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Dermatology Weekly

3
Followers
103
Plays
0
Raised
Dermatology Weekly

Dermatology Weekly

MDEdge

3
Followers
103
Plays
0
Raised
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About Us

Stay current on medical, surgical, and aesthetic dermatology developments with Dermatology Weekly, a podcast featuring news relevant to the practice of dermatology, and peer-to-peer interviews with Doctor Vincent A. DeLeo, who interviews physician authors from Cutis on topics such as psoriasis, skin cancer, atopic dermatitis, hair and nail disorders, cosmetic procedures, environmental dermatology, contact dermatitis, pigmentation disorders, acne, rosacea, alopecia, practice management, and more. Plus, resident discussions geared toward physicians in-training. Subscribe now. The information in this podcast is provided for informational and educational purposes only.

Latest Episodes

Nail education, plus oral treatment of hyperhidrosis, and gentamicin for epidermolysis bullosa

In this episode, Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks to Dr. Shari Lipner about nail education gaps in the American Academy of Dermatology Basic Dermatology Curriculum. Although the curriculum is designed to introduce medical students to essential concepts in dermatology, nail-related topics such as diagnostic techniques, biopsy procedures, and skin cancers of the nail unit are inadequately covered. Dr. Lipner discusses strategies to close these gaps and improve nail education for medical students and dermatology residents. She also breaks down the mnemonic for identifying nail melanomas. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research: 1. Gentamicin restores wound healing in hereditary epidermolysis bullosa. 2. Measles complications in the U.S. unchanged in posteradication era. 3. Dr. Adam Friedman outlines oral treatment options for hyperhidrosis. Things you will learn in this episode: A thorough full-body skin examination should include the skin, hair, and scalp, as well as the nails. Even while the patient is initially speaking, pay attention to the nails. Many dermatology residents and attendings are not familiar with the ABCDEF nail melanoma mnemonic, which is more complex than the mnemonic for cutaneous melanoma. There is a gap in educating dermatology residents on nail biopsies and surgical procedures. Nail education can be improved by encouraging medical students and residents to be aware of the nails, get comfortable with the nails, and incorporate nails into the didactics during medical school and training. More lectures at national and local conferences and hands-on learning also are helpful. “By understanding nails, both diagnosis and management, potentially we can improve patients' quality of life, and it can also be lifesaving in the case of malignancies.” Hosts: Elizabeth Mechcatie; Terry Rudd; Vincent A. DeLeo, MD (Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles) Guest: Shari R. Lipner, MD, PhD (Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York) Show notes by Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears, and Elizabeth Mechcatie. Contact us: podcasts@mdedge.com Twitter: @MDedgeDerm Rate us on iTunes!

29 MIN6 days ago
Comments
Nail education, plus oral treatment of hyperhidrosis, and gentamicin for epidermolysis bullosa

Pediatric wart management, plus sunscreens in the blood and spironolactone for acne

In this episode, Vincent DeLeo, MD, talks to Nanette B. Silverberg, MD, about the successful management of warts in the pediatric population. Warts are superficial viral infections of the skin that are extremely common in children and account for a large proportion of pediatric dermatology office visits. Although over-the-counter treatments for warts are widely available to patients, they are not universally effective. Dr. Silverberg outlines a detailed treatment paradigm for managing pediatric warts and reviews a variety of new and established treatment options in six therapeutic categories. She also reviews the latest human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine recommendations for children. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research: 1. Sunscreen ingredients found in bloodstream, but health impact unknown. 2. Females with acne stay on spironolactone longer than antibiotics in real-world usage study. 3. Employed physicians now outnumber independent doctors. Things you will learn in this episode: Warts are benign epidermal lesions caused by infection with HPV, which replicates in skin cells to induce a state of hyperkeratosis. There are more than 200 types of HPV, and warts have variable clinical and histologic features depending on type and location. The incidence of pediatric warts appears to peak in preadolescence. Children with atopic dermatitis may be at higher risk for developing warts and other extracutaneous infections. Warts in the setting of AD may indicate that a child is prone to other dermatologic or allergic conditions. Most warts in children are transmitted in close household, classroom, or sports settings. Evaluation for signs of sexual abuse always is warranted in children presenting with condyloma. Dermatologists should be aware of respiratory complications associated with HPV infection in children. The majority of warts likely will spontaneously resolve, but those that spread or do not resolve following observation or traditional therapies may require alternative treatment mechanisms. Treatment options for pediatric warts generally fall into six therapeutic categories: destructive, immune stimulating, immune modulating, irritant therapy, vascular destructive, and nitric oxide releasing. The therapeutic ladder for warts in children consists of seven rungs, beginning with diagnosis. If the clinical presentation is not clear, suspected warts should be biopsied prior to treatment to avoid unnecessary procedures or exacerbation of the condition. Avoid painful procedures in children. The most recent HPV vaccine offers broad protection and should be offered to both girls and boys before they become sexually active. The dosing schedule should be reviewed with the pediatrician. Cohosts: Elizabeth Mechcatie; Terry Rudd; Vincent A. DeLeo, MD (Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles) Guest: Nanette B. Silverberg, MD (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York) Show notes by Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears, and Elizabeth Mechcatie. Contact us: podcasts@mdedge.com Twitter: @MDedgeDerm Rate us on iTunes!

30 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Pediatric wart management, plus sunscreens in the blood and spironolactone for acne

Are parabens safe? Plus, methotrexate for psoriatic arthritis, and tips for resurfacing skin of color

In this episode, Dr. Vincent DeLeo discusses consumer misconceptions about parabens with Dr. Margo Reeder and Dr. Amber Atwater. Although consumers believe parabens are associated with health risks such as breast cancer and endocrine disruption, the data have not been conclusive regarding any harmful effects in humans. Dr. Reeder and Dr. Atwater explain the use of parabens as preservatives in cosmetic products, and they discuss the American Contact Dermatitis Society’s selection of parabens as the 2019 nonallergen of the year. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research: 1. Surprise! Methotrexate proves effective in psoriatic arthritis. 2. Positive psoriatic arthritis screens occur often in psoriasis patients. 3. Tips for preventing complications in resurfacing skin of color. Things you will learn in this episode: Parabens are present in a number of cosmetic and household products and medications, but the maximum concentrations permitted generally are much lower than consumers may think. Consumers associate parabens with health risks such as breast cancer and endocrine disruption, but the actual data on estrogenic effects in humans are limited. Although parabens have been found in breast cancer tissue, findings have not been directly linked to use of topical axillary personal care products containing parabens, such as deodorants. Application of these products directly after shaving also has not been shown to increase breast cancer risk. Because of their low rate of associated allergic contact dermatitis, the American Contact Dermatitis Society named parabens the nonallergen of the year for 2019. Parabens are a safe choice for preservatives given their low allergenic potential. Dermatologists can ease patient concerns about parabens by explaining that a causative role in adverse health effects has not been proven. Guests: Margo Reeder, MD (University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison); Amber Reck Atwater, MD (Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, N.C.) Show notes by Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears, and Elizabeth Mechcatie. Contact us: podcasts@mdedge.com Twitter: @MDedgeDerm

15 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Are parabens safe? Plus, methotrexate for psoriatic arthritis, and tips for resurfacing skin of color

Latest Episodes

Nail education, plus oral treatment of hyperhidrosis, and gentamicin for epidermolysis bullosa

In this episode, Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks to Dr. Shari Lipner about nail education gaps in the American Academy of Dermatology Basic Dermatology Curriculum. Although the curriculum is designed to introduce medical students to essential concepts in dermatology, nail-related topics such as diagnostic techniques, biopsy procedures, and skin cancers of the nail unit are inadequately covered. Dr. Lipner discusses strategies to close these gaps and improve nail education for medical students and dermatology residents. She also breaks down the mnemonic for identifying nail melanomas. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research: 1. Gentamicin restores wound healing in hereditary epidermolysis bullosa. 2. Measles complications in the U.S. unchanged in posteradication era. 3. Dr. Adam Friedman outlines oral treatment options for hyperhidrosis. Things you will learn in this episode: A thorough full-body skin examination should include the skin, hair, and scalp, as well as the nails. Even while the patient is initially speaking, pay attention to the nails. Many dermatology residents and attendings are not familiar with the ABCDEF nail melanoma mnemonic, which is more complex than the mnemonic for cutaneous melanoma. There is a gap in educating dermatology residents on nail biopsies and surgical procedures. Nail education can be improved by encouraging medical students and residents to be aware of the nails, get comfortable with the nails, and incorporate nails into the didactics during medical school and training. More lectures at national and local conferences and hands-on learning also are helpful. “By understanding nails, both diagnosis and management, potentially we can improve patients' quality of life, and it can also be lifesaving in the case of malignancies.” Hosts: Elizabeth Mechcatie; Terry Rudd; Vincent A. DeLeo, MD (Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles) Guest: Shari R. Lipner, MD, PhD (Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York) Show notes by Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears, and Elizabeth Mechcatie. Contact us: podcasts@mdedge.com Twitter: @MDedgeDerm Rate us on iTunes!

29 MIN6 days ago
Comments
Nail education, plus oral treatment of hyperhidrosis, and gentamicin for epidermolysis bullosa

Pediatric wart management, plus sunscreens in the blood and spironolactone for acne

In this episode, Vincent DeLeo, MD, talks to Nanette B. Silverberg, MD, about the successful management of warts in the pediatric population. Warts are superficial viral infections of the skin that are extremely common in children and account for a large proportion of pediatric dermatology office visits. Although over-the-counter treatments for warts are widely available to patients, they are not universally effective. Dr. Silverberg outlines a detailed treatment paradigm for managing pediatric warts and reviews a variety of new and established treatment options in six therapeutic categories. She also reviews the latest human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine recommendations for children. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research: 1. Sunscreen ingredients found in bloodstream, but health impact unknown. 2. Females with acne stay on spironolactone longer than antibiotics in real-world usage study. 3. Employed physicians now outnumber independent doctors. Things you will learn in this episode: Warts are benign epidermal lesions caused by infection with HPV, which replicates in skin cells to induce a state of hyperkeratosis. There are more than 200 types of HPV, and warts have variable clinical and histologic features depending on type and location. The incidence of pediatric warts appears to peak in preadolescence. Children with atopic dermatitis may be at higher risk for developing warts and other extracutaneous infections. Warts in the setting of AD may indicate that a child is prone to other dermatologic or allergic conditions. Most warts in children are transmitted in close household, classroom, or sports settings. Evaluation for signs of sexual abuse always is warranted in children presenting with condyloma. Dermatologists should be aware of respiratory complications associated with HPV infection in children. The majority of warts likely will spontaneously resolve, but those that spread or do not resolve following observation or traditional therapies may require alternative treatment mechanisms. Treatment options for pediatric warts generally fall into six therapeutic categories: destructive, immune stimulating, immune modulating, irritant therapy, vascular destructive, and nitric oxide releasing. The therapeutic ladder for warts in children consists of seven rungs, beginning with diagnosis. If the clinical presentation is not clear, suspected warts should be biopsied prior to treatment to avoid unnecessary procedures or exacerbation of the condition. Avoid painful procedures in children. The most recent HPV vaccine offers broad protection and should be offered to both girls and boys before they become sexually active. The dosing schedule should be reviewed with the pediatrician. Cohosts: Elizabeth Mechcatie; Terry Rudd; Vincent A. DeLeo, MD (Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles) Guest: Nanette B. Silverberg, MD (Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York) Show notes by Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears, and Elizabeth Mechcatie. Contact us: podcasts@mdedge.com Twitter: @MDedgeDerm Rate us on iTunes!

30 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Pediatric wart management, plus sunscreens in the blood and spironolactone for acne

Are parabens safe? Plus, methotrexate for psoriatic arthritis, and tips for resurfacing skin of color

In this episode, Dr. Vincent DeLeo discusses consumer misconceptions about parabens with Dr. Margo Reeder and Dr. Amber Atwater. Although consumers believe parabens are associated with health risks such as breast cancer and endocrine disruption, the data have not been conclusive regarding any harmful effects in humans. Dr. Reeder and Dr. Atwater explain the use of parabens as preservatives in cosmetic products, and they discuss the American Contact Dermatitis Society’s selection of parabens as the 2019 nonallergen of the year. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research: 1. Surprise! Methotrexate proves effective in psoriatic arthritis. 2. Positive psoriatic arthritis screens occur often in psoriasis patients. 3. Tips for preventing complications in resurfacing skin of color. Things you will learn in this episode: Parabens are present in a number of cosmetic and household products and medications, but the maximum concentrations permitted generally are much lower than consumers may think. Consumers associate parabens with health risks such as breast cancer and endocrine disruption, but the actual data on estrogenic effects in humans are limited. Although parabens have been found in breast cancer tissue, findings have not been directly linked to use of topical axillary personal care products containing parabens, such as deodorants. Application of these products directly after shaving also has not been shown to increase breast cancer risk. Because of their low rate of associated allergic contact dermatitis, the American Contact Dermatitis Society named parabens the nonallergen of the year for 2019. Parabens are a safe choice for preservatives given their low allergenic potential. Dermatologists can ease patient concerns about parabens by explaining that a causative role in adverse health effects has not been proven. Guests: Margo Reeder, MD (University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison); Amber Reck Atwater, MD (Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, N.C.) Show notes by Alicia Sonners, Melissa Sears, and Elizabeth Mechcatie. Contact us: podcasts@mdedge.com Twitter: @MDedgeDerm

15 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Are parabens safe? Plus, methotrexate for psoriatic arthritis, and tips for resurfacing skin of color
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