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Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

13
Followers
15
Plays
Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

13
Followers
15
Plays
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About Us

The Fairbank Center is a world-leading center on China at Harvard University. Listen to interviews on our "Harvard on China" podcast, recordings from our public events, and audio from our archives.

Latest Episodes

Archival and Private Collection in Modern China

Speakers: Katherine Alexander, Assistant Professor of Chinese, University of Colorado at Boulder Riley Brett-Roche, The Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellow (2018); PhD Candidate in History, Stanford University Xiaosong Gao, Director, The Za Library; Associate at the Department of EALC, Harvard University Michael Szonyi, Frank Wen-Hsiung Wu Memorial Professor of Chinese History; Director, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University Chair and Organizer: Xiaofei Tian, Professor of Chinese Literature, Harvard University Please note that part of this recording is in Mandarin Chinese.

91 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Archival and Private Collection in Modern China

Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, with Felix Boecking

"No Great Wall: Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, 1927–1945" (Harvard Asia Center, 2017), an in-depth study of Nationalist tariff policy, fundamentally challenges the widely accepted idea that the key to the Communist seizure of power in China lay in the incompetence of Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalist government. It argues instead that during the second Sino-Japanese War, China’s international trade, the Nationalist government’s tariff revenues, and hence its fiscal policy and state-making project all collapsed. Drawing on the historical lessons of my research, in this talk, I will also discuss the unintended consequences of protectionism, the difficulties of strategising trade wars, and the differences between trade wars and real wars. Felix Boecking is a Senior Lecturer in Modern Chinese Economic and Political History at the University of Edinburgh, UK, and currently a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC. Among his r...

30 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, with Felix Boecking

Craig Allen - US-China Trade Negotiations: No Perpetual Friends or Enemies, Only Perpetual Interests

Speaker: Craig Allen, President, US-China Business Council This event is part of the "China Economy Lecture Series," hosted by Professor Meg Rithmire at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University. On July 26, 2018, Craig Allen began his tenure in Washington, DC, as the sixth President of the United States-China Business Council (USCBC), a private, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing over 200 American companies doing business with China. Prior to joining USCBC, Craig had a long, distinguished career in US public service. Craig began his government career in 1985 at the Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration (ITA). He entered government as a Presidential Management Intern, rotating through the four branches of ITA. From 1986 to 1988, he was an international economist in ITA’s China Office. In 1988, Craig transferred to the American Institute in Taiwan, where he served as Director of the American Trade Center in Taipei. He held this position until 1992, when he returned to the Department of Commerce for a three-year posting at the US Embassy in Beijing as Commercial Attaché. In 1995, Craig was assigned to the US Embassy in Tokyo, where he served as a Commercial Attaché. In 1998, he was promoted to Deputy Senior Commercial Officer. In 1999, Craig became a member of the Senior Foreign Service. From 2000, Craig served a two-year tour at the National Center for APEC in Seattle. While there, he worked on the APEC Summits in Brunei, China, and Mexico. In 2002, it was back to Beijing, where Craig served as the Senior Commercial Officer. In Beijing, Craig was promoted to the Minister Counselor rank of the Senior Foreign Service. After a four-year tour in South Africa, Craig became Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia at the US Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration. He later became Deputy Assistant Secretary for China. Craig was sworn in as the United States ambassador to Brunei Darussalam on December 19, 2014. He served there until July 2018, when he transitioned to President of the US-China Business Council. Craig received a B.A. from the University of Michigan in Political Science and Asian Studies in 1979. He received a Master of Science in Foreign Service from Georgetown University in 1985.

85 MINSEP 17
Comments
Craig Allen - US-China Trade Negotiations: No Perpetual Friends or Enemies, Only Perpetual Interests

Wilt Idema - A Second Look at the Precious Scroll of the Red Gauze

Speaker: Wilt L. Idema, Professor of Chinese Literature Emeritus, Harvard University When the Precious Scroll of the Red Gauze was first introduced to the academic world, it was presented as the earliest work in the genre, as its edition was believed to date from the Yuan dynasty (1260-1368). By now it is acknowledged that this edition only dates from the sixteenth century. Both the contents of the story and the printing of the text, however, may well deserve a second look as they lead to intriguing questions about the origins of the genre and its early use.

62 MINSEP 14
Comments
Wilt Idema - A Second Look at the Precious Scroll of the Red Gauze

Ezra Vogel - China and Japan: Facing History

Speaker: Ezra Vogel, Author; Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences Emeritus, Harvard University With brief presentations by: Richard Dyck, former President, Teredyne, Japan Paula Harrell, School of Continuing Studies, Georgetown University Moderator: Elizabeth Perry, Henry Rosovsky Professor of Government; Director, Harvard-Yenching Institute Sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center. Co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, the Harvard-Yenching Institute; the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations

88 MINSEP 11
Comments
Ezra Vogel - China and Japan: Facing History

Why Law Matters in Taiwan, with Margaret K. Lewis

Why does law matter (and why wouldn't it) in Taiwan? Professor Margaret Lewis talks to the "Harvard on China" podcast about law in Taiwan, 'dinosaur judges,' public debates around same-sex marriage, law schools, and Taiwan's upcoming 2020 presidential election. Professor Margaret Lewis’s research focuses on law in mainland China and Taiwan with an emphasis on criminal justice. Professor Lewis has been a Fulbright Senior Scholar at National Taiwan University, a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a Public Intellectuals Program Fellow with the National Committee on United States-China Relations, and a delegate to the US-Japan Foundation's US-Japan Leadership Program. Her publications have appeared in a number of academic journals including the Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, NYU Journal of International Law and Politics, Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law, and Virginia Journal of International Law. She also co-authored the book Challenge to China: How Taiwan Abolished its Version of Re-Education Through Labor with Jerome A. Cohen. Professor Lewis has participated in the State Department’s Legal Experts Dialogue with China, has testified before the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, and is a consultant to the Ford Foundation.Before joining Seton Hall, Professor Lewis served as a Senior Research Fellow at NYU School of Law’s U.S.-Asia Law Institute where she worked on criminal justice reforms in China. Following graduation from law school, she worked as an associate at the law firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton in New York City. She then served as a law clerk for the Honorable M. Margaret McKeown of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Diego. After clerking, she returned to NYU School of Law and was awarded a Furman Fellowship. Professor Lewis received her J.D.,magna cum laude, from NYU School of Law, where she was inducted into the Order of the Coif and was a member of Law Review. She received her B.A.,summa cum laude, from Columbia University and also studied at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing, China. The "Harvard on China" podcast is hosted by James Evans at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University.

31 MINMAY 18
Comments
Why Law Matters in Taiwan, with Margaret K. Lewis

Tiananmen at 30

2019 marks 30 years since the events at Tiananmen Square in Beijing, in June 1989. The Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University discusses the impact of the Tiananmen massacre 30 years later. Speakers: Hao Jian, Professor, Beijing Film Academy Louisa Lim, Senior Lecturer, University of Melbourne; Author, The People’s Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited Wang Dan, Founder and Executive Director of Dialogue China Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History, University of California Irvine Moderator: Rowena Xiaoqing He, Current Member, Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton; Author, Tiananmen Exiles: Voices of the Struggle for Democracy in China

123 MINMAY 10
Comments
Tiananmen at 30

Mandopop: 40 Years of Chinese Popular Music and Culture

Mandopop: 40 Years of Chinese Popular Music and Culture Speakers: GAO Xiaosong 高曉松 FANG Wenshan 方文山 LO Ta-yu 羅大佑 YIN Yue 尹約 Moderated by TIAN Xiaofei 田曉菲 and Li Jie 李潔, sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University. Please note that this recording is in Mandarin Chinese.

120 MINMAY 4
Comments
Mandopop: 40 Years of Chinese Popular Music and Culture

Paul Cohen - My Journey as a Historian of China

Speaker: Paul Cohen, Fairbank Center Associate In his memoir Paul Cohen, one of the West’s preeminent historians of China, traces the development of his work from its inception in the early 1960s to the present, offering fresh perspectives that consistently challenge us to think more deeply about China and the historical craft in general. The book’s title reflects the crucially important disparity between the past as originally experienced and the past as later reconstructed historically, by which point the historian and the world in which he or she lives have both undergone extensive change. This distinction is very much on Cohen’s mind throughout the book. Paul Cohen began his teaching career at the University of Michigan and Amherst College. He then taught for thirty-five years at Wellesley College, where he is Edith Stix Wasserman Professor of Asian Studies and History, Emeritus. He is also a long-time Associate of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University. Cohen’s books include Discovering History in China: American Historical Writing on the Recent Chinese Past (1984); History in Three Keys: The Boxers as Event, Experience, and Myth (1997); Speaking to History: The Story of King Goujian in Twentieth-Century China (2009); and History and Popular Memory: The Power of Story in Moments of Crisis (2014). History in Three Keys was the winner of the 1997 New England Historical Association Book Award and the American Historical Association’s 1997 John K. Fairbank Prize in East Asian History. Cohen’s work has been translated into Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

107 MINAPR 26
Comments
Paul Cohen - My Journey as a Historian of China

从“触摸历史”到“思想操练”——我看五四以及五四研究: Keynote Speech by Chen Pingyuan 陳平原

“From ‘Touches of History’ to ‘Exercises in Thought’: My Views on May Fourth and May Fourth Studies” (从“触摸历史”到“思想操练”——我看五四以及五四研究) Chen Pingyuan 陳平原 (Peking University) presents the second keynote speech at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies' "May 4th @ 100: China and the World" conference. With welcome and opening remarks by Professors David Der-wei Wang (Harvard University) and Olga Lomová (Charles University, Prague). Hosted by Harvard University. Sponsored by: the Chiang Ching-Kuo Center for Sinology; National Taiwan University; the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard; the Harvard University Asia Center; the Harvard-Yenching Institute; and the Harvard Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations Please note that this presentation is in Mandarin.

61 MINAPR 18
Comments
从“触摸历史”到“思想操练”——我看五四以及五四研究: Keynote Speech by Chen Pingyuan 陳平原

Latest Episodes

Archival and Private Collection in Modern China

Speakers: Katherine Alexander, Assistant Professor of Chinese, University of Colorado at Boulder Riley Brett-Roche, The Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellow (2018); PhD Candidate in History, Stanford University Xiaosong Gao, Director, The Za Library; Associate at the Department of EALC, Harvard University Michael Szonyi, Frank Wen-Hsiung Wu Memorial Professor of Chinese History; Director, Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University Chair and Organizer: Xiaofei Tian, Professor of Chinese Literature, Harvard University Please note that part of this recording is in Mandarin Chinese.

91 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Archival and Private Collection in Modern China

Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, with Felix Boecking

"No Great Wall: Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, 1927–1945" (Harvard Asia Center, 2017), an in-depth study of Nationalist tariff policy, fundamentally challenges the widely accepted idea that the key to the Communist seizure of power in China lay in the incompetence of Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalist government. It argues instead that during the second Sino-Japanese War, China’s international trade, the Nationalist government’s tariff revenues, and hence its fiscal policy and state-making project all collapsed. Drawing on the historical lessons of my research, in this talk, I will also discuss the unintended consequences of protectionism, the difficulties of strategising trade wars, and the differences between trade wars and real wars. Felix Boecking is a Senior Lecturer in Modern Chinese Economic and Political History at the University of Edinburgh, UK, and currently a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC. Among his r...

30 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, with Felix Boecking

Craig Allen - US-China Trade Negotiations: No Perpetual Friends or Enemies, Only Perpetual Interests

Speaker: Craig Allen, President, US-China Business Council This event is part of the "China Economy Lecture Series," hosted by Professor Meg Rithmire at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University. On July 26, 2018, Craig Allen began his tenure in Washington, DC, as the sixth President of the United States-China Business Council (USCBC), a private, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing over 200 American companies doing business with China. Prior to joining USCBC, Craig had a long, distinguished career in US public service. Craig began his government career in 1985 at the Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration (ITA). He entered government as a Presidential Management Intern, rotating through the four branches of ITA. From 1986 to 1988, he was an international economist in ITA’s China Office. In 1988, Craig transferred to the American Institute in Taiwan, where he served as Director of the American Trade Center in Taipei. He held this position until 1992, when he returned to the Department of Commerce for a three-year posting at the US Embassy in Beijing as Commercial Attaché. In 1995, Craig was assigned to the US Embassy in Tokyo, where he served as a Commercial Attaché. In 1998, he was promoted to Deputy Senior Commercial Officer. In 1999, Craig became a member of the Senior Foreign Service. From 2000, Craig served a two-year tour at the National Center for APEC in Seattle. While there, he worked on the APEC Summits in Brunei, China, and Mexico. In 2002, it was back to Beijing, where Craig served as the Senior Commercial Officer. In Beijing, Craig was promoted to the Minister Counselor rank of the Senior Foreign Service. After a four-year tour in South Africa, Craig became Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia at the US Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration. He later became Deputy Assistant Secretary for China. Craig was sworn in as the United States ambassador to Brunei Darussalam on December 19, 2014. He served there until July 2018, when he transitioned to President of the US-China Business Council. Craig received a B.A. from the University of Michigan in Political Science and Asian Studies in 1979. He received a Master of Science in Foreign Service from Georgetown University in 1985.

85 MINSEP 17
Comments
Craig Allen - US-China Trade Negotiations: No Perpetual Friends or Enemies, Only Perpetual Interests

Wilt Idema - A Second Look at the Precious Scroll of the Red Gauze

Speaker: Wilt L. Idema, Professor of Chinese Literature Emeritus, Harvard University When the Precious Scroll of the Red Gauze was first introduced to the academic world, it was presented as the earliest work in the genre, as its edition was believed to date from the Yuan dynasty (1260-1368). By now it is acknowledged that this edition only dates from the sixteenth century. Both the contents of the story and the printing of the text, however, may well deserve a second look as they lead to intriguing questions about the origins of the genre and its early use.

62 MINSEP 14
Comments
Wilt Idema - A Second Look at the Precious Scroll of the Red Gauze

Ezra Vogel - China and Japan: Facing History

Speaker: Ezra Vogel, Author; Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences Emeritus, Harvard University With brief presentations by: Richard Dyck, former President, Teredyne, Japan Paula Harrell, School of Continuing Studies, Georgetown University Moderator: Elizabeth Perry, Henry Rosovsky Professor of Government; Director, Harvard-Yenching Institute Sponsored by the Harvard University Asia Center. Co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, the Harvard-Yenching Institute; the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations

88 MINSEP 11
Comments
Ezra Vogel - China and Japan: Facing History

Why Law Matters in Taiwan, with Margaret K. Lewis

Why does law matter (and why wouldn't it) in Taiwan? Professor Margaret Lewis talks to the "Harvard on China" podcast about law in Taiwan, 'dinosaur judges,' public debates around same-sex marriage, law schools, and Taiwan's upcoming 2020 presidential election. Professor Margaret Lewis’s research focuses on law in mainland China and Taiwan with an emphasis on criminal justice. Professor Lewis has been a Fulbright Senior Scholar at National Taiwan University, a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a Public Intellectuals Program Fellow with the National Committee on United States-China Relations, and a delegate to the US-Japan Foundation's US-Japan Leadership Program. Her publications have appeared in a number of academic journals including the Columbia Journal of Transnational Law, NYU Journal of International Law and Politics, Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law, and Virginia Journal of International Law. She also co-authored the book Challenge to China: How Taiwan Abolished its Version of Re-Education Through Labor with Jerome A. Cohen. Professor Lewis has participated in the State Department’s Legal Experts Dialogue with China, has testified before the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, and is a consultant to the Ford Foundation.Before joining Seton Hall, Professor Lewis served as a Senior Research Fellow at NYU School of Law’s U.S.-Asia Law Institute where she worked on criminal justice reforms in China. Following graduation from law school, she worked as an associate at the law firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton in New York City. She then served as a law clerk for the Honorable M. Margaret McKeown of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in San Diego. After clerking, she returned to NYU School of Law and was awarded a Furman Fellowship. Professor Lewis received her J.D.,magna cum laude, from NYU School of Law, where she was inducted into the Order of the Coif and was a member of Law Review. She received her B.A.,summa cum laude, from Columbia University and also studied at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies in Nanjing, China. The "Harvard on China" podcast is hosted by James Evans at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University.

31 MINMAY 18
Comments
Why Law Matters in Taiwan, with Margaret K. Lewis

Tiananmen at 30

2019 marks 30 years since the events at Tiananmen Square in Beijing, in June 1989. The Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University discusses the impact of the Tiananmen massacre 30 years later. Speakers: Hao Jian, Professor, Beijing Film Academy Louisa Lim, Senior Lecturer, University of Melbourne; Author, The People’s Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited Wang Dan, Founder and Executive Director of Dialogue China Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History, University of California Irvine Moderator: Rowena Xiaoqing He, Current Member, Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton; Author, Tiananmen Exiles: Voices of the Struggle for Democracy in China

123 MINMAY 10
Comments
Tiananmen at 30

Mandopop: 40 Years of Chinese Popular Music and Culture

Mandopop: 40 Years of Chinese Popular Music and Culture Speakers: GAO Xiaosong 高曉松 FANG Wenshan 方文山 LO Ta-yu 羅大佑 YIN Yue 尹約 Moderated by TIAN Xiaofei 田曉菲 and Li Jie 李潔, sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University. Please note that this recording is in Mandarin Chinese.

120 MINMAY 4
Comments
Mandopop: 40 Years of Chinese Popular Music and Culture

Paul Cohen - My Journey as a Historian of China

Speaker: Paul Cohen, Fairbank Center Associate In his memoir Paul Cohen, one of the West’s preeminent historians of China, traces the development of his work from its inception in the early 1960s to the present, offering fresh perspectives that consistently challenge us to think more deeply about China and the historical craft in general. The book’s title reflects the crucially important disparity between the past as originally experienced and the past as later reconstructed historically, by which point the historian and the world in which he or she lives have both undergone extensive change. This distinction is very much on Cohen’s mind throughout the book. Paul Cohen began his teaching career at the University of Michigan and Amherst College. He then taught for thirty-five years at Wellesley College, where he is Edith Stix Wasserman Professor of Asian Studies and History, Emeritus. He is also a long-time Associate of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University. Cohen’s books include Discovering History in China: American Historical Writing on the Recent Chinese Past (1984); History in Three Keys: The Boxers as Event, Experience, and Myth (1997); Speaking to History: The Story of King Goujian in Twentieth-Century China (2009); and History and Popular Memory: The Power of Story in Moments of Crisis (2014). History in Three Keys was the winner of the 1997 New England Historical Association Book Award and the American Historical Association’s 1997 John K. Fairbank Prize in East Asian History. Cohen’s work has been translated into Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

107 MINAPR 26
Comments
Paul Cohen - My Journey as a Historian of China

从“触摸历史”到“思想操练”——我看五四以及五四研究: Keynote Speech by Chen Pingyuan 陳平原

“From ‘Touches of History’ to ‘Exercises in Thought’: My Views on May Fourth and May Fourth Studies” (从“触摸历史”到“思想操练”——我看五四以及五四研究) Chen Pingyuan 陳平原 (Peking University) presents the second keynote speech at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies' "May 4th @ 100: China and the World" conference. With welcome and opening remarks by Professors David Der-wei Wang (Harvard University) and Olga Lomová (Charles University, Prague). Hosted by Harvard University. Sponsored by: the Chiang Ching-Kuo Center for Sinology; National Taiwan University; the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard; the Harvard University Asia Center; the Harvard-Yenching Institute; and the Harvard Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations Please note that this presentation is in Mandarin.

61 MINAPR 18
Comments
从“触摸历史”到“思想操练”——我看五四以及五四研究: Keynote Speech by Chen Pingyuan 陳平原