title

Cookery by the Book

Suzy Chase

5
Followers
79
Plays
Cookery by the Book
Cookery by the Book

Cookery by the Book

Suzy Chase

5
Followers
79
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

Cookery by the Book is a podcast for cookbook lovers. Join host, Suzy Chase, as she chats with cookbook authors to discover interesting stories behind your favorite cookbooks. In every episode Suzy makes a recipe out of the cookbook for discussion. Happy listening & cooking!

Latest Episodes

Pesto By Leslie Lennox

Pesto: The Modern Mother SauceBy Leslie Lennox Intro: Welcome to the Cookery by the Book podcast with Suzy Chase. She's just a home cook in New York City, sitting at her dining room table talking to cookbook authors.Leslie Lennox: Hi, I'm Leslie Lennox and my new cookbook is Pesto: The Modern Mother Sauce.Suzy Chase: Hope's Gardens is the award winning pesto company you founded. It all started when you and your husband Dave bought the home of your dreams in Atlanta and lo and behold, there was an iconic 1200 square foot, 1937 Lord and Burnham greenhouse on the property. What happened next?Leslie Lennox: We started working on several projects all at once. We were restoring the house. We were contemplating how we would approach the greenhouse and envisioning what we wanted in the backyard and garden. Although this was very exciting, the property, which was a little less than five acres, was very overwhelming for a city girl and a guy who had never gardened in his life. It was a little like Green Acres. So Dave has always approached things logically and I do so impulsively. So together we're a little bit of Ying and Yang. We agreed that we would live on the property for a year to understand what it actually needed and watch how the weather affected it. We also took a year or so to basically tame this property. The previous owners had grown old in the house and they were no longer able to take care of the home, the greenhouse, the gardens. So we set out to remove many of the large trees that looked like they would fall and do a great deal of damage to both our home and the greenhouse. The greenhouse had been painted blue. It had been turned into a storage shed. The roof was covered over with plywood and it was quite daunting. At the same time we had a young child at home and we were trying to take care of her and take care of this massive project.Suzy Chase: Talk about how you built your grassroots following the old-fashioned way.Leslie Lennox: Well, Suzy, yes, we definitely built Hope's Gardens the old-fashioned way. Our small family business came about organically. Dave and I had always enjoyed eating, cooking, and entertaining. So pesto was just a normal by-product of our daily lives. Dave gardened in his spare time and I cooked all the time. We were sharing our food with friends and they were encouraging us to sell our pesto. So I was immediately interested in doing that. Dave was not so much. At the same time I was working from home. I was making handmade greeting cards, while taking care of Hope. A friend of ours was organizing a new farmers market that was set to open in the spring of 2007 in our neighborhood. She was in charge of rounding out the mix of vendors and thought that my cards would fit in. I immediately said yes and Dave, Hope, and I set up a booth and started to sell cards. In addition to us, there was an egg vendor, a fresh pasta maker, one or two farmers from Alabama and north Georgia, and a jam maker. At the same time, less than three miles from this market in our garden, we had seven large beds overflowing with every kind of produce you could imagine. We had varieties of tomatoes. We had basil, cucumbers, many varieties of lettuce, eggplants, peppers, and you probably get the idea from that. I proposed to Dave, why don't we bring bags of our lettuce and herbs to the next market? He kind of thought that was a stupid idea, but the following week he agreed to go out and harvest the lettuce and herbs before we left early for the market. Within an hour or so, everything was sold. So this was no longer a dumb idea. And we did this for a few more weeks and then the light bulb moment came to try our pesto, and it was really exciting to see the reactions of people coming through the market. They knew next to nothing about us, but they loved our product, which was made from our homegrown Genovese basil. So we built on this week by week. Talking with customers to educate them on how we were growing our basil

-1 s11 hours ago
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Pesto By Leslie Lennox

We Are La Cocina By Leticia Landa & Caleb Zigas

We Are La CocinaBy Leticia Landa & Caleb Zigas Intro: Welcome to the Cookery by the Book podcast with Suzy Chase. She's just a home cook in New York City sitting at her dining room table talking to cookbook authors. Leticia Landa: I'm Leticia Landa and I am the co-author of We are La Cocina, Recipe for an American Dream.Suzy Chase: La Cocina began as a tiny grassroots organization in a city, San Francisco, with one of the most competitive food industries in the nation. You're the deputy director and you joined as the third staff member in 2008. How did you learn about the organization and why did you come on board?Leticia Landa: That's such a great question. It was so long ago. I actually read about La Cocina in the New York Times. They had had just an article written about the organization that featured Veronica Salazar who's the owner of El Huarache Loco. She's also the first person in the cookbook because she was the first person who joined the program. I just thought it sounded ...

-1 s1 weeks ago
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We Are La Cocina By Leticia Landa & Caleb Zigas

The Recipe By Josh Emett

The RecipeBy Josh Emett Intro: Welcome to the Cookery by the Book podcast with Suzy Chase. She's just a home cook in New York City, sitting at her dining room table, talking the cookbook authors.Josh Emett: Hi, I'm Josh Emett, and my book is called The Recipe. It has 150 of the world's finest chefs contributing, with 300 of the world's best recipes.Suzy Chase: You call the recipes in this cookbook the world's great classic dishes. How do you define classic when it comes to these recipes?Josh Emett: Well, that's an interesting thing, because when you go down to it, and you dial in about what is a classic recipe, we sort of came back to, the point is, and this is an obscure way of describing it, but it has to be a thing. You know, if it's a thing and it's been a thing for a long, long time, and what a thing means is that it means something to you, or that it's become a classic, it's got an identity in its own right. And so many of these dishes have, they have been replicated, and emul...

-1 s2 weeks ago
Comments
The Recipe By Josh Emett

Latest Episodes

Pesto By Leslie Lennox

Pesto: The Modern Mother SauceBy Leslie Lennox Intro: Welcome to the Cookery by the Book podcast with Suzy Chase. She's just a home cook in New York City, sitting at her dining room table talking to cookbook authors.Leslie Lennox: Hi, I'm Leslie Lennox and my new cookbook is Pesto: The Modern Mother Sauce.Suzy Chase: Hope's Gardens is the award winning pesto company you founded. It all started when you and your husband Dave bought the home of your dreams in Atlanta and lo and behold, there was an iconic 1200 square foot, 1937 Lord and Burnham greenhouse on the property. What happened next?Leslie Lennox: We started working on several projects all at once. We were restoring the house. We were contemplating how we would approach the greenhouse and envisioning what we wanted in the backyard and garden. Although this was very exciting, the property, which was a little less than five acres, was very overwhelming for a city girl and a guy who had never gardened in his life. It was a little like Green Acres. So Dave has always approached things logically and I do so impulsively. So together we're a little bit of Ying and Yang. We agreed that we would live on the property for a year to understand what it actually needed and watch how the weather affected it. We also took a year or so to basically tame this property. The previous owners had grown old in the house and they were no longer able to take care of the home, the greenhouse, the gardens. So we set out to remove many of the large trees that looked like they would fall and do a great deal of damage to both our home and the greenhouse. The greenhouse had been painted blue. It had been turned into a storage shed. The roof was covered over with plywood and it was quite daunting. At the same time we had a young child at home and we were trying to take care of her and take care of this massive project.Suzy Chase: Talk about how you built your grassroots following the old-fashioned way.Leslie Lennox: Well, Suzy, yes, we definitely built Hope's Gardens the old-fashioned way. Our small family business came about organically. Dave and I had always enjoyed eating, cooking, and entertaining. So pesto was just a normal by-product of our daily lives. Dave gardened in his spare time and I cooked all the time. We were sharing our food with friends and they were encouraging us to sell our pesto. So I was immediately interested in doing that. Dave was not so much. At the same time I was working from home. I was making handmade greeting cards, while taking care of Hope. A friend of ours was organizing a new farmers market that was set to open in the spring of 2007 in our neighborhood. She was in charge of rounding out the mix of vendors and thought that my cards would fit in. I immediately said yes and Dave, Hope, and I set up a booth and started to sell cards. In addition to us, there was an egg vendor, a fresh pasta maker, one or two farmers from Alabama and north Georgia, and a jam maker. At the same time, less than three miles from this market in our garden, we had seven large beds overflowing with every kind of produce you could imagine. We had varieties of tomatoes. We had basil, cucumbers, many varieties of lettuce, eggplants, peppers, and you probably get the idea from that. I proposed to Dave, why don't we bring bags of our lettuce and herbs to the next market? He kind of thought that was a stupid idea, but the following week he agreed to go out and harvest the lettuce and herbs before we left early for the market. Within an hour or so, everything was sold. So this was no longer a dumb idea. And we did this for a few more weeks and then the light bulb moment came to try our pesto, and it was really exciting to see the reactions of people coming through the market. They knew next to nothing about us, but they loved our product, which was made from our homegrown Genovese basil. So we built on this week by week. Talking with customers to educate them on how we were growing our basil

-1 s11 hours ago
Comments
Pesto By Leslie Lennox

We Are La Cocina By Leticia Landa & Caleb Zigas

We Are La CocinaBy Leticia Landa & Caleb Zigas Intro: Welcome to the Cookery by the Book podcast with Suzy Chase. She's just a home cook in New York City sitting at her dining room table talking to cookbook authors. Leticia Landa: I'm Leticia Landa and I am the co-author of We are La Cocina, Recipe for an American Dream.Suzy Chase: La Cocina began as a tiny grassroots organization in a city, San Francisco, with one of the most competitive food industries in the nation. You're the deputy director and you joined as the third staff member in 2008. How did you learn about the organization and why did you come on board?Leticia Landa: That's such a great question. It was so long ago. I actually read about La Cocina in the New York Times. They had had just an article written about the organization that featured Veronica Salazar who's the owner of El Huarache Loco. She's also the first person in the cookbook because she was the first person who joined the program. I just thought it sounded ...

-1 s1 weeks ago
Comments
We Are La Cocina By Leticia Landa & Caleb Zigas

The Recipe By Josh Emett

The RecipeBy Josh Emett Intro: Welcome to the Cookery by the Book podcast with Suzy Chase. She's just a home cook in New York City, sitting at her dining room table, talking the cookbook authors.Josh Emett: Hi, I'm Josh Emett, and my book is called The Recipe. It has 150 of the world's finest chefs contributing, with 300 of the world's best recipes.Suzy Chase: You call the recipes in this cookbook the world's great classic dishes. How do you define classic when it comes to these recipes?Josh Emett: Well, that's an interesting thing, because when you go down to it, and you dial in about what is a classic recipe, we sort of came back to, the point is, and this is an obscure way of describing it, but it has to be a thing. You know, if it's a thing and it's been a thing for a long, long time, and what a thing means is that it means something to you, or that it's become a classic, it's got an identity in its own right. And so many of these dishes have, they have been replicated, and emul...

-1 s2 weeks ago
Comments
The Recipe By Josh Emett

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