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Complexity and Systemic Risk: Hilary Term Seminar Series 2010

Oxford University

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Complexity and Systemic Risk: Hilary Term Seminar Series 2010
Complexity and Systemic Risk: Hilary Term Seminar Series 2010

Complexity and Systemic Risk: Hilary Term Seminar Series 2010

Oxford University

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About Us

Many of the systemic risks that we will need to address in the 21st century depend crucially on the often unanticipated consequences of interactions within and between different types of systems. The emerging, interdisciplinary field of complex systems provides a shared language as well as mathematical and computational models that can help us understand the challenges we face in this increasingly interconnected world. In this seminar series, leading researchers will explore the implications of a complex systems approach for systemic risks in ecosystems, financial systems, urban systems, and human societies.

Latest Episodes

Cooperation, Norms and Conflict: Towards Simulating the Foundations of Society

In order to understand social systems, it is essential to identify the circumstances under which individuals spontaneously start cooperating or developing shared behaviors, norms, and culture. In this connection, it is important to study the role of social mechanisms such as repeated interactions, group selection, network formation, costly punishment and group pressure, and how they allow us to transform social dilemmas into interactive situations that promote the social system. Furthermore, it is interesting to study the role that social inequality, the protection of private property, or the on-going globalization play for the resulting 'character' of a social system (cooperative or not). It is well-known that social cooperation can suddenly break down, giving rise to poverty or conflict. The decline of high cultures and the outbreak of civil wars or revolutions are well-known examples. The more surprising is that one can develop an integrated game-theoretical description of phenom...

59 MIN2010 MAR 5
Comments
Cooperation, Norms and Conflict: Towards Simulating the Foundations of Society

Predicting the Behaviour of Techno-Social Systems: How Informatics and Computing Help to Fight Off Global Pandemics

We live in an increasingly interconnected world of 'techno-social' systems, where infrastructures composed of different technological layers are interoperating within the social component that drives their use and development. The multi-scale nature and complexity of these networks are crucial features in understanding and managing them. In the last decade advances in performance in computer technology, data acquisition and complex networks theory allow the generation of sophisticated simulations on supercomputer infrastructures to anticipate the spreading pattern of a pandemic, predict the traffic pattern of successful web sites or provides insight and recommendations in the case of natural or intentional disruptive events. In particular I will use the example of the current H1N1 pandemic and present computing tools with the ambition of anticipating trends, evaluating risks and eventually managing future public policies in real time. Delivered by Professor Alessandro Vespignani: Pr...

72 MIN2010 FEB 26
Comments
Predicting the Behaviour of Techno-Social Systems: How Informatics and Computing Help to Fight Off Global Pandemics

Ocean Circulation and Climate: Observing and Modelling the Global Ocean

The oceans are a critical component of the climate system, storing roughly 1000 times as much heat, and 50 times as much carbon, as the atmosphere. In this talk, Professor David Marshall (21st Century Ocean Institute, University of Oxford) will discuss the challenges of predicting the evolution of a complex system that is grossly under-sampled and spans a bewildering range of scales in both space and time. These challenges will be illustrated through the important but over-sensationalised problem of how the Gulf Stream may change over the next century and impacts on European climate. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

60 MIN2010 FEB 19
Comments
Ocean Circulation and Climate: Observing and Modelling the Global Ocean

Latest Episodes

Cooperation, Norms and Conflict: Towards Simulating the Foundations of Society

In order to understand social systems, it is essential to identify the circumstances under which individuals spontaneously start cooperating or developing shared behaviors, norms, and culture. In this connection, it is important to study the role of social mechanisms such as repeated interactions, group selection, network formation, costly punishment and group pressure, and how they allow us to transform social dilemmas into interactive situations that promote the social system. Furthermore, it is interesting to study the role that social inequality, the protection of private property, or the on-going globalization play for the resulting 'character' of a social system (cooperative or not). It is well-known that social cooperation can suddenly break down, giving rise to poverty or conflict. The decline of high cultures and the outbreak of civil wars or revolutions are well-known examples. The more surprising is that one can develop an integrated game-theoretical description of phenom...

59 MIN2010 MAR 5
Comments
Cooperation, Norms and Conflict: Towards Simulating the Foundations of Society

Predicting the Behaviour of Techno-Social Systems: How Informatics and Computing Help to Fight Off Global Pandemics

We live in an increasingly interconnected world of 'techno-social' systems, where infrastructures composed of different technological layers are interoperating within the social component that drives their use and development. The multi-scale nature and complexity of these networks are crucial features in understanding and managing them. In the last decade advances in performance in computer technology, data acquisition and complex networks theory allow the generation of sophisticated simulations on supercomputer infrastructures to anticipate the spreading pattern of a pandemic, predict the traffic pattern of successful web sites or provides insight and recommendations in the case of natural or intentional disruptive events. In particular I will use the example of the current H1N1 pandemic and present computing tools with the ambition of anticipating trends, evaluating risks and eventually managing future public policies in real time. Delivered by Professor Alessandro Vespignani: Pr...

72 MIN2010 FEB 26
Comments
Predicting the Behaviour of Techno-Social Systems: How Informatics and Computing Help to Fight Off Global Pandemics

Ocean Circulation and Climate: Observing and Modelling the Global Ocean

The oceans are a critical component of the climate system, storing roughly 1000 times as much heat, and 50 times as much carbon, as the atmosphere. In this talk, Professor David Marshall (21st Century Ocean Institute, University of Oxford) will discuss the challenges of predicting the evolution of a complex system that is grossly under-sampled and spans a bewildering range of scales in both space and time. These challenges will be illustrated through the important but over-sensationalised problem of how the Gulf Stream may change over the next century and impacts on European climate. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

60 MIN2010 FEB 19
Comments
Ocean Circulation and Climate: Observing and Modelling the Global Ocean

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