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Learn on the go

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Learn on the go
Learn on the go

Learn on the go

Community Care

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We discuss the latest research, theories and practice issues, and look at what they mean for social workers.

Latest Episodes

Forced marriage of adults with learning disabilities: podcast

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy mean to your practice.This episode is about the forced marriage of adults with learning disabilities and discusses, among other things,the signs to look out for that suggest someone might be at risk of forced marriage and the social work role in safeguarding against it. Answering questions areRachael Clawson, assistant professor of social work at Nottingham university, and Luthfa Khan, forced marriage service lead at Respond. The questions were asked by Natalie Valios, senior content editor for Community Care Inform Adults.

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Forced marriage of adults with learning disabilities: podcast

Child to parent violence

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about child and adolescent to parent abuse. It covers how this form of abuse is defined, what is known about when and why it occurs, how social workers can support families, both when there are specific programmes in place and what they can do themselves. We also explore the links and differences with domestic abuse. Discussing these questions are Helen Bonnick, social worker specialising in this area and Jane Griffiths, parent-child therapist, consultant and trainer. The questions were asked by Joanna Silman content editor at Community Care Inform.Helen Bonnick’s website is holesinthewall.co.uk and her book is Child to Parent Violence and Abuse: a practitioners guide to working with families, Pavilion Publishing, 2019.Jane’s Facebook page for families and professionals is Capauk (https://www.facebook.com/Capauk-1232850886885882/)2:31 – What is child to parent violence and abuse and what do we know about when and why it takes place?9.37 – How can you identify if a family is experiencing ‘normal’ behaviour and boundary pushing. or abuse?13.58 - How should social workers respond and work with families?26.01 – What research says29.55 – Working with different agesCommunity Care Inform subscribers can access additional resources and a written transcript of the podcast: https://www.ccinform.co.uk/learning-tools/child-or-adolescent-to-parent-abuse-podcastAnd if you want to hear more, in 2017 we published an episode of the podcast discussing adoption disruption, with researcher Julie Selwyn and Elaine Dibben from CoramBAAF https://www.spreaker.com/episode/16966372ReferencesBBC (2019)Domestic violence: Child-parent abuse doubles in three yearsBBC News, 7th August 2019Condry R, & Miles C (2014) ‘Adolescent to parent violence: Framing and mapping a hidden problem‘. Criminology & Criminal Justice, 14(3), 257–275.Holt A & Shon P (2016) ‘Exploring Fatal and Non-Fatal Violence Against Parents: Challenging the Orthodoxy of Abused Adolescent Perpetrators‘. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology. 62. 1Holt, A (2015) ‘Adolescent-to-Parent Abuse as a Form of “Domestic Violence”: A Conceptual Review‘. Trauma, violence & abuse. 17Northumberland LSCB (2018)APVA: Briefing note for professionalsWilcox P et al (2015)Responding to Child to Parent ViolenceRCPV, Brighton

32 MINOCT 31
Comments
Child to parent violence

Learn on the go podcast: the Liberty Protection Safeguards

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models, legislation and policy guidance mean to your practice. This episode is about the Liberty Protection Safeguards which will replace Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.Questions were sent in by Inform Adults' subscribers and they cover a variety of issues, including which professionals will be required to carry out assessments and the pre-authorisation review under the LPS; the requirements of care homes; and the role of approved mental capacity professionals. The questions are answered by Tim Spencer-Lane, a lawyer specialising in mental capacity and mental health law, and they are asked by Natalie Valios, senior content editor of Community Care Inform Adults.We apologise for some issues with the sound quality during this podcast.1:40 - Level of training, status in an organisation and/or professional registration for the assessors for each assessment or those making determinations, pre-authorisers, and authorisers.5:26 - Is the pre-authoriser anticipated to be a different person than the person giving the authorisation, or could this be the same person?7:32 - How will managers of care homes who are able to authorise depriving someone of their liberty, if it is indeed the case, be regulated and monitored?9:14 - Will social care staff be expected to monitor every application and countersign before authorisation is granted? And if so, will this role fall to senior staff and managers or any qualified worker involved?10:01 - Who will determine if the person subject to the LPS is objecting? 13:22 - Are local authorities expected to hold a pool of AMCPs that other responsible bodies access?16:11 - The mental health assessment requires evidence of mental disorder. How is that going to be evidenced?18:07 - Will there be guidance to the precise capacity question being assessed? At present there appears a gap between consenting to the accommodation for purpose of care compared to the wider decision care managers often assess, which looks at a person’s ability to choose between the available options.20:12 - Will the length of authorisation differ between DoLS and LPS?22:15 - Will the LPS apply in hospices and if so, will this be the responsibility of the responsible body of where the individual normally resides or the location of the hospice, if they’re different?23:54 - What’s going to happen to the relevant person’s representative role?25:50 - Are there any plans to refine the definition of deprivation of liberty?27:23 - How will the backlog be managed under the LPS?28:59 - What will the role of the Care Quality Commission be in relation to LPS?Community Care Inform subscribers can access additional resources and a written transcript of the podcast: https://adults.ccinform.co.uk/practice-guidance/liberty-protection-safeguards-podcast-transcript/

30 MINOCT 9
Comments
Learn on the go podcast: the Liberty Protection Safeguards

Neglect, poverty and affluence

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about neglect, poverty and affluence. It covers what neglect is, how it might manifest differently depending on the socioeconomic status of a family, and how social work practice can avoid penalising families in poverty for factors beyond their control. Discussing these questions are Claudia Bernard, professor of social work At Goldsmiths, University of London, and Brigid Featherstone, professor of social work at Huddersfield University. The questions were asked by Ruth Hardy, content editor at Community Care Inform.2:04 – What is neglect?3:20 – Are there any links between neglect and the socioeconomic status of a family?6:58 - What assumptions or unconscious biases might social workers have when working with either families who are in poverty or families who are affluent?15:25 - How can social workers avoi...

26 MINJUL 24
Comments
Neglect, poverty and affluence

Social work supervision: can it help children and families?

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about social work supervision. It covers why supervision is important, what good supervision can do, and if supervision can and does make a difference to children and families. Discussing these questions are David Wilkins, senior lecturer in social work at the Cascade Research Centre at Cardiff University, and Tom Stibbs, principal social worker for children and families for Brighton and Hove City Council. The questions were asked by Ruth Hardy, content editor at Community Care Inform.Community Care Inform Children subscribers can access a full written transcript of the episode, plus key learning points and messages from research: https://www.ccinform.co.uk/learning-tools/learn-on-the-go-podcast-social-work-supervision 2:38: Why is supervision important and what should good supervision do?9:07: Does supervisi...

34 MINJUN 17
Comments
Social work supervision: can it help children and families?

Looked-after children and self-harm

Trigger warningThis content discusses issues of self-harm, mental health and suicide.Please take the time to consider your own mental health, and seek support if you need it. In the UK, the Samaritans can be reached for free on 116 123.Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about looked-after children and self-harm. It covers what self-harm is, why looked-after children are more at risk of self-harming, and how social workers can support young people and carers. Discussing these questions are Judith Furnivall, lecturer and consultancy lead at the Centre for Excellence for Children’s Care and Protection at the University of Strathclyde, and Dr Eileen Harkness-Murphy, lecturer at the School of Health and Life Sciences in the University of the West of Scotland. The questions were asked by Ruth Hardy, content editor at Community Care Inform.2:34: Wha...

33 MINMAY 24
Comments
Looked-after children and self-harm

Strengths-based practice in action

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about using strengths-based practice in action. What skills do social workers need for strengths-based practice? How can social workers carry out strengths-based assessments? And how can social work supervisors use a strengths-based approach? Discussing these questions are Tricia Pereira, principal social worker, practitioner development lead for London ADASS and chair of the principal social workers' network; Carmen Colomina, social worker and practice development manager in SCIE, and Samantha Baron, professor of social work at Manchester Metropolitan University. Community Care Inform subscribers can access a written transcript, key points and learning resources on Inform Adullts: https://adults.ccinform.co.uk/learning-tools/learn-on-the-go-podcast-strengths-based-practice-in-action/ References Department of...

40 MINAPR 25
Comments
Strengths-based practice in action

Child sexual abuse: using family work approaches

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and theories mean to your practice.In this episode, we discuss intrafamilial child sexual abuse and how social workers can use techniques from family therapy ("family work") to work with the family together and help with the crisis in the family and issues around communication and family dynamics that a disclosure of sexual abuse is likely to precipitate.The experts are Anna Glinski, deputy director for knowledge and practice development at the Centre for expertise on child sexual abuse, and Peter Bishop, a family therapist who worked with Anna in her previous role as local authority social worker and multi-disciplinary team manager in East Sussex. 1:33 – 06.09: Peter and Anna discuss what is meant by ‘family work’ and how social workers might be able to use key concepts from it in their work generally6.10 – 18.59: Peter explains why these ideas are particularly...

29 MINMAR 15
Comments
Child sexual abuse: using family work approaches

Fabricated or induced illness

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.In this episode, we discuss fabricated or induced illness.The experts are Gretchen Precey, independent social worker, trainer and consultant, and Dr Paul Davis, consultant paediatrician.2:28: Gretchen and Paul talk about what FII is and the kinds of behaviours it can include.8:21: Why are mothers typically the perpetrators of FII? Gretchen and Paul give their opinions.12:04: The experts talk about the signs that FII might be taking place, and why it can be difficult to identify.23:17: Paul discusses how social workers can work with doctors and other professionals.ReferencesDavis, P; Murtagh, U and Glaser, D (2019)‘40 years of fabricated or induced illness (FII): where next for paediatricians? Paper 1: epidemiology and definition of FII‘Archives of Disease in Childhood, Volume 104, No 2, pp110-114Department for Children, Sc...

27 MINFEB 20
Comments
Fabricated or induced illness

Parents with learning disabilities

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.In this episode, we discuss working with parents with learning disabilities.As part of the episode, we went to a peer support group for parents run by the Elfrida Society, a charity which provides a specialist advocacy service for people with learning disabilities. There are excerpts from the discussion among parents with learning disabilities and learning difficulties about their experiences with social workers and how services can improve. And the episode also includes a discussion between Nadine Tilbury, policy officer at Bristol University’s Norah Fry Centre for Disability Studies, and Kate Theodore, lecturer at Royal Holloway and a clinical psychologist who has worked with people with learning disabilities. The questions were asked by Ruth Hardy, content editor at Community Care Inform.1:36 – 8:50: The parents, Nadine...

46 MINJAN 30
Comments
Parents with learning disabilities

Latest Episodes

Forced marriage of adults with learning disabilities: podcast

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy mean to your practice.This episode is about the forced marriage of adults with learning disabilities and discusses, among other things,the signs to look out for that suggest someone might be at risk of forced marriage and the social work role in safeguarding against it. Answering questions areRachael Clawson, assistant professor of social work at Nottingham university, and Luthfa Khan, forced marriage service lead at Respond. The questions were asked by Natalie Valios, senior content editor for Community Care Inform Adults.

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Forced marriage of adults with learning disabilities: podcast

Child to parent violence

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about child and adolescent to parent abuse. It covers how this form of abuse is defined, what is known about when and why it occurs, how social workers can support families, both when there are specific programmes in place and what they can do themselves. We also explore the links and differences with domestic abuse. Discussing these questions are Helen Bonnick, social worker specialising in this area and Jane Griffiths, parent-child therapist, consultant and trainer. The questions were asked by Joanna Silman content editor at Community Care Inform.Helen Bonnick’s website is holesinthewall.co.uk and her book is Child to Parent Violence and Abuse: a practitioners guide to working with families, Pavilion Publishing, 2019.Jane’s Facebook page for families and professionals is Capauk (https://www.facebook.com/Capauk-1232850886885882/)2:31 – What is child to parent violence and abuse and what do we know about when and why it takes place?9.37 – How can you identify if a family is experiencing ‘normal’ behaviour and boundary pushing. or abuse?13.58 - How should social workers respond and work with families?26.01 – What research says29.55 – Working with different agesCommunity Care Inform subscribers can access additional resources and a written transcript of the podcast: https://www.ccinform.co.uk/learning-tools/child-or-adolescent-to-parent-abuse-podcastAnd if you want to hear more, in 2017 we published an episode of the podcast discussing adoption disruption, with researcher Julie Selwyn and Elaine Dibben from CoramBAAF https://www.spreaker.com/episode/16966372ReferencesBBC (2019)Domestic violence: Child-parent abuse doubles in three yearsBBC News, 7th August 2019Condry R, & Miles C (2014) ‘Adolescent to parent violence: Framing and mapping a hidden problem‘. Criminology & Criminal Justice, 14(3), 257–275.Holt A & Shon P (2016) ‘Exploring Fatal and Non-Fatal Violence Against Parents: Challenging the Orthodoxy of Abused Adolescent Perpetrators‘. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology. 62. 1Holt, A (2015) ‘Adolescent-to-Parent Abuse as a Form of “Domestic Violence”: A Conceptual Review‘. Trauma, violence & abuse. 17Northumberland LSCB (2018)APVA: Briefing note for professionalsWilcox P et al (2015)Responding to Child to Parent ViolenceRCPV, Brighton

32 MINOCT 31
Comments
Child to parent violence

Learn on the go podcast: the Liberty Protection Safeguards

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models, legislation and policy guidance mean to your practice. This episode is about the Liberty Protection Safeguards which will replace Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards.Questions were sent in by Inform Adults' subscribers and they cover a variety of issues, including which professionals will be required to carry out assessments and the pre-authorisation review under the LPS; the requirements of care homes; and the role of approved mental capacity professionals. The questions are answered by Tim Spencer-Lane, a lawyer specialising in mental capacity and mental health law, and they are asked by Natalie Valios, senior content editor of Community Care Inform Adults.We apologise for some issues with the sound quality during this podcast.1:40 - Level of training, status in an organisation and/or professional registration for the assessors for each assessment or those making determinations, pre-authorisers, and authorisers.5:26 - Is the pre-authoriser anticipated to be a different person than the person giving the authorisation, or could this be the same person?7:32 - How will managers of care homes who are able to authorise depriving someone of their liberty, if it is indeed the case, be regulated and monitored?9:14 - Will social care staff be expected to monitor every application and countersign before authorisation is granted? And if so, will this role fall to senior staff and managers or any qualified worker involved?10:01 - Who will determine if the person subject to the LPS is objecting? 13:22 - Are local authorities expected to hold a pool of AMCPs that other responsible bodies access?16:11 - The mental health assessment requires evidence of mental disorder. How is that going to be evidenced?18:07 - Will there be guidance to the precise capacity question being assessed? At present there appears a gap between consenting to the accommodation for purpose of care compared to the wider decision care managers often assess, which looks at a person’s ability to choose between the available options.20:12 - Will the length of authorisation differ between DoLS and LPS?22:15 - Will the LPS apply in hospices and if so, will this be the responsibility of the responsible body of where the individual normally resides or the location of the hospice, if they’re different?23:54 - What’s going to happen to the relevant person’s representative role?25:50 - Are there any plans to refine the definition of deprivation of liberty?27:23 - How will the backlog be managed under the LPS?28:59 - What will the role of the Care Quality Commission be in relation to LPS?Community Care Inform subscribers can access additional resources and a written transcript of the podcast: https://adults.ccinform.co.uk/practice-guidance/liberty-protection-safeguards-podcast-transcript/

30 MINOCT 9
Comments
Learn on the go podcast: the Liberty Protection Safeguards

Neglect, poverty and affluence

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about neglect, poverty and affluence. It covers what neglect is, how it might manifest differently depending on the socioeconomic status of a family, and how social work practice can avoid penalising families in poverty for factors beyond their control. Discussing these questions are Claudia Bernard, professor of social work At Goldsmiths, University of London, and Brigid Featherstone, professor of social work at Huddersfield University. The questions were asked by Ruth Hardy, content editor at Community Care Inform.2:04 – What is neglect?3:20 – Are there any links between neglect and the socioeconomic status of a family?6:58 - What assumptions or unconscious biases might social workers have when working with either families who are in poverty or families who are affluent?15:25 - How can social workers avoi...

26 MINJUL 24
Comments
Neglect, poverty and affluence

Social work supervision: can it help children and families?

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about social work supervision. It covers why supervision is important, what good supervision can do, and if supervision can and does make a difference to children and families. Discussing these questions are David Wilkins, senior lecturer in social work at the Cascade Research Centre at Cardiff University, and Tom Stibbs, principal social worker for children and families for Brighton and Hove City Council. The questions were asked by Ruth Hardy, content editor at Community Care Inform.Community Care Inform Children subscribers can access a full written transcript of the episode, plus key learning points and messages from research: https://www.ccinform.co.uk/learning-tools/learn-on-the-go-podcast-social-work-supervision 2:38: Why is supervision important and what should good supervision do?9:07: Does supervisi...

34 MINJUN 17
Comments
Social work supervision: can it help children and families?

Looked-after children and self-harm

Trigger warningThis content discusses issues of self-harm, mental health and suicide.Please take the time to consider your own mental health, and seek support if you need it. In the UK, the Samaritans can be reached for free on 116 123.Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about looked-after children and self-harm. It covers what self-harm is, why looked-after children are more at risk of self-harming, and how social workers can support young people and carers. Discussing these questions are Judith Furnivall, lecturer and consultancy lead at the Centre for Excellence for Children’s Care and Protection at the University of Strathclyde, and Dr Eileen Harkness-Murphy, lecturer at the School of Health and Life Sciences in the University of the West of Scotland. The questions were asked by Ruth Hardy, content editor at Community Care Inform.2:34: Wha...

33 MINMAY 24
Comments
Looked-after children and self-harm

Strengths-based practice in action

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.This episode is about using strengths-based practice in action. What skills do social workers need for strengths-based practice? How can social workers carry out strengths-based assessments? And how can social work supervisors use a strengths-based approach? Discussing these questions are Tricia Pereira, principal social worker, practitioner development lead for London ADASS and chair of the principal social workers' network; Carmen Colomina, social worker and practice development manager in SCIE, and Samantha Baron, professor of social work at Manchester Metropolitan University. Community Care Inform subscribers can access a written transcript, key points and learning resources on Inform Adullts: https://adults.ccinform.co.uk/learning-tools/learn-on-the-go-podcast-strengths-based-practice-in-action/ References Department of...

40 MINAPR 25
Comments
Strengths-based practice in action

Child sexual abuse: using family work approaches

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and theories mean to your practice.In this episode, we discuss intrafamilial child sexual abuse and how social workers can use techniques from family therapy ("family work") to work with the family together and help with the crisis in the family and issues around communication and family dynamics that a disclosure of sexual abuse is likely to precipitate.The experts are Anna Glinski, deputy director for knowledge and practice development at the Centre for expertise on child sexual abuse, and Peter Bishop, a family therapist who worked with Anna in her previous role as local authority social worker and multi-disciplinary team manager in East Sussex. 1:33 – 06.09: Peter and Anna discuss what is meant by ‘family work’ and how social workers might be able to use key concepts from it in their work generally6.10 – 18.59: Peter explains why these ideas are particularly...

29 MINMAR 15
Comments
Child sexual abuse: using family work approaches

Fabricated or induced illness

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.In this episode, we discuss fabricated or induced illness.The experts are Gretchen Precey, independent social worker, trainer and consultant, and Dr Paul Davis, consultant paediatrician.2:28: Gretchen and Paul talk about what FII is and the kinds of behaviours it can include.8:21: Why are mothers typically the perpetrators of FII? Gretchen and Paul give their opinions.12:04: The experts talk about the signs that FII might be taking place, and why it can be difficult to identify.23:17: Paul discusses how social workers can work with doctors and other professionals.ReferencesDavis, P; Murtagh, U and Glaser, D (2019)‘40 years of fabricated or induced illness (FII): where next for paediatricians? Paper 1: epidemiology and definition of FII‘Archives of Disease in Childhood, Volume 104, No 2, pp110-114Department for Children, Sc...

27 MINFEB 20
Comments
Fabricated or induced illness

Parents with learning disabilities

Welcome to Learn on the go, a Community Care Inform podcast where we discuss what the latest research, practice models and policy guidance mean to your practice.In this episode, we discuss working with parents with learning disabilities.As part of the episode, we went to a peer support group for parents run by the Elfrida Society, a charity which provides a specialist advocacy service for people with learning disabilities. There are excerpts from the discussion among parents with learning disabilities and learning difficulties about their experiences with social workers and how services can improve. And the episode also includes a discussion between Nadine Tilbury, policy officer at Bristol University’s Norah Fry Centre for Disability Studies, and Kate Theodore, lecturer at Royal Holloway and a clinical psychologist who has worked with people with learning disabilities. The questions were asked by Ruth Hardy, content editor at Community Care Inform.1:36 – 8:50: The parents, Nadine...

46 MINJAN 30
Comments
Parents with learning disabilities
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