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WPblab - A WordPress Marketing Show

Jason Tucker & Bridget Willard

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WPblab - A WordPress Marketing Show
WPblab - A WordPress Marketing Show

WPblab - A WordPress Marketing Show

Jason Tucker & Bridget Willard

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Followers
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About Us

Jason Tucker is an IT Tech and WordPress Web Developer joined forces with Bridget Willard a Twitter Nerd who both love WordPress answer your WordPress Marketing Questions every week.

Latest Episodes

WordCamp Speakers: The Tool Kit Episode on WPblab

This week on WPblab, Bridget and Jason are going to talk about the tools, tips, and tricks every WordCamp speaker needs to know. You can't always rely upon the tech at a venue -- especially if you plan to repurpose that content later.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.

57 MIN4 days ago
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WordCamp Speakers: The Tool Kit Episode on WPblab

Asking for Reviews for Your WordPress Business w/ Chris Badgett

Asking for reviews is tough. Giving one-star reviews in WordPress has become a joke. So how do you get reviews that actually help your business? In this episode, Bridget and Jason chat with Chris Badgett of LifterLMS. You won't want to miss this one.The WPwatercooler network is sponsored by ServerPress makers of DesktopServer. Be sure to check them out at https://serverpress.com as well as Kinsta at https://kinsta.comIf you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.

60 MIN3 weeks ago
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Asking for Reviews for Your WordPress Business w/ Chris Badgett

Keeping Your Email Marketing Audiences Interested

On this episode, Jason and Bridget talk with Amy Hall on how to build up your mailing list and how to keep your email marketing audience interested.The WPwatercooler network is sponsored by ServerPress makers of DesktopServer. Be sure to check them out at https://serverpress.com as well as VendorFuel at https://vendorfuel.comIf you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you."To anybody watching, stop emailing people that don't want an email from you just so you can say your list is big." Bridget"Website for show; email for dough." AmyHall.BizWhat am I selling?Everything is a sale. No matter what, it's a sale. You're selling attention and time."Even if you're not exchanging money, you want their time." Amy HallThey might not click the button on the email, but it is the system that will feed the purchase, says Amy. They are the moneymaker. They'll see you on social and then go look for the email. Then they will purchase.How do you get people to subscribe?It really has nothing to do with the email provider you choose. It matters more about your website and the emails you're sending.How do you know if you're emailing too much?You email too often when you get a bunch of unsubscribes. Everyone's tolerance is different.How do you get people to attend a show?As much as you can, make the topic known.WPwatercooler is an event. By the time Amy gets the email, for example, she's already planned Thursdays. Send out the event email two weeks before, three days before, and the day before.Bridget suggests using Mailchimp's tagging feature in an audience in order to recruit guests from 2019, 2018, etc.Highlight some of the previous guests and how their business has progressed since they started being on the show, says Amy.“You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” – Jim RohnHow do you get people to subscribe to your list?Anyone who has been on WPwatercooler is manually added to the list. Posting to Facebook isn't a good way to get subscribers, says Amy Hall.What about open rates?Ensure that your headline is engaging and short (30-40 characters)."You need clear, concise, short subject lines." Amy HallHeadlines can be sensational or the same every week "Real Estate News from John Doe." They saw it in their email every week and they came to expect it."There is no formula for it. You have to test it." Amy HallAsking for help is always a good way to get people to open. Also, don't count on people reading the preview text in their email browser of choice. Repeat that copy and the subject line in the body of the email.How to you keep people engaged with email marketing?What is the benefit of being on the show?Personalize, personalize, personalize. Amy says you should sprinkle their first name throughout the body of the email.Ensure that you offer the value propositions (reasons) why someone would want to be on the show. Talk about stats, exclusivity, and the like.Tool or Tip of the WeekThis Tool or Tip of the week is brought to you by VendorFuel. VendorFuel is a next-generation shopping cart plugin that will ignite your eCommerce. Built using AngularJS VendorFuel lets you keep your customers on your website for the entire checkout experience. Start a 90-day free trial now and Ignite Your eCommerce at VendorFuel.com!Bridget loves Beaver Builder so much. She sent a pre-sales client her affiliate link this week. They loved thatAmy loves superhuman.com as an email client. Worth every dollar.Jason recommends Coursera for certifications.Do you have any tools or tips we should know about?We'd love to hear from you. What are your experiences with this subject?Tell us in the comments below.

60 MINSEP 6
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Keeping Your Email Marketing Audiences Interested

How to do marketing for a WordCamp

In this episode, Jason talks with Christiana Mohr and Sé Reed on how they are promoting their upcoming WordCamp.The WPwatercooler network is sponsored by ServerPress makers of DesktopServer. Be sure to check them out at https://serverpress.com as well as Kinsta at https://kinsta.comIf you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.https://www.wpwatercooler.com/sponsors

59 MINSEP 5
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How to do marketing for a WordCamp

The State of the WordPress Ecosystem: Summer Update

In this episode,JasonandBridgettake a small break in their format to chat about developments this week in the WordPress ecosystem. How will these changes affect how plug-in businesses and freelancers market if at all? Tune in.Thank you to our sponsors!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.comas well asKinsta.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Jeff Chandler Leaves WPTavernBridget thinks his editorial voice will be sorely missed.Journalism tries to get both sides whereas editorial content should have opinion.Jason was more intrigued by the use of service accounts for connected services on multi user websites.Both Bridget and Jason wonder who will now provide timely, non-biased WordPress news. “Hot takes on WPwatercooler.com” is still valid news. And, honestly, most of us who comment on WordPress are also Inside Baseball. So, we’re commenting with our own source material.Thanks, Jeff for being awesome for ten years!Bridget’s Trip to MontréalBridget loved WordCamp Montréal. It was extra special because she got to see Breann McDede’s first presentation.Also, it was really neat to see how the WordPress community in Montréal embraces bilingualism. As Michel Bluma says, “#BonjourHi.”I decided to sit in Q&A part of a presentation in French. It's funny to hear words I know: "A-C-F," "Gutenberg," "Custom Post Types." Can't get much more Montreal than that. #BonjourHiPHP 7.5 — P++ Ending Backwards CompatibilityFrom PHP Storm.“P++– The controversy and accusations in PHP Internals over theremoval of short tagsexplicit call-site send-by-ref syntax, and other discussions eventually resulted in an unexpected proposal from Zeev Suraski – create a new PHP dialect. The working name P++ is not accidental here, as Zeev suggests creating a “sister” language, like C++ for C. PHP and P++ are supposed to be developed side by side within a single runtime. In the new P++ it will be possible to implement a lot of revolutionary improvements, to deprecate legacy, and clear things up without thinking about backward compatibility. Since the language would have new branding, it would not have this bad reputation. A “classic” PHP would get all the performance and other non-syntax features but maintain backward compatibility.”Roman PronskiyHow does this affect WordPress?WordPress 5.0 created an unintentional fork, Bridget says, because plugin and theme developers have three choices:Support 5.0Support 4.9.xSupport BothAll of those choices are business resource decisions.Some people say PHP’s decision to possibly abandon backward compatibility won’t affect WordPress. (Click the heading for the PHP storm article.)“1) Shortcodes ≠ short tags2) PHP 7.4 is already in beta and will be released later this year3) This proposal is not suggesting abandoning the main binary. It’s more like a different interpretation mode that would be included with PHP. Everything could still work the same”William EarnhardtCaldera Joins Ninja Forms“That is one partnership that I feel warm in my soul about,” Bridget says. Caldera will continue to be developer-focused and Ninja Forms will stay customer-facing.This isn’t a case where a company is being sold for parts like a WordPress junkyard.“Josh Pollock, who co-founded CalderaWP in 2015 withChristie Chirinos, will bejoining Saturday Driveas VP of Engineer Experience, along with three other employees from the company, bringing Saturday Drive’s total crew number to 25. Chirinos began working as a product manager atLiquid Webearlier this year.”Sarah GoodingAutomattic Buys TumblrBridget thinks Automattic is buying users so they can sell out. She is hoping after the sale of Automattic, Matt Mullenweg will focus on the WordPress Project. This eliminates the c. Maybe Automattic needed t

62 MINSEP 3
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The State of the WordPress Ecosystem: Summer Update

Influencer Marketing: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

In this episode, Bridget and Jason riff on marketing with influencers, affiliate links, and guest bloggers.Thank you to our sponsors!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.comas well asVendorFuel.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Inspiration for This Week’s EpisodeJason totally loves Buffer’s “Science of Social Media” podcast. Herecommends this episodein particular.“You can’t talk about social media without talking about social science.” Bridget WillardWhat is an influencer?There is always someone that everyone looks to whether it’s in a WordPress Meetup or the gorillas in the mountains. Every social group has an influencer. Dynamics change as the groups change and that’s why your marketing budget can be spent more effectively with micro-influencers.Micro-influencers, quotes Jason from Buffer’s episode, those with smaller numbers, have a 8.8% engagement rate. They have quality followers and they have the time to engage. This is the reason why so many WordPress agencies use affiliate marketing.“Influencer marketing is just referral marketing.” Bridget WillardMake Your Own InfluencersThe best way to engage in influencer marketing is to make your own influencers. We all have a sphere of influence of about twelve people. You have super fans who are always sharing your product.Reward and dopamine are totally connected. After you’ve continually trained them by recognizing or rewarding them, they will engage in this behavior more often. The dopamine rush can come before the reward.“Reward and recognize those people who are taking the time to talk about your brand. Those are your influencers.” Bridget WillardInfluencer Marketing in WordPressYour influencers should resonate with your brand and vice versa. The best practice should be to find someone in your target market. Protect your brand. Ensure that person resonates with your core values, in their whole life, not just online.This applies to sponsoring blog posts, speakers at WordCamps, or even volunteers for Make WordPress.“Make sure they are good stewards of your product.” Jason TuckerUse micro-influencers with your content marketing. Instead of paying $2000 for one blog post, pay 20 people $100. You get 20 articles instead of one and that’s almost one every week for six months. Hire your super fans to write guest blog posts on your site. They get the byline, $100, and are happy. You get content to help your SEO efforts. It’s a win-win-win.How do you find your influencers?Find them with how they communicate with you. Are they tweeting about your brand a lot? They may come up to your booth at a WordCamp or talk to you after you speak.Ask them about how they use your product. Allow the conversation to be naturally unfold. Then ask if they would like to participate.“That’s the best person to talk about that subject matter anyhow.” Jason TuckerWhat shouldn’t you do?Avoid Cognitive Dissonance.You shouldn’t go outside of your market domain. Bridget shouldn’t be an influencer for solar panels or HVAC companies, for example. She’s influential in other areas, but not in construction. Chris Lema is a cigar influencer, but not in cannabis.You shouldn’t go after people who just have big numbers. A lot of their followers could be bought. Are their followers your potential customers?Make sure there is no conflict of interest. You don’t want the influencer to degrade your brand.You shouldn’t pay for ghost written reviews. That is disingenuous at best and unethical not to mention against FTC rules.Isn’t it common knowledge that bloggers are paid to tout products or that if you click a link on a blogger’s site to buy a product, the blogger will get a commission?No. Some bloggers who mention products in their posts have no connection to t

61 MINAUG 14
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Influencer Marketing: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

WordPress Marketing: Standing out from the Services Crowd w/ Jason Resnick

This week Jason and Bridget are joined by popular podcast hostJason ResnickfromLive in the Feast. Jason builthis business in WordPress servicesand he has been talking a ton right now about word-of-mouth marketing by standing out in the crowd including niching down in the client space you serve.Thank you to our sponsors!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.comas well asVendorFuel.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.No matter what you do, it has to feel natural to you. This is the main point of this episode. Here are some good ideas but it’s not a rule.How do you not stand out?Definitely don’t be negative. Avoid client shaming online.“They’re paying you to have the expertise and knowledge.” Jason ResnickDon’t go dark after your client accepts your contract and pays them.“Reach out and say ‘hey I’m excited to be working with you, here’s what you can expect over the next few days.” Jason ResnickDon’t be inauthentic or be rude under the guise of authenticity. Don’t try to copy what works for Gary Vaynerchuck, Chris Lema, Ellen DeGeneres, Simon Sinek. Be you. Their methods work for them because it’s their truth.Stand Out by Providing an ExperienceUsing empathy for your customer, not relying upon jargon, makes you a good “technical liason” as Jason Resnick (Rezzz) says. That skillset allowed him to stand out and provide a good experience for them.“Create Memorable Moments.” Jason ResnickRezzz recommends Jay Baer’s bookTalk Triggers. He also talks aboutLaura Elizabethwho helps gather content from her clients by giving them gift cards to a local cafe. It’s onSeason 1 Episode 7of Live in the Feast if you want to listen. These micro moments and celebrations smooth out bumpy spots in the project journey that are inevitable.Stand Out by Being HumanRezzz says we should be human with our clients. Showing your clients that you pay attention to their interests (like buying them tickets for a minor league baseball game with their son who loves baseball).Stand Out by Being HelpfulAnswer questions on Twitter, LinkedIn, or wherever. There is an attitude that people should just search for their answers on Google. But the uneducated will get so many choices. You’ll get too much information.Stand Out with Your Online PresenceYour website should look good and represent you well, so that when people talk about you that word-of-mouth referral doesn’t die at your URL.Rezzz’ Services Pageis an excellent example of clear pricing and communication to the client.Stand Out by Hosting a PodcastRezzz has six seasons ofLive in the Feast. He decided to create seasons about a business topic. It takes a bit more planning to create the season’s story arch. The seasons create binge-able and helpful content. Since Rezzz isn’t a long-form writer, much like our friendCarl Alexander, he decided a podcast was the right solution.Tool or Tip of the WeekThis Tool or Tip of the week is brought to you by VendorFuel. VendorFuel is a next-generation shopping cart plugin that will ignite your eCommerce. Built using AngularJS VendorFuel lets you keep your customers on your website for the entire checkout experience. Start a 90-day free trial now and Ignite Your eCommerce atVendorFuel.com!Bridget likesTiny Habits— the book by Jonathan Wold.Jason Resnick (Rezzz) likesBonjoro— you can send personalized videos to your clients and friends.Jason is in onShortcuts App(which will be part of iOS13) and theReddit Subthread.Do you have any tools or tips we should know about?We’d love to hear from you. What are your experiences with this subject?Tell us in the comments below.

59 MINAUG 14
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WordPress Marketing: Standing out from the Services Crowd w/ Jason Resnick

Separating Your Identity from Your Product w/ Cory Miller

EIn this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined byCory Millerfor a discussion on creation versus identity.As product creators, how do you separate your identity from your product? Why does it matter? When you sell your product, who are you? With all of the acquisitions that are happening now, this is an important factor in the WordPress ecosystem both financially and mentallyThank you to our sponsor!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.comas well asPeepSo.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40 minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Product Acquisitions in WordPressPantheon recently bought Staging Pilot. Of course we know aboutLiquid Web buying iThemesandGenesis being bought by WPEngine. So, how does this affect product creators?The hardest thing, though, was leaving the team, not the product. He’ll always be attached to the brand, but it’s really about the people.“Some of my best friends in life were on [the iThemes] team.” Cory MillerIf it works for you, go for venture capital. But have some balance with your sweat and actual equity. It’s a big deal to be responsible for someone else’s paycheck.“Always use somebody else’s money.”Cory MillerHow do you separate yourself from your creation?Bridget set up the context of this discussion with a quote from the Game of Thrones co-writer.“…I was very attached to the words I wrote, because I wrote them. It’s like a part of me. If I don’t like these, I don’t like me.”D.B. Weiss,Creative Brain on NetflixCory Miller says his startup was like a baby and for the first few years there were a lot of diaper changes. He brought it through infancy to kindergarten. He recognizes that it’s been a while since he felt those original growing pains.“Up until now, I never saw myself as a creator… but Gosh the parallels are compelling.” Cory Miller“When you build something whether it’s with your hands or your blood, sweat equity, …you do feel so woven into that.”Cory MillerBuild the life and the work you want.The main question you, as a creator, need to ask yourself is this: how painful is it to do everything yourself? Or — how much joy do you have working alone. You can work alone. Build that life. But if you want to build a company, then you have to delegate and/or outsource.We should not feel guilty for outsourcing tasks to others whether it’s housekeeping, development, marketing, or support.How do you stop being a Micromanaging Creator?Cory talks about Assembly Line leadership to get productivity. Throwing more people at problem isn’t more effective. If you care about people, they’ll care about you.“When it comes to leadership, it’s one simple skill: care.” Cory MillerIn the creator mindset, it’s very hard to delegate, Cory says, because they are craftspeople at heart. And that is a tough situation when it comes to delegation.Jason reminds us that having a branding guide is a good way to communicate the persona to others the way thatJen Millerand I do for our blogging and social media clients. They’re trusting us to represent them. The brand should always come first in a company — even over its creator. This allows people to be cross-trained, even in small companies, so the employees can go on vacation.It needs to be psychologically safe in your organization for team members to make decisions with the values in mind. You need to be okay with that.(ReadChapter 3 on Teams from this book. It’s worth it.)“Do they feel safe to make a decision?” Cory MillerLeaving a Team to A New DuckHow do you feel about handing over a team to a new duck to imprint upon? For Cory, he trusted Matt entirely. He knew his team would play their own songs. He is so proud that they can operate without him.Be a leader through crisis and change.Some people may choose to not continue.Communicate the positives of

54 MINJUL 10
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Separating Your Identity from Your Product w/ Cory Miller

Marketing Managed WordPress Hosting in a Saturated Market

In this episode, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard were joined by Jeff Matson from Pagely's NorthStack. He gave insight into Managed WordPress, WordPress Hosting, and Managed AWS Service.Thank you to our sponsor!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored by ServerPress makers of DesktopServer. Be sure to check them out at https://www.serverpress.com as well as PeepSo.If you're interested in sponsoring the 40 minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Stop Getting Cheep-A$$ HostingWordPress hosting matters. Hosting is hosting is hosting until it's not. When it comes to your "hobby," if you take it seriously, it has the potential to become your career.It seems like WordPress hosting is saturated, but it's really not. Pagely was the first to create Wordpress Managed hosting back in the day. You can hear Joshua Strebel talk about the last ten years in his WordCamp Phoenix talk.So, how do we convince content creators, bloggers, and non-inside baseball writers to think good hosting is important?When you pay for $5 hosting, you get $5 hosting. They're digital slumlords, Bridget says in jest. If the support folks are getting paid minimum wage ($7 something in VA), the Five Dollar Host loses money every time one of their customers calls."Even if they are getting paid minimum wage, if they talk to you for an hour, the company lost money on you." Jeff MatsonBridget spends $25 a month on Pressable and thinks that's a reasonable amount for anyone to spend. To her, it matters that the company she chooses has a reputation of treating their employees well."I don't want to use a service that has a big turnover. If they can't keep their employees, they have internal issues." Bridget WillardHobbyists Learn Everything When Their Sites Blow UpIt's true. When your blog gets notices, as Jason points out, and all of a sudden you're getting traffic, your site may not be able to handle that. Managed hosts will scale the traffic.Do you want to learn the hard way? Your hobby or small business needs to value website hosting."You teach them that their business is important." Jeff MatsonYou don't need more web hosting than your site requires, especially if you're getting only 20 hits a week. But with something like a managed service, you can scale up and then down when you need it.What do you get with Managed WordPress Hosting?If you're in the $250 a month or $25 a month plan, when you pay for managed WordPress hosting, you're paying for support. Larger fees at the front pay for concierge-level service. Jeff recalls how Pagely had top-tier folks in their slack helping with Gravity Forms site migrations at midnight. That's the kind of service you get with top-tier Managed WordPress Hosting.Why not run your own box?You could run your own DigitalOcean box, but why? If you're running your own box, you have to do all of the security maintenance, patches, and updates. Also, if you're facing a DDOS attack, you have to face those trials, too.Almost any level of business should outsource these types of things so they can focus on working on your business."Is that really what you want to spend your billable hours on?" Bridget WillardSo, the perfect solution between running your own box and buying high-end Managed WordPress hosting is managed AWS service.What is a Managed AWS Service?With NorthStack, Pagely is bringing the same level of product without the support. You can get a fast site that scales when someone posts your article to Reddit."It's an unbelievable product to host your sites on without all the extra stuff that you might not need." Jeff MatsonThis is made for developers who use GitHub and CLI to create apps and build sites. For now, that's where NorthStack is focusing. You pay for the amount of resources you're using instead of a general bucket. Automated deployments for the win.This product better suited for small to enterprise agenc

51 MINJUN 12
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Marketing Managed WordPress Hosting in a Saturated Market

Marketing Yourself as a WordPress Developer

Marketing yourself as a WordPress developer is challenging, especially when starting out. In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined byRachelle Wise of Wise Artsto brainstorm some solutions.Join us on this episode of WPblab by visiting ourParticipant guidelinespage.Thank you to our sponsor!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.com.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40 minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Networking through WordPress MeetupsRachelle used to be part of her local WordPress Meetups and WordCamps when she lived in Minnesota. So when she moved here to California, she looked it up and lo and behold she found theOC WordPress Meetup, where she met Bridget and Jason.Often, attending WordPress Meetups is an excellent way to get work, said Jason, who was reminded about the way Steve runs the general meetup where a lot of new users show up. Steve would suggest that those who need help meet a developer. Mostly, they would want to hire.Rachelle didn’t get work that way directly but still sees the value of Meetups, especially since one works alone.“I’ve definitely given a lot of free advice; not any paid stuff yet.” Rachelle WiseWordCamps and Meetups are brand awareness campaigns in the sense that you are meeting people and reminding them that you are in business or still in business. Keeping top of mind is important with any business.Think about speaking. Even Jason Tucker tells attendees of Whittier WordPress Meetup to build something then teach people how you did it, what you learned, and what you would do better next time.MarketingWise ArtsSo FarRachelle has done quite a bit of instinctual marketing so far. She hasn’t done any paid ads yet. She started working at an agency then worked as a sole developer for an agency. Once she became a remote worker, she was never going back.After the sole developer gig devolved, she reached out to former contacts at the agency and she got several contracts through that.“Eighty to ninety percent of my work is referral based. I meet someone I do a project for them, they tell their friends… I end up getting these amazing chains of referrals.” Rachelle WiseThe Magic Word is ReferralsMost businesses works on referrals and that’s why brand awareness is so important, Bridget reminds Jason and Rachelle. Being on shows, having Twitter and social media accounts matter. If referrals are your biggest source (your audience) then going to WordPress Meetups matters most.“Referral marekting is marketing.” Bridget WillardDon’t burn bridges. Keep lines of communication open. If you decline work, refer instead.The thing about referral work is people often build a thing, put up a landing page and that’s it. At some point, you’re going to exhaust your first circle. You do that through marketing whether it’s social marketing or paid marketing orin-person events like Ross Gile does with Chamber of Commerces.How should a beginner developer market himself?“You have to build something. Please build something.” Jason TuckerSet up aGitHub account.Set upCodePen account.Go throughFreeCodeCamp.org. It makes you build projects that can be used on your portfolio.Spend time on LinkedIn and keep it updated.Call yourself a website builder.Do pro-bono work to build your portfolio.Case studies with screenshots are better than just links.Videos to show specific functionality is great.Build your own website and maintain it.Pick at niche then go to a trade show. Build landing pages for that niche.Have business cards to hand out.Go to WordCamps and WordPress Meetups.Go to Javascript or WooCommerce Meetups.“Build your site on WordPress.com; it’s better than WIX.” Bridget WillardHow do you get free work?“Find someone that looks like they need help.” Rachelle WiseTry approaching local pizza places or nonpr

60 MINMAY 27
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Marketing Yourself as a WordPress Developer

Latest Episodes

WordCamp Speakers: The Tool Kit Episode on WPblab

This week on WPblab, Bridget and Jason are going to talk about the tools, tips, and tricks every WordCamp speaker needs to know. You can't always rely upon the tech at a venue -- especially if you plan to repurpose that content later.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.

57 MIN4 days ago
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WordCamp Speakers: The Tool Kit Episode on WPblab

Asking for Reviews for Your WordPress Business w/ Chris Badgett

Asking for reviews is tough. Giving one-star reviews in WordPress has become a joke. So how do you get reviews that actually help your business? In this episode, Bridget and Jason chat with Chris Badgett of LifterLMS. You won't want to miss this one.The WPwatercooler network is sponsored by ServerPress makers of DesktopServer. Be sure to check them out at https://serverpress.com as well as Kinsta at https://kinsta.comIf you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.

60 MIN3 weeks ago
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Asking for Reviews for Your WordPress Business w/ Chris Badgett

Keeping Your Email Marketing Audiences Interested

On this episode, Jason and Bridget talk with Amy Hall on how to build up your mailing list and how to keep your email marketing audience interested.The WPwatercooler network is sponsored by ServerPress makers of DesktopServer. Be sure to check them out at https://serverpress.com as well as VendorFuel at https://vendorfuel.comIf you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you."To anybody watching, stop emailing people that don't want an email from you just so you can say your list is big." Bridget"Website for show; email for dough." AmyHall.BizWhat am I selling?Everything is a sale. No matter what, it's a sale. You're selling attention and time."Even if you're not exchanging money, you want their time." Amy HallThey might not click the button on the email, but it is the system that will feed the purchase, says Amy. They are the moneymaker. They'll see you on social and then go look for the email. Then they will purchase.How do you get people to subscribe?It really has nothing to do with the email provider you choose. It matters more about your website and the emails you're sending.How do you know if you're emailing too much?You email too often when you get a bunch of unsubscribes. Everyone's tolerance is different.How do you get people to attend a show?As much as you can, make the topic known.WPwatercooler is an event. By the time Amy gets the email, for example, she's already planned Thursdays. Send out the event email two weeks before, three days before, and the day before.Bridget suggests using Mailchimp's tagging feature in an audience in order to recruit guests from 2019, 2018, etc.Highlight some of the previous guests and how their business has progressed since they started being on the show, says Amy.“You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” – Jim RohnHow do you get people to subscribe to your list?Anyone who has been on WPwatercooler is manually added to the list. Posting to Facebook isn't a good way to get subscribers, says Amy Hall.What about open rates?Ensure that your headline is engaging and short (30-40 characters)."You need clear, concise, short subject lines." Amy HallHeadlines can be sensational or the same every week "Real Estate News from John Doe." They saw it in their email every week and they came to expect it."There is no formula for it. You have to test it." Amy HallAsking for help is always a good way to get people to open. Also, don't count on people reading the preview text in their email browser of choice. Repeat that copy and the subject line in the body of the email.How to you keep people engaged with email marketing?What is the benefit of being on the show?Personalize, personalize, personalize. Amy says you should sprinkle their first name throughout the body of the email.Ensure that you offer the value propositions (reasons) why someone would want to be on the show. Talk about stats, exclusivity, and the like.Tool or Tip of the WeekThis Tool or Tip of the week is brought to you by VendorFuel. VendorFuel is a next-generation shopping cart plugin that will ignite your eCommerce. Built using AngularJS VendorFuel lets you keep your customers on your website for the entire checkout experience. Start a 90-day free trial now and Ignite Your eCommerce at VendorFuel.com!Bridget loves Beaver Builder so much. She sent a pre-sales client her affiliate link this week. They loved thatAmy loves superhuman.com as an email client. Worth every dollar.Jason recommends Coursera for certifications.Do you have any tools or tips we should know about?We'd love to hear from you. What are your experiences with this subject?Tell us in the comments below.

60 MINSEP 6
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Keeping Your Email Marketing Audiences Interested

How to do marketing for a WordCamp

In this episode, Jason talks with Christiana Mohr and Sé Reed on how they are promoting their upcoming WordCamp.The WPwatercooler network is sponsored by ServerPress makers of DesktopServer. Be sure to check them out at https://serverpress.com as well as Kinsta at https://kinsta.comIf you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.https://www.wpwatercooler.com/sponsors

59 MINSEP 5
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How to do marketing for a WordCamp

The State of the WordPress Ecosystem: Summer Update

In this episode,JasonandBridgettake a small break in their format to chat about developments this week in the WordPress ecosystem. How will these changes affect how plug-in businesses and freelancers market if at all? Tune in.Thank you to our sponsors!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.comas well asKinsta.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Jeff Chandler Leaves WPTavernBridget thinks his editorial voice will be sorely missed.Journalism tries to get both sides whereas editorial content should have opinion.Jason was more intrigued by the use of service accounts for connected services on multi user websites.Both Bridget and Jason wonder who will now provide timely, non-biased WordPress news. “Hot takes on WPwatercooler.com” is still valid news. And, honestly, most of us who comment on WordPress are also Inside Baseball. So, we’re commenting with our own source material.Thanks, Jeff for being awesome for ten years!Bridget’s Trip to MontréalBridget loved WordCamp Montréal. It was extra special because she got to see Breann McDede’s first presentation.Also, it was really neat to see how the WordPress community in Montréal embraces bilingualism. As Michel Bluma says, “#BonjourHi.”I decided to sit in Q&A part of a presentation in French. It's funny to hear words I know: "A-C-F," "Gutenberg," "Custom Post Types." Can't get much more Montreal than that. #BonjourHiPHP 7.5 — P++ Ending Backwards CompatibilityFrom PHP Storm.“P++– The controversy and accusations in PHP Internals over theremoval of short tagsexplicit call-site send-by-ref syntax, and other discussions eventually resulted in an unexpected proposal from Zeev Suraski – create a new PHP dialect. The working name P++ is not accidental here, as Zeev suggests creating a “sister” language, like C++ for C. PHP and P++ are supposed to be developed side by side within a single runtime. In the new P++ it will be possible to implement a lot of revolutionary improvements, to deprecate legacy, and clear things up without thinking about backward compatibility. Since the language would have new branding, it would not have this bad reputation. A “classic” PHP would get all the performance and other non-syntax features but maintain backward compatibility.”Roman PronskiyHow does this affect WordPress?WordPress 5.0 created an unintentional fork, Bridget says, because plugin and theme developers have three choices:Support 5.0Support 4.9.xSupport BothAll of those choices are business resource decisions.Some people say PHP’s decision to possibly abandon backward compatibility won’t affect WordPress. (Click the heading for the PHP storm article.)“1) Shortcodes ≠ short tags2) PHP 7.4 is already in beta and will be released later this year3) This proposal is not suggesting abandoning the main binary. It’s more like a different interpretation mode that would be included with PHP. Everything could still work the same”William EarnhardtCaldera Joins Ninja Forms“That is one partnership that I feel warm in my soul about,” Bridget says. Caldera will continue to be developer-focused and Ninja Forms will stay customer-facing.This isn’t a case where a company is being sold for parts like a WordPress junkyard.“Josh Pollock, who co-founded CalderaWP in 2015 withChristie Chirinos, will bejoining Saturday Driveas VP of Engineer Experience, along with three other employees from the company, bringing Saturday Drive’s total crew number to 25. Chirinos began working as a product manager atLiquid Webearlier this year.”Sarah GoodingAutomattic Buys TumblrBridget thinks Automattic is buying users so they can sell out. She is hoping after the sale of Automattic, Matt Mullenweg will focus on the WordPress Project. This eliminates the c. Maybe Automattic needed t

62 MINSEP 3
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The State of the WordPress Ecosystem: Summer Update

Influencer Marketing: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

In this episode, Bridget and Jason riff on marketing with influencers, affiliate links, and guest bloggers.Thank you to our sponsors!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.comas well asVendorFuel.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Inspiration for This Week’s EpisodeJason totally loves Buffer’s “Science of Social Media” podcast. Herecommends this episodein particular.“You can’t talk about social media without talking about social science.” Bridget WillardWhat is an influencer?There is always someone that everyone looks to whether it’s in a WordPress Meetup or the gorillas in the mountains. Every social group has an influencer. Dynamics change as the groups change and that’s why your marketing budget can be spent more effectively with micro-influencers.Micro-influencers, quotes Jason from Buffer’s episode, those with smaller numbers, have a 8.8% engagement rate. They have quality followers and they have the time to engage. This is the reason why so many WordPress agencies use affiliate marketing.“Influencer marketing is just referral marketing.” Bridget WillardMake Your Own InfluencersThe best way to engage in influencer marketing is to make your own influencers. We all have a sphere of influence of about twelve people. You have super fans who are always sharing your product.Reward and dopamine are totally connected. After you’ve continually trained them by recognizing or rewarding them, they will engage in this behavior more often. The dopamine rush can come before the reward.“Reward and recognize those people who are taking the time to talk about your brand. Those are your influencers.” Bridget WillardInfluencer Marketing in WordPressYour influencers should resonate with your brand and vice versa. The best practice should be to find someone in your target market. Protect your brand. Ensure that person resonates with your core values, in their whole life, not just online.This applies to sponsoring blog posts, speakers at WordCamps, or even volunteers for Make WordPress.“Make sure they are good stewards of your product.” Jason TuckerUse micro-influencers with your content marketing. Instead of paying $2000 for one blog post, pay 20 people $100. You get 20 articles instead of one and that’s almost one every week for six months. Hire your super fans to write guest blog posts on your site. They get the byline, $100, and are happy. You get content to help your SEO efforts. It’s a win-win-win.How do you find your influencers?Find them with how they communicate with you. Are they tweeting about your brand a lot? They may come up to your booth at a WordCamp or talk to you after you speak.Ask them about how they use your product. Allow the conversation to be naturally unfold. Then ask if they would like to participate.“That’s the best person to talk about that subject matter anyhow.” Jason TuckerWhat shouldn’t you do?Avoid Cognitive Dissonance.You shouldn’t go outside of your market domain. Bridget shouldn’t be an influencer for solar panels or HVAC companies, for example. She’s influential in other areas, but not in construction. Chris Lema is a cigar influencer, but not in cannabis.You shouldn’t go after people who just have big numbers. A lot of their followers could be bought. Are their followers your potential customers?Make sure there is no conflict of interest. You don’t want the influencer to degrade your brand.You shouldn’t pay for ghost written reviews. That is disingenuous at best and unethical not to mention against FTC rules.Isn’t it common knowledge that bloggers are paid to tout products or that if you click a link on a blogger’s site to buy a product, the blogger will get a commission?No. Some bloggers who mention products in their posts have no connection to t

61 MINAUG 14
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Influencer Marketing: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

WordPress Marketing: Standing out from the Services Crowd w/ Jason Resnick

This week Jason and Bridget are joined by popular podcast hostJason ResnickfromLive in the Feast. Jason builthis business in WordPress servicesand he has been talking a ton right now about word-of-mouth marketing by standing out in the crowd including niching down in the client space you serve.Thank you to our sponsors!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.comas well asVendorFuel.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40-minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.No matter what you do, it has to feel natural to you. This is the main point of this episode. Here are some good ideas but it’s not a rule.How do you not stand out?Definitely don’t be negative. Avoid client shaming online.“They’re paying you to have the expertise and knowledge.” Jason ResnickDon’t go dark after your client accepts your contract and pays them.“Reach out and say ‘hey I’m excited to be working with you, here’s what you can expect over the next few days.” Jason ResnickDon’t be inauthentic or be rude under the guise of authenticity. Don’t try to copy what works for Gary Vaynerchuck, Chris Lema, Ellen DeGeneres, Simon Sinek. Be you. Their methods work for them because it’s their truth.Stand Out by Providing an ExperienceUsing empathy for your customer, not relying upon jargon, makes you a good “technical liason” as Jason Resnick (Rezzz) says. That skillset allowed him to stand out and provide a good experience for them.“Create Memorable Moments.” Jason ResnickRezzz recommends Jay Baer’s bookTalk Triggers. He also talks aboutLaura Elizabethwho helps gather content from her clients by giving them gift cards to a local cafe. It’s onSeason 1 Episode 7of Live in the Feast if you want to listen. These micro moments and celebrations smooth out bumpy spots in the project journey that are inevitable.Stand Out by Being HumanRezzz says we should be human with our clients. Showing your clients that you pay attention to their interests (like buying them tickets for a minor league baseball game with their son who loves baseball).Stand Out by Being HelpfulAnswer questions on Twitter, LinkedIn, or wherever. There is an attitude that people should just search for their answers on Google. But the uneducated will get so many choices. You’ll get too much information.Stand Out with Your Online PresenceYour website should look good and represent you well, so that when people talk about you that word-of-mouth referral doesn’t die at your URL.Rezzz’ Services Pageis an excellent example of clear pricing and communication to the client.Stand Out by Hosting a PodcastRezzz has six seasons ofLive in the Feast. He decided to create seasons about a business topic. It takes a bit more planning to create the season’s story arch. The seasons create binge-able and helpful content. Since Rezzz isn’t a long-form writer, much like our friendCarl Alexander, he decided a podcast was the right solution.Tool or Tip of the WeekThis Tool or Tip of the week is brought to you by VendorFuel. VendorFuel is a next-generation shopping cart plugin that will ignite your eCommerce. Built using AngularJS VendorFuel lets you keep your customers on your website for the entire checkout experience. Start a 90-day free trial now and Ignite Your eCommerce atVendorFuel.com!Bridget likesTiny Habits— the book by Jonathan Wold.Jason Resnick (Rezzz) likesBonjoro— you can send personalized videos to your clients and friends.Jason is in onShortcuts App(which will be part of iOS13) and theReddit Subthread.Do you have any tools or tips we should know about?We’d love to hear from you. What are your experiences with this subject?Tell us in the comments below.

59 MINAUG 14
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WordPress Marketing: Standing out from the Services Crowd w/ Jason Resnick

Separating Your Identity from Your Product w/ Cory Miller

EIn this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined byCory Millerfor a discussion on creation versus identity.As product creators, how do you separate your identity from your product? Why does it matter? When you sell your product, who are you? With all of the acquisitions that are happening now, this is an important factor in the WordPress ecosystem both financially and mentallyThank you to our sponsor!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.comas well asPeepSo.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40 minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Product Acquisitions in WordPressPantheon recently bought Staging Pilot. Of course we know aboutLiquid Web buying iThemesandGenesis being bought by WPEngine. So, how does this affect product creators?The hardest thing, though, was leaving the team, not the product. He’ll always be attached to the brand, but it’s really about the people.“Some of my best friends in life were on [the iThemes] team.” Cory MillerIf it works for you, go for venture capital. But have some balance with your sweat and actual equity. It’s a big deal to be responsible for someone else’s paycheck.“Always use somebody else’s money.”Cory MillerHow do you separate yourself from your creation?Bridget set up the context of this discussion with a quote from the Game of Thrones co-writer.“…I was very attached to the words I wrote, because I wrote them. It’s like a part of me. If I don’t like these, I don’t like me.”D.B. Weiss,Creative Brain on NetflixCory Miller says his startup was like a baby and for the first few years there were a lot of diaper changes. He brought it through infancy to kindergarten. He recognizes that it’s been a while since he felt those original growing pains.“Up until now, I never saw myself as a creator… but Gosh the parallels are compelling.” Cory Miller“When you build something whether it’s with your hands or your blood, sweat equity, …you do feel so woven into that.”Cory MillerBuild the life and the work you want.The main question you, as a creator, need to ask yourself is this: how painful is it to do everything yourself? Or — how much joy do you have working alone. You can work alone. Build that life. But if you want to build a company, then you have to delegate and/or outsource.We should not feel guilty for outsourcing tasks to others whether it’s housekeeping, development, marketing, or support.How do you stop being a Micromanaging Creator?Cory talks about Assembly Line leadership to get productivity. Throwing more people at problem isn’t more effective. If you care about people, they’ll care about you.“When it comes to leadership, it’s one simple skill: care.” Cory MillerIn the creator mindset, it’s very hard to delegate, Cory says, because they are craftspeople at heart. And that is a tough situation when it comes to delegation.Jason reminds us that having a branding guide is a good way to communicate the persona to others the way thatJen Millerand I do for our blogging and social media clients. They’re trusting us to represent them. The brand should always come first in a company — even over its creator. This allows people to be cross-trained, even in small companies, so the employees can go on vacation.It needs to be psychologically safe in your organization for team members to make decisions with the values in mind. You need to be okay with that.(ReadChapter 3 on Teams from this book. It’s worth it.)“Do they feel safe to make a decision?” Cory MillerLeaving a Team to A New DuckHow do you feel about handing over a team to a new duck to imprint upon? For Cory, he trusted Matt entirely. He knew his team would play their own songs. He is so proud that they can operate without him.Be a leader through crisis and change.Some people may choose to not continue.Communicate the positives of

54 MINJUL 10
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Separating Your Identity from Your Product w/ Cory Miller

Marketing Managed WordPress Hosting in a Saturated Market

In this episode, Jason Tucker and Bridget Willard were joined by Jeff Matson from Pagely's NorthStack. He gave insight into Managed WordPress, WordPress Hosting, and Managed AWS Service.Thank you to our sponsor!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored by ServerPress makers of DesktopServer. Be sure to check them out at https://www.serverpress.com as well as PeepSo.If you're interested in sponsoring the 40 minute mark of this show, check out the details on our sponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Stop Getting Cheep-A$$ HostingWordPress hosting matters. Hosting is hosting is hosting until it's not. When it comes to your "hobby," if you take it seriously, it has the potential to become your career.It seems like WordPress hosting is saturated, but it's really not. Pagely was the first to create Wordpress Managed hosting back in the day. You can hear Joshua Strebel talk about the last ten years in his WordCamp Phoenix talk.So, how do we convince content creators, bloggers, and non-inside baseball writers to think good hosting is important?When you pay for $5 hosting, you get $5 hosting. They're digital slumlords, Bridget says in jest. If the support folks are getting paid minimum wage ($7 something in VA), the Five Dollar Host loses money every time one of their customers calls."Even if they are getting paid minimum wage, if they talk to you for an hour, the company lost money on you." Jeff MatsonBridget spends $25 a month on Pressable and thinks that's a reasonable amount for anyone to spend. To her, it matters that the company she chooses has a reputation of treating their employees well."I don't want to use a service that has a big turnover. If they can't keep their employees, they have internal issues." Bridget WillardHobbyists Learn Everything When Their Sites Blow UpIt's true. When your blog gets notices, as Jason points out, and all of a sudden you're getting traffic, your site may not be able to handle that. Managed hosts will scale the traffic.Do you want to learn the hard way? Your hobby or small business needs to value website hosting."You teach them that their business is important." Jeff MatsonYou don't need more web hosting than your site requires, especially if you're getting only 20 hits a week. But with something like a managed service, you can scale up and then down when you need it.What do you get with Managed WordPress Hosting?If you're in the $250 a month or $25 a month plan, when you pay for managed WordPress hosting, you're paying for support. Larger fees at the front pay for concierge-level service. Jeff recalls how Pagely had top-tier folks in their slack helping with Gravity Forms site migrations at midnight. That's the kind of service you get with top-tier Managed WordPress Hosting.Why not run your own box?You could run your own DigitalOcean box, but why? If you're running your own box, you have to do all of the security maintenance, patches, and updates. Also, if you're facing a DDOS attack, you have to face those trials, too.Almost any level of business should outsource these types of things so they can focus on working on your business."Is that really what you want to spend your billable hours on?" Bridget WillardSo, the perfect solution between running your own box and buying high-end Managed WordPress hosting is managed AWS service.What is a Managed AWS Service?With NorthStack, Pagely is bringing the same level of product without the support. You can get a fast site that scales when someone posts your article to Reddit."It's an unbelievable product to host your sites on without all the extra stuff that you might not need." Jeff MatsonThis is made for developers who use GitHub and CLI to create apps and build sites. For now, that's where NorthStack is focusing. You pay for the amount of resources you're using instead of a general bucket. Automated deployments for the win.This product better suited for small to enterprise agenc

51 MINJUN 12
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Marketing Managed WordPress Hosting in a Saturated Market

Marketing Yourself as a WordPress Developer

Marketing yourself as a WordPress developer is challenging, especially when starting out. In this episode, Jason and Bridget are joined byRachelle Wise of Wise Artsto brainstorm some solutions.Join us on this episode of WPblab by visiting ourParticipant guidelinespage.Thank you to our sponsor!The WPwatercooler network is sponsored byServerPressmakers ofDesktopServer. Be sure to check them out athttps://www.serverpress.com.If you’re interested in sponsoring the 40 minute mark of this show, check out the details on oursponsor page. We offer episode by episode spoken ads, rather than large contracts. A show by you for you.Networking through WordPress MeetupsRachelle used to be part of her local WordPress Meetups and WordCamps when she lived in Minnesota. So when she moved here to California, she looked it up and lo and behold she found theOC WordPress Meetup, where she met Bridget and Jason.Often, attending WordPress Meetups is an excellent way to get work, said Jason, who was reminded about the way Steve runs the general meetup where a lot of new users show up. Steve would suggest that those who need help meet a developer. Mostly, they would want to hire.Rachelle didn’t get work that way directly but still sees the value of Meetups, especially since one works alone.“I’ve definitely given a lot of free advice; not any paid stuff yet.” Rachelle WiseWordCamps and Meetups are brand awareness campaigns in the sense that you are meeting people and reminding them that you are in business or still in business. Keeping top of mind is important with any business.Think about speaking. Even Jason Tucker tells attendees of Whittier WordPress Meetup to build something then teach people how you did it, what you learned, and what you would do better next time.MarketingWise ArtsSo FarRachelle has done quite a bit of instinctual marketing so far. She hasn’t done any paid ads yet. She started working at an agency then worked as a sole developer for an agency. Once she became a remote worker, she was never going back.After the sole developer gig devolved, she reached out to former contacts at the agency and she got several contracts through that.“Eighty to ninety percent of my work is referral based. I meet someone I do a project for them, they tell their friends… I end up getting these amazing chains of referrals.” Rachelle WiseThe Magic Word is ReferralsMost businesses works on referrals and that’s why brand awareness is so important, Bridget reminds Jason and Rachelle. Being on shows, having Twitter and social media accounts matter. If referrals are your biggest source (your audience) then going to WordPress Meetups matters most.“Referral marekting is marketing.” Bridget WillardDon’t burn bridges. Keep lines of communication open. If you decline work, refer instead.The thing about referral work is people often build a thing, put up a landing page and that’s it. At some point, you’re going to exhaust your first circle. You do that through marketing whether it’s social marketing or paid marketing orin-person events like Ross Gile does with Chamber of Commerces.How should a beginner developer market himself?“You have to build something. Please build something.” Jason TuckerSet up aGitHub account.Set upCodePen account.Go throughFreeCodeCamp.org. It makes you build projects that can be used on your portfolio.Spend time on LinkedIn and keep it updated.Call yourself a website builder.Do pro-bono work to build your portfolio.Case studies with screenshots are better than just links.Videos to show specific functionality is great.Build your own website and maintain it.Pick at niche then go to a trade show. Build landing pages for that niche.Have business cards to hand out.Go to WordCamps and WordPress Meetups.Go to Javascript or WooCommerce Meetups.“Build your site on WordPress.com; it’s better than WIX.” Bridget WillardHow do you get free work?“Find someone that looks like they need help.” Rachelle WiseTry approaching local pizza places or nonpr

60 MINMAY 27
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Marketing Yourself as a WordPress Developer