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Design Thinking 101

Dawan Stanford

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Design Thinking 101
Design Thinking 101

Design Thinking 101

Dawan Stanford

17
Followers
0
Plays
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Design Thinking 101: Learning, Leading, and Applying Design ThinkingDesign Thinking 101 helps listeners learn about design-driven innovation, connect design thinking to strategy and action, and explore learning from challenges overcome while applying design thinking and related innovation approaches. You'll hear design practitioners' stories, lessons, ideas, resources, and tips. Our guests share insights on how to deliver results with design thinking in business, social innovation, education, design, government, healthcare and other fields.

Latest Episodes

Speculative Design + Designing for Justice + Design Research with Alix Gerber — DT101 E27

Welcome to the Design Thinking podcast! I’m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I’m interviewing Alix Gerber. She’s currently a Visiting Assistant Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, and has been developing and teaching courses there, such as Radical Design, where undergraduate students imagine alternatives to civic experiences like policing, capitalism, or voting. During our conversation, we talk about speculative design, designing for justice in Ferguson, Missouri, teaching radical design, and how her practice and teaching have influenced her as a design researcher. Alix is a design researcher who works with people to visualize and enact the futures we imagine, provoking discussion around how our society could be more equitable and meaningful. Alix has worked with residents of Harlem, New York, and Ferguson, Missouri, to explore alternatives to our current policing and court systems by making artifacts from divergent futures. She grew up in a family of designers; both of her parents as well as her brother have all chosen careers in design. She enjoys learning from her students when teaching her Designing Creativity: Innovation Across Disciplines class at Washington University. Alix is always learning and restructuring her teaching method to create a better learning experience for the students in her class, and working to design real life experiences for her students to learn from at the university. Today, we explore Alix’s design career path from her start while attending Cornell University, and then following her design experience and growth through several different design types and projects during the last eight years of her career. Alix explains the different types of design she has used, when each type of design worked well in a project, and how the design tools she uses are applied in design thinking. We’ll also dig into her teaching assignment, where Alix instructs undergraduate students on social design issues, and on understanding the impacts of different design perspectives on society. Learn More About Today’s Guest Alix Gerber on LinkedIn Designing Civic Experiences In This Episode [01:26] How Alix started her career with taking human-centered design at Cornell. [03:00] Her shift to design with social problems, her shift to graduate schools and why she wanted this shift. [03:57] Alix’s time at Parsons and studying transdisciplinary design. [05:25] Types of projects she participated in when studying transdisciplinary design.[07:25] Speculative design and how this differs from problem-focused design. [09:01] How she assists clients with a speculative design project. [11:45] Framing alternative problems in a design project. [14:53] Alix’s work in Ferguson - how her work started and developed. [19:18] Speculative design tools Alix uses in everyday work on her projects. [21:14] How Alix defines radical design within design thinking and what she is teaching at Washington University. [27:44] Light bulb moments for students in context to understanding the user experience. [29:44] What Alix does to assist her students when they are struggling with ideas in class. [29:44] Using radical and speculative design and her work projects in relation to how they influence Alix as a design researcher. [39:45] What Alix would like to be practicing over the next few years based on her cumulative experiences in design. Links and Resources Email Alix at designradicalfutures@gmail.com Washington University in St. Louis Design Thinking at Work The Reflective Practitioner by Donald Schon Innovation with Information Technologies in Healthcare Designing Radical Futures Instagram Tag #radicalcivics Parsons School of Design IA Collaborative Lab at OPM Introduction to Speculative Design Practice Elliot Montgomery, Assistant Professor of Strategic Design and Management Extrapolation Factory Extrapolation Factory Operator's Manual Neighborhood Policing Steering Committee (NPSC) Ferguson, MO Alix learned about non-reformist refo

43 MIN2 weeks ago
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Speculative Design + Designing for Justice + Design Research with Alix Gerber — DT101 E27

Public Sector Design + Outcome Chains + Prototyping for Impact with Boris Divjak — DT101 E26

Welcome to the Design Thinking podcast! I’m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I’m interviewing Boris Divjak. He is a service designer and strategist based in the U.K., with 13 years of experience in creating digital services. He leads and advises teams on digital innovation projects in complex environments, such as local authorities and healthcare organizations, as well as commercial enterprises. Boris collaborates closely with clients in all stages of the innovation process, from initial customer research and co-design workshops through to developing a live service. He works best in an agile environment, where iterative improvements and open communication help guide the team towards a shared goal. Boris has been working in the public sector for the last few years; his current focus is on creating better public services outcomes and using service design and design thinking to deliver solutions to social problems. Today we explore Boris’s path from his career start in visual design, which led him into web design and from there, finding his way to service design. Boris explains his perspective on service design, and what types of models and prototypes he uses when he is designing. He also talks about how companies can take a look at a series of changes to understand how their products have an impact on the public sector, and how companies can connect their work to specific outcomes to be more confident in their product output. From his beginnings in a small startup in technology to his current position as a service designer, Boris talks about his experiences with service design, from client engagement to the characteristics he believes the ideal project advocate should have. We’ll also dig into his project, Prototyping for Impact, which offers a toolkit that anyone involved in innovation - in both the public and private sectors - can use to guide their innovation process. Boris tells us more about the project’s purpose and what he hopes the project will accomplish. Learn More About Today’s Guest Prototyping for Impact Unboxed NESTA NESTA Levels of Evidence Report Prototyping for Impact in Healthcare appeared in Touchpoint Volume 10 No. 3 October 2018, The Journal of Service Design In This Episode [01:32] How Boris got started and how his career trajectory played out. [03:23] Challenges in moving from visual design to a service design career. [06:20] Boris’s unique perspective of service design, and his design process. [09:30] The relationship between work and outcomes.[11:03] How outcomes chain together to make change. [14:45] The need for having evidence to support your outcomes, and what assumptions can be made from outcomes. [20:02] How Boris encourages client interest and client participation in service design. [24:38] The characteristics of the ideal project advocate. [26:45] How to work with clients who have deep institutional knowledge, and thus have the ability to shift the energy of the group. [27:14] Boris gives details on his Prototyping for Impact project. [31:49] Boris talks about experiences, books, and information that assisted him in service design. [34:40] How you can contact Boris and get more information about his current work and projects. Links and Resources Design Thinking at Work The Reflective Practitioner by Donald Schon Innovation with Information Technologies in Healthcare

39 MINMAY 28
Comments
Public Sector Design + Outcome Chains + Prototyping for Impact with Boris Divjak — DT101 E26

Healthcare Design Dynamics + Design Team Formation with Steve Reay — DT101 E25

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 Podcast! I’m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I’m interviewing Steve Reay. Steve is currently director of Good Health Design, a collaborative design studio at Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand. He is affiliated with the Designers Institute of New Zealand. Steve's research focuses on how the design of products and services may have a positive impact on people's health and well-being. Today we explore Steve’s path from scientist to his role as the director of Good Health Design. Good Health Design enables designers to engage with clinical experts, healthcare professionals as well as researchers from other disciplines, to share and test ideas and develop unique solutions. We dive deep into team creation, what factors are important in team creation and which details are important particularly in the healthcare industry. SSteve and I talk about the reality of design thinking in healthcare, what makes the most successful projects successful, and how one of the factors to a successful project is how people work together. The type of time it takes in order to build a successful team. We’ll also dig into his project, Initiate.Collaborate: a new collaborative project can often feel like stepping into the unknown with an ongoing learning curve, a clash of worlds and perspectives within constraining systems and structures. Initiate.collaborate is a card game that is fun and enables responsive and responsible collaborations. Learn More About Today’s Guest Steve Reay’s Profile Initiate.Collaborate Design for Health & Wellbeing Lab Good Health Design In This Episode [01:43] We hear about Steve’s background, and his experiences which led to where he is today. [02:58] What Steve carried over from his career as a scientist to his career as a designer. [04:21] Steve’s first projects in the healthcare space. [07:42] How Steve finds the right people for his project teams. [09:26] Relationships and how they make successful projects. [12:07] Steve’s advice on what to look for when creating a design team in the healthcare organization team. [14:35] What different qualities design teams should have to be successful. [18:37] Bringing community work into the healthcare field and working in community projects. [22:38] Steve’s thoughts on design thinking in relationship to design thinking and discipline formation. [29:29] What Steve is exploring with design thinking. [33:12] Steve’s relationship with his students and how he views the learning journey. [37:02] An example of how Steve’s team worked on design thinking with a client and using a co-design process. [45:54] The excitement which comes along with the initial phase of design thinking. [49:16] Resources Steve uses with his design thinking lab. Links and Resources Design Thinking at Work The Reflective Practitioner by Donald Schon Innovation with Information Technologies in Healthcare

54 MINMAY 14
Comments
Healthcare Design Dynamics + Design Team Formation with Steve Reay — DT101 E25

Latest Episodes

Speculative Design + Designing for Justice + Design Research with Alix Gerber — DT101 E27

Welcome to the Design Thinking podcast! I’m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I’m interviewing Alix Gerber. She’s currently a Visiting Assistant Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, and has been developing and teaching courses there, such as Radical Design, where undergraduate students imagine alternatives to civic experiences like policing, capitalism, or voting. During our conversation, we talk about speculative design, designing for justice in Ferguson, Missouri, teaching radical design, and how her practice and teaching have influenced her as a design researcher. Alix is a design researcher who works with people to visualize and enact the futures we imagine, provoking discussion around how our society could be more equitable and meaningful. Alix has worked with residents of Harlem, New York, and Ferguson, Missouri, to explore alternatives to our current policing and court systems by making artifacts from divergent futures. She grew up in a family of designers; both of her parents as well as her brother have all chosen careers in design. She enjoys learning from her students when teaching her Designing Creativity: Innovation Across Disciplines class at Washington University. Alix is always learning and restructuring her teaching method to create a better learning experience for the students in her class, and working to design real life experiences for her students to learn from at the university. Today, we explore Alix’s design career path from her start while attending Cornell University, and then following her design experience and growth through several different design types and projects during the last eight years of her career. Alix explains the different types of design she has used, when each type of design worked well in a project, and how the design tools she uses are applied in design thinking. We’ll also dig into her teaching assignment, where Alix instructs undergraduate students on social design issues, and on understanding the impacts of different design perspectives on society. Learn More About Today’s Guest Alix Gerber on LinkedIn Designing Civic Experiences In This Episode [01:26] How Alix started her career with taking human-centered design at Cornell. [03:00] Her shift to design with social problems, her shift to graduate schools and why she wanted this shift. [03:57] Alix’s time at Parsons and studying transdisciplinary design. [05:25] Types of projects she participated in when studying transdisciplinary design.[07:25] Speculative design and how this differs from problem-focused design. [09:01] How she assists clients with a speculative design project. [11:45] Framing alternative problems in a design project. [14:53] Alix’s work in Ferguson - how her work started and developed. [19:18] Speculative design tools Alix uses in everyday work on her projects. [21:14] How Alix defines radical design within design thinking and what she is teaching at Washington University. [27:44] Light bulb moments for students in context to understanding the user experience. [29:44] What Alix does to assist her students when they are struggling with ideas in class. [29:44] Using radical and speculative design and her work projects in relation to how they influence Alix as a design researcher. [39:45] What Alix would like to be practicing over the next few years based on her cumulative experiences in design. Links and Resources Email Alix at designradicalfutures@gmail.com Washington University in St. Louis Design Thinking at Work The Reflective Practitioner by Donald Schon Innovation with Information Technologies in Healthcare Designing Radical Futures Instagram Tag #radicalcivics Parsons School of Design IA Collaborative Lab at OPM Introduction to Speculative Design Practice Elliot Montgomery, Assistant Professor of Strategic Design and Management Extrapolation Factory Extrapolation Factory Operator's Manual Neighborhood Policing Steering Committee (NPSC) Ferguson, MO Alix learned about non-reformist refo

43 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Speculative Design + Designing for Justice + Design Research with Alix Gerber — DT101 E27

Public Sector Design + Outcome Chains + Prototyping for Impact with Boris Divjak — DT101 E26

Welcome to the Design Thinking podcast! I’m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I’m interviewing Boris Divjak. He is a service designer and strategist based in the U.K., with 13 years of experience in creating digital services. He leads and advises teams on digital innovation projects in complex environments, such as local authorities and healthcare organizations, as well as commercial enterprises. Boris collaborates closely with clients in all stages of the innovation process, from initial customer research and co-design workshops through to developing a live service. He works best in an agile environment, where iterative improvements and open communication help guide the team towards a shared goal. Boris has been working in the public sector for the last few years; his current focus is on creating better public services outcomes and using service design and design thinking to deliver solutions to social problems. Today we explore Boris’s path from his career start in visual design, which led him into web design and from there, finding his way to service design. Boris explains his perspective on service design, and what types of models and prototypes he uses when he is designing. He also talks about how companies can take a look at a series of changes to understand how their products have an impact on the public sector, and how companies can connect their work to specific outcomes to be more confident in their product output. From his beginnings in a small startup in technology to his current position as a service designer, Boris talks about his experiences with service design, from client engagement to the characteristics he believes the ideal project advocate should have. We’ll also dig into his project, Prototyping for Impact, which offers a toolkit that anyone involved in innovation - in both the public and private sectors - can use to guide their innovation process. Boris tells us more about the project’s purpose and what he hopes the project will accomplish. Learn More About Today’s Guest Prototyping for Impact Unboxed NESTA NESTA Levels of Evidence Report Prototyping for Impact in Healthcare appeared in Touchpoint Volume 10 No. 3 October 2018, The Journal of Service Design In This Episode [01:32] How Boris got started and how his career trajectory played out. [03:23] Challenges in moving from visual design to a service design career. [06:20] Boris’s unique perspective of service design, and his design process. [09:30] The relationship between work and outcomes.[11:03] How outcomes chain together to make change. [14:45] The need for having evidence to support your outcomes, and what assumptions can be made from outcomes. [20:02] How Boris encourages client interest and client participation in service design. [24:38] The characteristics of the ideal project advocate. [26:45] How to work with clients who have deep institutional knowledge, and thus have the ability to shift the energy of the group. [27:14] Boris gives details on his Prototyping for Impact project. [31:49] Boris talks about experiences, books, and information that assisted him in service design. [34:40] How you can contact Boris and get more information about his current work and projects. Links and Resources Design Thinking at Work The Reflective Practitioner by Donald Schon Innovation with Information Technologies in Healthcare

39 MINMAY 28
Comments
Public Sector Design + Outcome Chains + Prototyping for Impact with Boris Divjak — DT101 E26

Healthcare Design Dynamics + Design Team Formation with Steve Reay — DT101 E25

Welcome to the Design Thinking 101 Podcast! I’m Dawan Stanford, your host. Today I’m interviewing Steve Reay. Steve is currently director of Good Health Design, a collaborative design studio at Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand. He is affiliated with the Designers Institute of New Zealand. Steve's research focuses on how the design of products and services may have a positive impact on people's health and well-being. Today we explore Steve’s path from scientist to his role as the director of Good Health Design. Good Health Design enables designers to engage with clinical experts, healthcare professionals as well as researchers from other disciplines, to share and test ideas and develop unique solutions. We dive deep into team creation, what factors are important in team creation and which details are important particularly in the healthcare industry. SSteve and I talk about the reality of design thinking in healthcare, what makes the most successful projects successful, and how one of the factors to a successful project is how people work together. The type of time it takes in order to build a successful team. We’ll also dig into his project, Initiate.Collaborate: a new collaborative project can often feel like stepping into the unknown with an ongoing learning curve, a clash of worlds and perspectives within constraining systems and structures. Initiate.collaborate is a card game that is fun and enables responsive and responsible collaborations. Learn More About Today’s Guest Steve Reay’s Profile Initiate.Collaborate Design for Health & Wellbeing Lab Good Health Design In This Episode [01:43] We hear about Steve’s background, and his experiences which led to where he is today. [02:58] What Steve carried over from his career as a scientist to his career as a designer. [04:21] Steve’s first projects in the healthcare space. [07:42] How Steve finds the right people for his project teams. [09:26] Relationships and how they make successful projects. [12:07] Steve’s advice on what to look for when creating a design team in the healthcare organization team. [14:35] What different qualities design teams should have to be successful. [18:37] Bringing community work into the healthcare field and working in community projects. [22:38] Steve’s thoughts on design thinking in relationship to design thinking and discipline formation. [29:29] What Steve is exploring with design thinking. [33:12] Steve’s relationship with his students and how he views the learning journey. [37:02] An example of how Steve’s team worked on design thinking with a client and using a co-design process. [45:54] The excitement which comes along with the initial phase of design thinking. [49:16] Resources Steve uses with his design thinking lab. Links and Resources Design Thinking at Work The Reflective Practitioner by Donald Schon Innovation with Information Technologies in Healthcare

54 MINMAY 14
Comments
Healthcare Design Dynamics + Design Team Formation with Steve Reay — DT101 E25

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