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Eavesdrop on Experts

University of Melbourne

3
Followers
4
Plays
Eavesdrop on Experts
Eavesdrop on Experts

Eavesdrop on Experts

University of Melbourne

3
Followers
4
Plays
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About Us

Overhear researchers talk about what they do and why they do it. Hear them obsess, confess and profess - changing the world one experiment, one paper and one interview at a time. Listen in as seasoned eavesdropper Chris Hatzis follows reporters Dr Andi Horvath and Steve Grimwade on their meetings with magnificent minds. Made possible by the University of Melbourne.

Latest Episodes

The genomic clues to disease

Genomics is a rapidly evolving technology that can help identify the genetic cause of a condition in a person. It can also find a person's predisposition to various diseases like some cancers. When science first sequenced all the genes in the entire human genome, it became possible for scientists to compare the genomic patterns of larger groups of people - looking for more clues to health and disease in the 'big data'. Professor Clara Gaff was awarded the Most Valuable Woman in Leadership in the Biomedical Space for 2019 for her work as Executive Director of the Melbourne Genomics Health Alliance. And the way genomic technology has advanced still stuns her. "The rates of diagnosis using this technology surpasses what I had expected," she says. "It's something I could never have imagined." Episode recorded: May 16, 2019. Interviewer: Dr Andi Horvath. Producer, audio engineer and editor: Chris Hatzis. Co-production: Silvi Vann-Wall and Dr Andi Horvath. Banner image: Shutterstock.

32 MIN1 weeks ago
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The genomic clues to disease

How can we tell if an animal is depressed?

There's been a growing shift in animal welfare; an increasing awareness of the mental wellbeing of animals rather than purely their biological functioning - that is, an animal's physiology, reproduction and injury. Mike Mendl, professor of Animal Behaviour and Welfare at Bristol University in the UK, is drawing on animal behaviour, human psychology and cognitive neuroscience to improve animal welfare. "Data from human studies shows that people who are unhappy or depressed tend to be much more pessimistic about the future and they make more careful, cautious decisions about ambiguity," says Professor Mendl. Professor Mendl is working develop ways of measuring animal welfare scientifically and with aim of improving the quality or conditions for all animals. Episode recorded: May 15, 2019. Interviewer: Dr Andi Horvath. Producer, audio engineer and editor: Chris Hatzis. Co-production: Silvi Vann-Wall and Dr Andi Horvath. Banner image: Getty Images.

-1 s3 weeks ago
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How can we tell if an animal is depressed?

The complex relationship between prostate cancer and obesity

Previously seen as an older man's disease, increased rates of prostate cancer in younger men has been associated with an increased incidence of obesity. "There are a number of changes that happen in the body when you have obesity, that could lead to the progression of cancer," says Professor Watt, Head of the Department of Physiology, School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Melbourne. "Essentially what we've found is that, unlike other cancer types, which rely heavily on glucose to fuel both their growth and their proliferation, prostate cancer cells are very highly reliant on fatty acids." Working with researchers at Monash University, Professor Watt's group have shown that they can block the capacity of these prostate cells to take up fatty acids which slows their growth dramatically. "We think this has very important implications in understanding both the progression of the disease, but also ways in which we might be able to therapeutically target prostate cancer in the future." Episode recorded: May 6, 2019. Interviewer: Dr Andi Horvath. Producer, audio engineer and editor: Chris Hatzis. Co-producers: Silvi Vann-Wall and Dr Andi Horvath. Banner image: Shutterstock.

-1 sMAY 15
Comments
The complex relationship between prostate cancer and obesity

Latest Episodes

The genomic clues to disease

Genomics is a rapidly evolving technology that can help identify the genetic cause of a condition in a person. It can also find a person's predisposition to various diseases like some cancers. When science first sequenced all the genes in the entire human genome, it became possible for scientists to compare the genomic patterns of larger groups of people - looking for more clues to health and disease in the 'big data'. Professor Clara Gaff was awarded the Most Valuable Woman in Leadership in the Biomedical Space for 2019 for her work as Executive Director of the Melbourne Genomics Health Alliance. And the way genomic technology has advanced still stuns her. "The rates of diagnosis using this technology surpasses what I had expected," she says. "It's something I could never have imagined." Episode recorded: May 16, 2019. Interviewer: Dr Andi Horvath. Producer, audio engineer and editor: Chris Hatzis. Co-production: Silvi Vann-Wall and Dr Andi Horvath. Banner image: Shutterstock.

32 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The genomic clues to disease

How can we tell if an animal is depressed?

There's been a growing shift in animal welfare; an increasing awareness of the mental wellbeing of animals rather than purely their biological functioning - that is, an animal's physiology, reproduction and injury. Mike Mendl, professor of Animal Behaviour and Welfare at Bristol University in the UK, is drawing on animal behaviour, human psychology and cognitive neuroscience to improve animal welfare. "Data from human studies shows that people who are unhappy or depressed tend to be much more pessimistic about the future and they make more careful, cautious decisions about ambiguity," says Professor Mendl. Professor Mendl is working develop ways of measuring animal welfare scientifically and with aim of improving the quality or conditions for all animals. Episode recorded: May 15, 2019. Interviewer: Dr Andi Horvath. Producer, audio engineer and editor: Chris Hatzis. Co-production: Silvi Vann-Wall and Dr Andi Horvath. Banner image: Getty Images.

-1 s3 weeks ago
Comments
How can we tell if an animal is depressed?

The complex relationship between prostate cancer and obesity

Previously seen as an older man's disease, increased rates of prostate cancer in younger men has been associated with an increased incidence of obesity. "There are a number of changes that happen in the body when you have obesity, that could lead to the progression of cancer," says Professor Watt, Head of the Department of Physiology, School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Melbourne. "Essentially what we've found is that, unlike other cancer types, which rely heavily on glucose to fuel both their growth and their proliferation, prostate cancer cells are very highly reliant on fatty acids." Working with researchers at Monash University, Professor Watt's group have shown that they can block the capacity of these prostate cells to take up fatty acids which slows their growth dramatically. "We think this has very important implications in understanding both the progression of the disease, but also ways in which we might be able to therapeutically target prostate cancer in the future." Episode recorded: May 6, 2019. Interviewer: Dr Andi Horvath. Producer, audio engineer and editor: Chris Hatzis. Co-producers: Silvi Vann-Wall and Dr Andi Horvath. Banner image: Shutterstock.

-1 sMAY 15
Comments
The complex relationship between prostate cancer and obesity

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