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Ask the Geographer

Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

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Ask the Geographer

Ask the Geographer

Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

2
Followers
0
Plays
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Podcast by Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

Latest Episodes

How do graphic novels help understanding of natural disasters? Dr Gemma Sou

On September 2017, the biggest storm in Caribbean history, Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico causing 30 billion US dollars in damage. But what happened after the storm passed? In this podcast we’re meeting Dr Gemma Sou, to find out about her research with 16 low-economy Puerto Richan families to discover how they recovered from the Hurricane and its long-term and hidden impacts. We’ll discuss how Dr Sou turned this research into a 20 page graphic novella to tell the story of a fictional family based upon these experiences.

20 MIN2019 AUG 30
Comments
How do graphic novels help understanding of natural disasters? Dr Gemma Sou

How is globalisation changing the countryside? Professor Michael Wood

Globalisation is changing our world as we know it, it’s transforming economies, societies, and the environment. But whilst geographers have long studied its effects in global cities - there’s been little research on the concept of ‘a global countryside’ and the impacts of globalisation on rural spaces. In this podcast we meet Professor Michael Wood from Aberystwyth University. We discuss how migration, trade, and tourism has shaped the rural landscape in England and Wales.

21 MIN2019 AUG 23
Comments
How is globalisation changing the countryside? Professor Michael Wood

How is climate and its science governed in Russia? Dr Jon Oldfield

In this podcast we meet with Dr Jon Oldfield, from the University of Birmingham to discuss geopolitics, the role of Russia as an influential climate actor, and the potential consequences of climate change on this vast and environmentally dynamic country. We’ll be finding out more about his latest research project into Soviet climate science and its intellectual legacies

17 MIN2019 AUG 19
Comments
How is climate and its science governed in Russia? Dr Jon Oldfield

Why is sand a powerful natural resource? Dr Laura Schoenberger

In this podcast, we meet with Laura Schoenberger, we explore how, in countries such as Cambodia, sand mining is contributing to the erosion of estuaries, collapse of riverbanks. Sand is not a renewable resource within human timescales, so what does this mean for our environment and the countries that will suffer the most insecurity as a result of its loss.

11 MIN2019 AUG 16
Comments
Why is sand a powerful natural resource? Dr Laura Schoenberger

How is place-attachment and belonging managed in refugee re-settlement? Sara Kindon and Amber Kale

When refugees re-settle into new communities it can impact sense of belonging, place and home. So how can this be negotiated and managed? In this podcast we’re joined by Sara Kindon and Amber Kale from Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand. We’ll be discussing their research into migration, homliness, belonging and the methods that geographers use to explore these issues through qualitative data.

23 MIN2019 AUG 12
Comments
How is place-attachment and belonging managed in refugee re-settlement? Sara Kindon and Amber Kale

How is creativity produced in the Caribbean? Dr Pat Noxolo

Caribbean creativity has shaped literary, music and dance cultures globally. Alongside this geographers are increasingly looking at what performance can tell us about place, identity and politics. In this podcast we're interviewing Dr Pat Noxolo from the University of Birmingham, to discuss the ways in which Caribbean people deploy creative energy to live with the everyday effects of insecurity, poverty, inequality and violence in this culturally and environmentally unique region.

31 MIN2019 AUG 9
Comments
How is creativity produced in the Caribbean? Dr Pat Noxolo

How does international aid work? Dr Emma Mawdsley

International aid is more than a flow of money. Whilst it’s an economic exchange, it’s also one that shaped by geopolitics and geographical imaginations about place - especially so, in terms of traditional donors and recipients of aid. In this podcast we're joined by Dr Emma Mawdsley to discuss global development, and how international aid really works.

25 MIN2019 AUG 5
Comments
How does international aid work? Dr Emma Mawdsley

What is rural gentrification? Professor Martin Philips

Traditionally, gentrification has been considered a highly urban process, taking place in cities and towns. But gentrification - and its implications for changing landscapes, rising rents, and displacement - take place in rural spaces too. In this podcast, we meet Professor Martin Philips from the University of Leicester to discuss how TV and Media have constructed representations of rural life in Britain, and how often this may belie the realities and challenges of the countryside.

21 MIN2019 AUG 2
Comments
What is rural gentrification? Professor Martin Philips

What do cartoons tell us about global politics? Dr Daniel Hammett

With changing borders, Brexit and Trump it’s an interesting time for global geopolitics. Historically, and even more so in today’s current climate political cartoons are released via newspaper and social media as a commentary on global power relations and nation-hood. In today’s podcast we’re joined by Dr Daniel Hammett from the Department of Geography at the University of Sheffield to discuss what we can learn from such cartoons, the role of humour in political geography and his research into citizenship and geopolitics in Southern Africa.

22 MIN2019 JUL 29
Comments
What do cartoons tell us about global politics? Dr Daniel Hammett

How do we talk about environmental risk? Professor Esther Eidinow

Whilst research and science often provide an explanation on how the world works, the role of concepts such as fate, luck, fortune affect our understandings of risk. In this podcast we speak to Professor Esther Eidinow about the role future scenarios play in our perception of risk.

19 MIN2019 JUL 25
Comments
How do we talk about environmental risk? Professor Esther Eidinow

Latest Episodes

How do graphic novels help understanding of natural disasters? Dr Gemma Sou

On September 2017, the biggest storm in Caribbean history, Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico causing 30 billion US dollars in damage. But what happened after the storm passed? In this podcast we’re meeting Dr Gemma Sou, to find out about her research with 16 low-economy Puerto Richan families to discover how they recovered from the Hurricane and its long-term and hidden impacts. We’ll discuss how Dr Sou turned this research into a 20 page graphic novella to tell the story of a fictional family based upon these experiences.

20 MIN2019 AUG 30
Comments
How do graphic novels help understanding of natural disasters? Dr Gemma Sou

How is globalisation changing the countryside? Professor Michael Wood

Globalisation is changing our world as we know it, it’s transforming economies, societies, and the environment. But whilst geographers have long studied its effects in global cities - there’s been little research on the concept of ‘a global countryside’ and the impacts of globalisation on rural spaces. In this podcast we meet Professor Michael Wood from Aberystwyth University. We discuss how migration, trade, and tourism has shaped the rural landscape in England and Wales.

21 MIN2019 AUG 23
Comments
How is globalisation changing the countryside? Professor Michael Wood

How is climate and its science governed in Russia? Dr Jon Oldfield

In this podcast we meet with Dr Jon Oldfield, from the University of Birmingham to discuss geopolitics, the role of Russia as an influential climate actor, and the potential consequences of climate change on this vast and environmentally dynamic country. We’ll be finding out more about his latest research project into Soviet climate science and its intellectual legacies

17 MIN2019 AUG 19
Comments
How is climate and its science governed in Russia? Dr Jon Oldfield

Why is sand a powerful natural resource? Dr Laura Schoenberger

In this podcast, we meet with Laura Schoenberger, we explore how, in countries such as Cambodia, sand mining is contributing to the erosion of estuaries, collapse of riverbanks. Sand is not a renewable resource within human timescales, so what does this mean for our environment and the countries that will suffer the most insecurity as a result of its loss.

11 MIN2019 AUG 16
Comments
Why is sand a powerful natural resource? Dr Laura Schoenberger

How is place-attachment and belonging managed in refugee re-settlement? Sara Kindon and Amber Kale

When refugees re-settle into new communities it can impact sense of belonging, place and home. So how can this be negotiated and managed? In this podcast we’re joined by Sara Kindon and Amber Kale from Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand. We’ll be discussing their research into migration, homliness, belonging and the methods that geographers use to explore these issues through qualitative data.

23 MIN2019 AUG 12
Comments
How is place-attachment and belonging managed in refugee re-settlement? Sara Kindon and Amber Kale

How is creativity produced in the Caribbean? Dr Pat Noxolo

Caribbean creativity has shaped literary, music and dance cultures globally. Alongside this geographers are increasingly looking at what performance can tell us about place, identity and politics. In this podcast we're interviewing Dr Pat Noxolo from the University of Birmingham, to discuss the ways in which Caribbean people deploy creative energy to live with the everyday effects of insecurity, poverty, inequality and violence in this culturally and environmentally unique region.

31 MIN2019 AUG 9
Comments
How is creativity produced in the Caribbean? Dr Pat Noxolo

How does international aid work? Dr Emma Mawdsley

International aid is more than a flow of money. Whilst it’s an economic exchange, it’s also one that shaped by geopolitics and geographical imaginations about place - especially so, in terms of traditional donors and recipients of aid. In this podcast we're joined by Dr Emma Mawdsley to discuss global development, and how international aid really works.

25 MIN2019 AUG 5
Comments
How does international aid work? Dr Emma Mawdsley

What is rural gentrification? Professor Martin Philips

Traditionally, gentrification has been considered a highly urban process, taking place in cities and towns. But gentrification - and its implications for changing landscapes, rising rents, and displacement - take place in rural spaces too. In this podcast, we meet Professor Martin Philips from the University of Leicester to discuss how TV and Media have constructed representations of rural life in Britain, and how often this may belie the realities and challenges of the countryside.

21 MIN2019 AUG 2
Comments
What is rural gentrification? Professor Martin Philips

What do cartoons tell us about global politics? Dr Daniel Hammett

With changing borders, Brexit and Trump it’s an interesting time for global geopolitics. Historically, and even more so in today’s current climate political cartoons are released via newspaper and social media as a commentary on global power relations and nation-hood. In today’s podcast we’re joined by Dr Daniel Hammett from the Department of Geography at the University of Sheffield to discuss what we can learn from such cartoons, the role of humour in political geography and his research into citizenship and geopolitics in Southern Africa.

22 MIN2019 JUL 29
Comments
What do cartoons tell us about global politics? Dr Daniel Hammett

How do we talk about environmental risk? Professor Esther Eidinow

Whilst research and science often provide an explanation on how the world works, the role of concepts such as fate, luck, fortune affect our understandings of risk. In this podcast we speak to Professor Esther Eidinow about the role future scenarios play in our perception of risk.

19 MIN2019 JUL 25
Comments
How do we talk about environmental risk? Professor Esther Eidinow
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