode: Finding Your Calling

Have you ever wondered if you have found your true calling? What even makes something a “calling” anyways? In this short “10-minute take-aways” bonus episode, we summarize a process that might be useful for you when considering these questions. What I like best about this particular process is that it also helps you identify the type of changes that might be needed to get yourself positioned into a new and more meaningful direction. This is hardly a new process, but lately I’ve found myself explaining it to a few people and so I thought it would be something my audience would enjoy learning more about. I hope you enjoy this bonus episode about the purpose in the process of finding your calling!

11 MINMAR 23
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10-Minute Takeaways Bonus Episode: Finding Your Calling

Joe Villarreal - Stories From the Road

If you’re a life-long learner, you will undoubtedly create a lot of stories. The more careers, jobs, skills, and new circumstances you experience, the more people you will cross paths with. But, at the end of the day, who are those stories really for? My friend and fellow polymath Joe Villarreal joined me in this episode for a wide-ranging discussion about the importance of surrendering our own hopes and fears to experience the joy and fulfillment that comes from living a life in the eternal space we know only as “now”…and the importance of sharing what we experience in that space with others. Joe and I discussed: Why it’s important to embrace who you are The need for change agents How to know what to do next (or, “letting the bubbles land”) What does it mean to have “now” faith? The necessity of surrender How we can often get lost in our own “joy creation” Why regret and hesitation must be “removed from the equation” Why our own happiness is also our own responsibility...

92 MINMAR 18
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Joe Villarreal - Stories From the Road

Will Blackman - Breaking the Outer Man

In Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life, author Richard Rohr builds on psychologist Carl Jung’s description of a process by which we let go of who we think we are supposed to be, and start to more accurately express our “true” selves. Rohr, a Franciscan Priest, adds a spiritual perspective to Jung’s framework of first half and second half life experiences, concluding that “Your True Self is who you objectively are from the beginning, in the mind and heart of God.” This is, of course, hardly a view unique to the Christian faith. As Rohr points out, Zen Buddhists have since long ago referred to the true self as “the face you had before you were born.” Rohr’s “second half” spiritual discovery of a true self requires what he calls a “downward process” brought on by a divinely placed “stumbling stone,” resulting in the paradoxically necessary process of self-surrender. Rohr is not alone in his application of scripture, church history, and experience to reach the conclusion that we often stand in our own way when it comes to experiencing all that God has in store for us. “Sooner or later a servant of God discovers that he himself is the greatest frustration of his work.” So wrote Watchman Nee (1903-1972), an early 20th century church leader and teacher who died in a Chinese prison after 20 years of incarceration for his faith. Similar to Rohr’s “downward process,” Nee explains in The Breaking of the Outer Man and the Release of the Spirit that our lives inevitably require the breaking of an outer veneer to release the “true” spirit inside each of us. Author John Eldredge, in his popular book Wild At Heart, similarly writes that “In order to take a man into his wound, so that he can heal it and begin the release of the true self, God will thwart the false self. He will take away all that you’ve leaned upon to bring you life.” As Eldredge explains, the process of taking off a mask worn for a lifetime can sometimes be a painful one. So, what’s the point - is this just about building a better “you”? It can end there - but it doesn’t have to. There’s so much more to it than that. Unlike typical “self-help” practices, which make no apologies for perfecting and improving as a means to itself, what Christian authors like Nee, Rohr, and Eldridge all describe in the “breaking” process is not merely a journey of self-improvement for the purpose of “bettering ourselves.” While certainly greater peace and contentment may come from a better understanding of our true nature, Nee explains that by virtue of this journey God “wants to prepare a way to bring His blessing to the world through those who belong to Him.” In other words, it turns out that in finding ourselves (and hence our unique purpose) we will eventually realize, as Rick Warren writes in the first line of The Purpose Driven Life, that “It’s not about you.” Then, who is it about? Answering that question may first require you to reimagine your concept, or description, of God. Is it possible that in the process of helping you to discover your own “true self,” God will also be revealing something to you something about who He is? In addition to becoming a greater blessing to the world, as Nee describes, is it possible that God also wants you to be a blessing to Him? What if it’s just as important to consider not only what God wants for you, but why he wants that, for you? We can often think of prayer (and even faith practices more broadly) as ways by which we discover God’s will for our lives, get answers, obtain guidance, make divine requests, intercede for others, and try to learn more about our purpose. All good things! But what if God might also have something to relate to each of us individually - about himself? What if, by breaking our outer man, we might also learn more not just about our own heart, but also about God’s heart for each of us? If we truly believe that God is both immanent and transcendent (totally unfathomable and yet intensely knowable)

61 MINMAR 4
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Will Blackman - Breaking the Outer Man