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Wofford Arboretum Central Campus

Wofford College

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Wofford Arboretum Central Campus
Wofford Arboretum Central Campus

Wofford Arboretum Central Campus

Wofford College

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OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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Take Wofford's Arboretum tour with you on your iPod as you walk around Wofford's beautiful campus.

Latest Episodes

55.Chestnut Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 60 – 70 Spread: Irregular Habit: Round and relatively dense Light: Best in full sun Soil: Normally found in poor, dry, rocky soil, maximum growth occurs in well-drained, moist soil Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1 – 1 1/4 long by 3/4 wide, rich brown color Landscape use: Good medium-size tree for use as a specimen tree, in parks and public places History: Native range is from southern Maine and Ontario to South Carolina and Alabama; cultivated in 1688 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Dark brown to black bark; sweet acorn provides food for wildlife

46 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
55.Chestnut Oak

54.Shumard Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 9 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 100 Spread: 40 – 60 Habit: In youth: pyramidal; At maturity: more spreading Light: Best in full sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained soil preferable Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: ovate acorn 3/4 – 1 long Landscape use: Magnificent shade tree, great for streets, golf courses, and campuses; not suitable for small area History: Native range is Kansas to southern Michigan to North Carolina, Florida and Texas; introduced in 1907 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Drought tolerant; good russet-red to red fall color

45 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
54.Shumard Oak

52.Aurora Dogwood

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 8 Height: 20 – 30 Spread: equals height Habit: Vigorous, erect and wide-spreading throughout Light: Best in sun or partial shade Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile soil preferable Flowers: true flowers are inconspicuous, surrounded by large pointed bracts 1 1/2 – 2 long; floral bracts are white and have a velvety texture Fruit: none Landscape use: Useful as specimen tree or accent in background; excellent border or hedge for large areas; attractive against large evergreens History: One clone in a series of hybrids developed by Elwin Orton at Rutgers University. The hybrids resulted from crosses between C. kousa, C. florida, and C. nuttallii Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Very floriferous; develops exfoliating bark charactersitics with age; leaves are dark green

1 MIN2007 JUN 28
Comments
52.Aurora Dogwood

53.Southern Red Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 70 – 80 Spread: 3/4 height Habit: Rounded outline at maturity Light: Best in full sun Soil: Characteristic soil is dry and poor, but develops best on loamy ridges Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1/2 long Landscape use: Nice shade tree for use in large areas; similar uses to white oak History: Native range is Virginia to Florida, west to southern Illinois and Arkansas; introduced in 1763 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Leaves are dark green above and yellowish-brown beneath

42 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
53.Southern Red Oak

51.Swamp Chestnut Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: larger than 60 – 70 Spread: Irregular Habit: Round and relatively dense Light: Best in full sun Soil: Moister soils than chestnut oak Flowers: insignificant hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1 – 1 1/4 long by 3/4 wide, rich brown color Landscape use: Good medium size tree for use as a specimen tree, in parks and public places History: Native range is from southern Maine and Ontario to South Carolina and Alabama; cultivated in 1688 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Bark is scaly, similar to white oak, whereas chestnut oak is deeply grooved; pubescent on underside of leaves and branchlets

48 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
51.Swamp Chestnut Oak

50.Winged Elm

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 60 – 70 Spread: close to 1/2 its height Habit: Spreading branches forming a round-topped oblong head Light: Sun or partial shade Soil: Rich, moist soil preferable Flowers: greenish-red, open in mid to late February Fruit: winged fruit Landscape use: Good lawn and street shade tree History: Native range is Virginia to Florida, west to Illinois, Oklahoma, and Texas; introduced in 1820 Pests\Problems: Pests: bark aphid, wood borer, beech scale; Problems: powdery mildew (leaves appear white) Significant Features: Corky, winged bark on branches

44 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
50.Winged Elm

49.Bur Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 2 – 8 Height: 70 – 80 with a maximum of 100 Spread: equal or greater than height Habit: In youth: weakly pyramidal to oval; At maturity: massive trunk and broad crown with stout branches Light: Best in full sun Soil: Very adaptable to various soils Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 3/4 – 1 1/2 long Landscape use: Too large for home landscapes; excellent for parks or large areas History: Native range is Nova Scotia to Pennsylvania, west to Manitoba and Texas; introduced in 1811 Pests\Problems: Pests: none; Problems: various types of galls; roots may crack driveway or patio surfaces if planted too close; powdery mildew; canker; anthracnose Significant Features: Fringed acorn cup, exceptional size; some display corky ridges on small branches

59 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
49.Bur Oak

48.Scarlet Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 9 Height: 70 – 75 with a maximum of 100 Spread: 40 – 50 Habit: Symmetrical with rounded crown; branches gradually spreading and curving upward Light: Full sun or partial shade Soil: Generally found on dry, sandy soils; well-drained, medium fertile; slightly moist soil preferable Flowers: hanging catkins Fruit: ovoid acorn 3/4 long enclosed in a deep, bowl-like cup Landscape use: Excellent for framing, background, shade, and street plantings History: Native range is Maine to Florida, west to Minnesota and Missouri; introduced in 1691 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Excellent foliage; pleasing fall color; rapid growth

50 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
48.Scarlet Oak

47.Water Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 3 – 9 Height: 60 – 100 Spread: 50 – 80 Habit: Upright-rounded to broad-rounded with wide-spreading branches at maturity Light: Best in full sun or partial shade Soil: Best in deep, moist, well-drained soils, acidic soil preferable Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1/2 long and wide Landscape use: Majestic specimen tree, splendid for permanent planting in spacious areas; among the most handsome of oaks History: Native range is Maine to Florida, west to Minnesota and Texas; introduced in 1724 Pests\Problems: Pests: none; Problems: various types of galls; roots may crack driveway or patio surfaces if planted too close; powdery mildew; canker; anthracnose Significant Features: Massive spreading branches that twist with age; variable ashy gray bark often arranged in vertical blocks

59 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
47.Water Oak

46.Katsuratree

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 100 Spread: 20 – 30 Habit: In youth: pyramidal, full and dense; At maturity: greatly variable Light: Full sun Soil: Rich, moist soil, well-drained preferable Flowers: not showy; open before the leaves Fruit: small, 1/2 – 3/4 long pods, 2 – 4 together on a short stalk Landscape use: Excellent for residential properties, parks, golf courses, commercial areas History: Native range is China and Japan; introduced in 1865 Pests\Problems: Pests: none; Problems: inconsequential sun scald and bark splitting Significant Features: Yellow to magnificent apricot fall color; heart-shaped leaves

52 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
46.Katsuratree

Latest Episodes

55.Chestnut Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 60 – 70 Spread: Irregular Habit: Round and relatively dense Light: Best in full sun Soil: Normally found in poor, dry, rocky soil, maximum growth occurs in well-drained, moist soil Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1 – 1 1/4 long by 3/4 wide, rich brown color Landscape use: Good medium-size tree for use as a specimen tree, in parks and public places History: Native range is from southern Maine and Ontario to South Carolina and Alabama; cultivated in 1688 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Dark brown to black bark; sweet acorn provides food for wildlife

46 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
55.Chestnut Oak

54.Shumard Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 9 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 100 Spread: 40 – 60 Habit: In youth: pyramidal; At maturity: more spreading Light: Best in full sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained soil preferable Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: ovate acorn 3/4 – 1 long Landscape use: Magnificent shade tree, great for streets, golf courses, and campuses; not suitable for small area History: Native range is Kansas to southern Michigan to North Carolina, Florida and Texas; introduced in 1907 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Drought tolerant; good russet-red to red fall color

45 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
54.Shumard Oak

52.Aurora Dogwood

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 8 Height: 20 – 30 Spread: equals height Habit: Vigorous, erect and wide-spreading throughout Light: Best in sun or partial shade Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile soil preferable Flowers: true flowers are inconspicuous, surrounded by large pointed bracts 1 1/2 – 2 long; floral bracts are white and have a velvety texture Fruit: none Landscape use: Useful as specimen tree or accent in background; excellent border or hedge for large areas; attractive against large evergreens History: One clone in a series of hybrids developed by Elwin Orton at Rutgers University. The hybrids resulted from crosses between C. kousa, C. florida, and C. nuttallii Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Very floriferous; develops exfoliating bark charactersitics with age; leaves are dark green

1 MIN2007 JUN 28
Comments
52.Aurora Dogwood

53.Southern Red Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 70 – 80 Spread: 3/4 height Habit: Rounded outline at maturity Light: Best in full sun Soil: Characteristic soil is dry and poor, but develops best on loamy ridges Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1/2 long Landscape use: Nice shade tree for use in large areas; similar uses to white oak History: Native range is Virginia to Florida, west to southern Illinois and Arkansas; introduced in 1763 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Leaves are dark green above and yellowish-brown beneath

42 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
53.Southern Red Oak

51.Swamp Chestnut Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: larger than 60 – 70 Spread: Irregular Habit: Round and relatively dense Light: Best in full sun Soil: Moister soils than chestnut oak Flowers: insignificant hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1 – 1 1/4 long by 3/4 wide, rich brown color Landscape use: Good medium size tree for use as a specimen tree, in parks and public places History: Native range is from southern Maine and Ontario to South Carolina and Alabama; cultivated in 1688 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Bark is scaly, similar to white oak, whereas chestnut oak is deeply grooved; pubescent on underside of leaves and branchlets

48 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
51.Swamp Chestnut Oak

50.Winged Elm

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 60 – 70 Spread: close to 1/2 its height Habit: Spreading branches forming a round-topped oblong head Light: Sun or partial shade Soil: Rich, moist soil preferable Flowers: greenish-red, open in mid to late February Fruit: winged fruit Landscape use: Good lawn and street shade tree History: Native range is Virginia to Florida, west to Illinois, Oklahoma, and Texas; introduced in 1820 Pests\Problems: Pests: bark aphid, wood borer, beech scale; Problems: powdery mildew (leaves appear white) Significant Features: Corky, winged bark on branches

44 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
50.Winged Elm

49.Bur Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 2 – 8 Height: 70 – 80 with a maximum of 100 Spread: equal or greater than height Habit: In youth: weakly pyramidal to oval; At maturity: massive trunk and broad crown with stout branches Light: Best in full sun Soil: Very adaptable to various soils Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 3/4 – 1 1/2 long Landscape use: Too large for home landscapes; excellent for parks or large areas History: Native range is Nova Scotia to Pennsylvania, west to Manitoba and Texas; introduced in 1811 Pests\Problems: Pests: none; Problems: various types of galls; roots may crack driveway or patio surfaces if planted too close; powdery mildew; canker; anthracnose Significant Features: Fringed acorn cup, exceptional size; some display corky ridges on small branches

59 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
49.Bur Oak

48.Scarlet Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 9 Height: 70 – 75 with a maximum of 100 Spread: 40 – 50 Habit: Symmetrical with rounded crown; branches gradually spreading and curving upward Light: Full sun or partial shade Soil: Generally found on dry, sandy soils; well-drained, medium fertile; slightly moist soil preferable Flowers: hanging catkins Fruit: ovoid acorn 3/4 long enclosed in a deep, bowl-like cup Landscape use: Excellent for framing, background, shade, and street plantings History: Native range is Maine to Florida, west to Minnesota and Missouri; introduced in 1691 Pests\Problems: None Significant Features: Excellent foliage; pleasing fall color; rapid growth

50 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
48.Scarlet Oak

47.Water Oak

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 3 – 9 Height: 60 – 100 Spread: 50 – 80 Habit: Upright-rounded to broad-rounded with wide-spreading branches at maturity Light: Best in full sun or partial shade Soil: Best in deep, moist, well-drained soils, acidic soil preferable Flowers: inconspicuous, hanging catkins Fruit: acorn 1/2 long and wide Landscape use: Majestic specimen tree, splendid for permanent planting in spacious areas; among the most handsome of oaks History: Native range is Maine to Florida, west to Minnesota and Texas; introduced in 1724 Pests\Problems: Pests: none; Problems: various types of galls; roots may crack driveway or patio surfaces if planted too close; powdery mildew; canker; anthracnose Significant Features: Massive spreading branches that twist with age; variable ashy gray bark often arranged in vertical blocks

59 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
47.Water Oak

46.Katsuratree

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 100 Spread: 20 – 30 Habit: In youth: pyramidal, full and dense; At maturity: greatly variable Light: Full sun Soil: Rich, moist soil, well-drained preferable Flowers: not showy; open before the leaves Fruit: small, 1/2 – 3/4 long pods, 2 – 4 together on a short stalk Landscape use: Excellent for residential properties, parks, golf courses, commercial areas History: Native range is China and Japan; introduced in 1865 Pests\Problems: Pests: none; Problems: inconsequential sun scald and bark splitting Significant Features: Yellow to magnificent apricot fall color; heart-shaped leaves

52 s2007 JUN 28
Comments
46.Katsuratree
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