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The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

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The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

3
Followers
2
Plays
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About Us

An exchange focused on health issues and controversies of current concern to decision-makers around the world.

Latest Episodes

Drug-Resistant Infections: Confronting an Escalating Crisis

Antibiotics are a pillar of modern medicine. They have saved millions of lives. But as the use of antibiotics has increased, so has the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant microbes that have adapted to survive most, or all, of today’s antibiotics. The CDC reports that two million people are infected with drug-resistant bacteria every year in the United States, and the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance estimated that, around the world, 700,000 people die of such infections annually. That number stands to increase: the Review predicts that, by 2050, drug resistance could be responsible for 10 million deaths a year. And while these numbers are dominated by bacterial infections, fungal infections like Candida auris are also a threat, especially to vulnerable patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Despite drug resistance growing, the development of new antibiotics has slowed. How can policymakers help accelerate the pace of new drug development, and how can all of us—doctors, hospitals, and patients, as well as the agricultural sector—be better stewards of existing drugs? Forum panelists examined the scope of this looming crisis and look at how changes in policy and practice can help us stay one step ahead of these superbugs. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

58 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Drug-Resistant Infections: Confronting an Escalating Crisis

Mental Health and Wellness for Students of Color: Transitioning to College

Amid the bustle on U.S. college campuses, a growing challenge is causing concern. Many college students of color report mental health issues–including depression, anxiety and, among some groups, increased risk for suicide–that are not well understood or effectively addressed. According to surveys conducted by Harris Poll, students of color feel both more isolated and more overwhelmed than their white classmates. At the same time, they are less likely to seek counseling services on campus. Bringing together experts with diverse experiences and perspectives, this Forum explored how colleges can better support the social, emotional and mental health needs of students of color, particularly during the critical transition to college. Panelists emphasized evidence-based steps and policies that can help cultivate a positive and healthy experience for college students of color. This Forum event was presented in partnership with The Steve Fund and jointly with HuffPost on September 18, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

61 MINSEP 21
Comments
Mental Health and Wellness for Students of Color: Transitioning to College

The Measles Outbreak: Why Vaccines Matter

The U.S. officially eliminated measles nearly 20 years ago. Yet, this year, more than 1,100 cases have been reported, despite being preventable by vaccine. The CDC says the majority of cases are among those who were not vaccinated. This Forum looked at the drivers of the 2019 outbreaks and, more generally, the challenges of vaccine acceptance. Why do some parents delay or decline vaccinating their children? How might their concerns be addressed? What about exemptions? Why does the global picture matter? And what can be done once an outbreak begins? New polling data framed this discussion, providing a uniquely current picture of vaccine acceptance in the U.S. Part of The Dr. Lawrence H. and Roberta Cohn Forums, this event was presented jointly with PRI's The World & WGBH on September 12, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

61 MINSEP 17
Comments
The Measles Outbreak: Why Vaccines Matter

Deaths From Pregnancy and Childbirth: Why Are More U.S. Mothers Dying and What Can Be Done?

Maternal mortality dropped by almost half over the last 25 years around the world. However, in startling contrast, deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth doubled in the United States between 2000 and 2014, putting the nation second-to-last in maternal mortality among countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Further, pernicious racial disparities mean that black women in the United States face a deeply distressing three- to four-times higher risk of pregnancy-related deaths. What factors are driving these increases and disparities? What changes will narrow the survival gap between white and black women? How can health care systems more effectively prevent complications and poor outcomes? And how can mothers themselves and their communities be agents for change for a more equitable and safe delivery of the next generation? Part of The Dr. Lawrence H. and Roberta Cohn Forums, this event was presented jointly with PRI's The World & WGBH on March 4, 201...

56 MINMAR 7
Comments
Deaths From Pregnancy and Childbirth: Why Are More U.S. Mothers Dying and What Can Be Done?

The Spread of Hate and Racism: Confronting a Growing Public Crisis

In 2017, reports of hate crimes in the United States increased for the third consecutive year, according to the FBI. In addition to physical acts, such actions and other messages of racism, intolerance and extremism potentially impact large numbers of people online. In this Forum, experts tackled the painful and distressing spread of hate and racism. What social, political and psychological forces drive prejudice? How do modern media and the Internet enable and amplify hateful and racist messages? What are the impacts on the health and cohesion of society — and what can be done? This Forum event was presented jointly with PRI’s The World & WGBH on February 13, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

65 MINMAR 7
Comments
The Spread of Hate and Racism: Confronting a Growing Public Crisis

Rare Cancers: Charting a Faster Route to Treatment

Rare cancers present doctors, researchers, and patients with a unique set of challenges. Rare cancers often are diagnosed at later stages. Patients typically have limited treatment options, in part because the small number of diagnoses makes gold-standard clinical trials difficult. The picture is further complicated by increasingly expensive cancer drug costs. Yet, promises of emerging technologies, improved diagnostics, targeted therapies and pharmaceutical options provide hope. Calls for new ways to study rare cancers are being made so that patients can get access to better treatments more quickly. In this Forum, panelists discussed how advances in cancer immunology, innovative trial designs, and international data sharing can create new hope for patients with rare cancers. Supported by The Economist Group, this Forum event was presented on February 1, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

59 MINMAR 7
Comments
Rare Cancers: Charting a Faster Route to Treatment

The New Congress: What’s Next on Crucial Health and Education Issues?

In this uniquely insightful Forum, experts examined key health and education policies — and their broad implications — that are likely to be enacted by the new Congress. The panelists discussed the current climate, including the government shutdown. For background, the discussion drew on a newly-released poll by POLITICO and the Harvard Chan School. This Forum event was presented jointly with POLITICO LLC on January 23, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

61 MINMAR 7
Comments
The New Congress: What’s Next on Crucial Health and Education Issues?

Being Seriously Ill in the U.S.: Financial and Healthcare Impacts

What is it like to be seriously ill in America today? From heavy financial burdens — despite insurance — to varied hospital experiences, to impacts on caregivers, people with serious illnesses shared their experiences through a recent poll by the New York Times, the Commonwealth Fund, and the Harvard Chan School. The findings carry significant implications for national debates on basic health insurance requirements and on the reach of programs such as Medicare. In this Forum, a panel of experts unpacked the poll findings, as well as explored practical ways in which health systems can change to help the most ill Americans. This Harvard event was presented in collaboration with The Commonwealth Fund on December 5, 2018. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

61 MIN2018 DEC 7
Comments
Being Seriously Ill in the U.S.: Financial and Healthcare Impacts

The Health and Economic Concerns of Rural Americans

What do rural Americans say are the biggest problems in their local communities? A new poll finds that drug/opioid abuse and economic concerns are the top challenges. When it comes to drug addiction and abuse, a majority of rural Americans say opioid addiction is a serious problem in their community. On economic issues, rural Americans largely hold negative views of their local economy, but nearly one-third have seen economic progress in recent years. What may help? A majority of rural Americans believe outside help will be necessary to solve major community problems in the future, and many believe government will play an important role. Convened shortly before National Rural Health Day and after the nation’s midterm elections, a panel of experts explored the public health and policy implications of these findings within the broader context of life in rural America. This Forum event was presented jointly with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NPR on November 9, 2018. Watch the...

62 MIN2018 DEC 5
Comments
The Health and Economic Concerns of Rural Americans

The 2018 Midterm Elections: Key Issues for Healthcare

Healthcare has again emerged as a pivotal issue for American voters. Conversations around preexisting conditions protections, short-term health plans, drug costs and premium rates are as contentious as ever. Debates around Medicare and Medicaid have grabbed headlines, while the Affordable Care Act has remained divisive, despite helping millions become insured. Against this backdrop, state governments have forged ahead with their own health policy decisions, adding to the complex tangle of healthcare policies in the country. This Forum panel explored what’s at stake in the 2018 midterm elections for Americans and their healthcare future. This Forum event was presented jointly with Reuters November 1, 2018. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

57 MIN2018 DEC 5
Comments
The 2018 Midterm Elections: Key Issues for Healthcare

Latest Episodes

Drug-Resistant Infections: Confronting an Escalating Crisis

Antibiotics are a pillar of modern medicine. They have saved millions of lives. But as the use of antibiotics has increased, so has the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant microbes that have adapted to survive most, or all, of today’s antibiotics. The CDC reports that two million people are infected with drug-resistant bacteria every year in the United States, and the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance estimated that, around the world, 700,000 people die of such infections annually. That number stands to increase: the Review predicts that, by 2050, drug resistance could be responsible for 10 million deaths a year. And while these numbers are dominated by bacterial infections, fungal infections like Candida auris are also a threat, especially to vulnerable patients in hospitals and nursing homes. Despite drug resistance growing, the development of new antibiotics has slowed. How can policymakers help accelerate the pace of new drug development, and how can all of us—doctors, hospitals, and patients, as well as the agricultural sector—be better stewards of existing drugs? Forum panelists examined the scope of this looming crisis and look at how changes in policy and practice can help us stay one step ahead of these superbugs. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

58 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Drug-Resistant Infections: Confronting an Escalating Crisis

Mental Health and Wellness for Students of Color: Transitioning to College

Amid the bustle on U.S. college campuses, a growing challenge is causing concern. Many college students of color report mental health issues–including depression, anxiety and, among some groups, increased risk for suicide–that are not well understood or effectively addressed. According to surveys conducted by Harris Poll, students of color feel both more isolated and more overwhelmed than their white classmates. At the same time, they are less likely to seek counseling services on campus. Bringing together experts with diverse experiences and perspectives, this Forum explored how colleges can better support the social, emotional and mental health needs of students of color, particularly during the critical transition to college. Panelists emphasized evidence-based steps and policies that can help cultivate a positive and healthy experience for college students of color. This Forum event was presented in partnership with The Steve Fund and jointly with HuffPost on September 18, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

61 MINSEP 21
Comments
Mental Health and Wellness for Students of Color: Transitioning to College

The Measles Outbreak: Why Vaccines Matter

The U.S. officially eliminated measles nearly 20 years ago. Yet, this year, more than 1,100 cases have been reported, despite being preventable by vaccine. The CDC says the majority of cases are among those who were not vaccinated. This Forum looked at the drivers of the 2019 outbreaks and, more generally, the challenges of vaccine acceptance. Why do some parents delay or decline vaccinating their children? How might their concerns be addressed? What about exemptions? Why does the global picture matter? And what can be done once an outbreak begins? New polling data framed this discussion, providing a uniquely current picture of vaccine acceptance in the U.S. Part of The Dr. Lawrence H. and Roberta Cohn Forums, this event was presented jointly with PRI's The World & WGBH on September 12, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

61 MINSEP 17
Comments
The Measles Outbreak: Why Vaccines Matter

Deaths From Pregnancy and Childbirth: Why Are More U.S. Mothers Dying and What Can Be Done?

Maternal mortality dropped by almost half over the last 25 years around the world. However, in startling contrast, deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth doubled in the United States between 2000 and 2014, putting the nation second-to-last in maternal mortality among countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Further, pernicious racial disparities mean that black women in the United States face a deeply distressing three- to four-times higher risk of pregnancy-related deaths. What factors are driving these increases and disparities? What changes will narrow the survival gap between white and black women? How can health care systems more effectively prevent complications and poor outcomes? And how can mothers themselves and their communities be agents for change for a more equitable and safe delivery of the next generation? Part of The Dr. Lawrence H. and Roberta Cohn Forums, this event was presented jointly with PRI's The World & WGBH on March 4, 201...

56 MINMAR 7
Comments
Deaths From Pregnancy and Childbirth: Why Are More U.S. Mothers Dying and What Can Be Done?

The Spread of Hate and Racism: Confronting a Growing Public Crisis

In 2017, reports of hate crimes in the United States increased for the third consecutive year, according to the FBI. In addition to physical acts, such actions and other messages of racism, intolerance and extremism potentially impact large numbers of people online. In this Forum, experts tackled the painful and distressing spread of hate and racism. What social, political and psychological forces drive prejudice? How do modern media and the Internet enable and amplify hateful and racist messages? What are the impacts on the health and cohesion of society — and what can be done? This Forum event was presented jointly with PRI’s The World & WGBH on February 13, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

65 MINMAR 7
Comments
The Spread of Hate and Racism: Confronting a Growing Public Crisis

Rare Cancers: Charting a Faster Route to Treatment

Rare cancers present doctors, researchers, and patients with a unique set of challenges. Rare cancers often are diagnosed at later stages. Patients typically have limited treatment options, in part because the small number of diagnoses makes gold-standard clinical trials difficult. The picture is further complicated by increasingly expensive cancer drug costs. Yet, promises of emerging technologies, improved diagnostics, targeted therapies and pharmaceutical options provide hope. Calls for new ways to study rare cancers are being made so that patients can get access to better treatments more quickly. In this Forum, panelists discussed how advances in cancer immunology, innovative trial designs, and international data sharing can create new hope for patients with rare cancers. Supported by The Economist Group, this Forum event was presented on February 1, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

59 MINMAR 7
Comments
Rare Cancers: Charting a Faster Route to Treatment

The New Congress: What’s Next on Crucial Health and Education Issues?

In this uniquely insightful Forum, experts examined key health and education policies — and their broad implications — that are likely to be enacted by the new Congress. The panelists discussed the current climate, including the government shutdown. For background, the discussion drew on a newly-released poll by POLITICO and the Harvard Chan School. This Forum event was presented jointly with POLITICO LLC on January 23, 2019. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

61 MINMAR 7
Comments
The New Congress: What’s Next on Crucial Health and Education Issues?

Being Seriously Ill in the U.S.: Financial and Healthcare Impacts

What is it like to be seriously ill in America today? From heavy financial burdens — despite insurance — to varied hospital experiences, to impacts on caregivers, people with serious illnesses shared their experiences through a recent poll by the New York Times, the Commonwealth Fund, and the Harvard Chan School. The findings carry significant implications for national debates on basic health insurance requirements and on the reach of programs such as Medicare. In this Forum, a panel of experts unpacked the poll findings, as well as explored practical ways in which health systems can change to help the most ill Americans. This Harvard event was presented in collaboration with The Commonwealth Fund on December 5, 2018. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

61 MIN2018 DEC 7
Comments
Being Seriously Ill in the U.S.: Financial and Healthcare Impacts

The Health and Economic Concerns of Rural Americans

What do rural Americans say are the biggest problems in their local communities? A new poll finds that drug/opioid abuse and economic concerns are the top challenges. When it comes to drug addiction and abuse, a majority of rural Americans say opioid addiction is a serious problem in their community. On economic issues, rural Americans largely hold negative views of their local economy, but nearly one-third have seen economic progress in recent years. What may help? A majority of rural Americans believe outside help will be necessary to solve major community problems in the future, and many believe government will play an important role. Convened shortly before National Rural Health Day and after the nation’s midterm elections, a panel of experts explored the public health and policy implications of these findings within the broader context of life in rural America. This Forum event was presented jointly with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NPR on November 9, 2018. Watch the...

62 MIN2018 DEC 5
Comments
The Health and Economic Concerns of Rural Americans

The 2018 Midterm Elections: Key Issues for Healthcare

Healthcare has again emerged as a pivotal issue for American voters. Conversations around preexisting conditions protections, short-term health plans, drug costs and premium rates are as contentious as ever. Debates around Medicare and Medicaid have grabbed headlines, while the Affordable Care Act has remained divisive, despite helping millions become insured. Against this backdrop, state governments have forged ahead with their own health policy decisions, adding to the complex tangle of healthcare policies in the country. This Forum panel explored what’s at stake in the 2018 midterm elections for Americans and their healthcare future. This Forum event was presented jointly with Reuters November 1, 2018. Watch the entire series: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/

57 MIN2018 DEC 5
Comments
The 2018 Midterm Elections: Key Issues for Healthcare
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