title

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

Albert Zambone

44
Followers
269
Plays
Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it
Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

Albert Zambone

44
Followers
269
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

Latest Episodes

Episode 134: Inventing Disaster, or, the Creation of a Culture of Calamity

Cultures give us guardrails for behavior, beyond which we can only pass with difficulty. They also give us what to say in a difficult situation, a script that helps us to get the words out, even gives us a template for how to behave. Sometimes these guardrails shift, and the scripts and templates are rewritten. […]

76 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Episode 134: Inventing Disaster, or, the Creation of a Culture of Calamity

Episode 133: Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers, or, Rabies in the City

Hello, in antebellum and late 19th century New York City, nothing could clear a street faster than the cry of “mad dog!” Rabies was perhaps the most feared disease of the era; and because animals and humans lived in such close proximity, even as New York was growing into a city of millions, […]

60 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 133: Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers, or, Rabies in the City

Episode 132: Armies of Deliverance, or, a New Interpretation of the American Civil War

“Of all the ongoing debates over the Civil War,” writes my guest Elizabeth Varon, “perhaps none has proven so difficult to resolve as the issue of Northern war aims.” Some historians have emphasized, particularly in the last few years, the important point of consensus between many Republicans and Democrats that the Union needed to […]

67 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Episode 132: Armies of Deliverance, or, a New Interpretation of the American Civil War

Episode 131: Red Meat Republic, or, the American Beef Economy of the Late Nineteenth Century

Americans love red meat. More particularly, they love beef. Always have. Archaeology of colonial America shows that British North Americans ate as much beef as they possibly could. Fish? No thank you. Beef? More, please. This British chauvinism for beef (the French, after all, called the English “les rosbifs”) became an American chauvinism. But where […]

49 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Episode 131: Red Meat Republic, or, the American Beef Economy of the Late Nineteenth Century

Episode 130: What’s the Point of College, or, Why There Should Be No Business Majors on Campus

Today’s guest, Johann Neem, has recently written an essay in the Chronicle of Higher Education entitled “Abolish the Business Major”. Here’s a taste: The business major is for students who want a college degree without a college education. The philosopher Tal Brewer haswrittenthat the very notion of business school is an “oxymoron.” The word […]

76 MINOCT 16
Comments
Episode 130: What’s the Point of College, or, Why There Should Be No Business Majors on Campus

Episode 129: Who Fought for the South, or, the Myth of Black Confederates

On January 12, 1865, the Charleston Mercury gave its pronouncement upon plans in the Confederate Congress to enlist Black southerners into the Confederate Army in exchange for their emancipation: By the compact we made with Virginia and the other States of this Confederacy, South Carolina will stand to the bitter end of destruction. By that […]

64 MINOCT 9
Comments
Episode 129: Who Fought for the South, or, the Myth of Black Confederates

Episode 128: Unbundling or Rebundling, and Making College Integrated

Many would-be college reformers, says my guest Chris Gallagher, talk about “unbundling”. By this they mean breaking a college into parts to save on costs and increase efficiency. In reality, Gallagher argues, colleges are already far too unbundled; or, perhaps, dis-integrated. What we need he argues are integrated colleges, ones which are coherently designed so […]

61 MINOCT 2
Comments
Episode 128: Unbundling or Rebundling, and Making College Integrated

Episode 127: King-Killers on the Run, or, The Curious Case and Afterlife of Whalley and Goffe

On Tuesday, January 30, 1649, Charles I, King of England, was beheaded. Fifty-nine men had signed his death warrant; and when, after a series of extraordinary events Charles II was restored to the throne, he took revenge against his father’s executioners. Some of them, anticipating this, fled from England by as it were the […]

60 MINSEP 25
Comments
Episode 127: King-Killers on the Run, or, The Curious Case and Afterlife of Whalley and Goffe

Episode 126: Applying to College, or, How to Both Get in and Keep the Family Together

This is another of Historically Thinking’s occasional series on higher education, collectively titled “Higher Ed: A Guide for the Perplexed,” and it could hardly be more timely. There are few things more genuinely perplexing to any outsider, let alone a prospective undergraduate and said undergraduate’s parents, than the college admissions process. If you have any […]

64 MINSEP 18
Comments
Episode 126: Applying to College, or, How to Both Get in and Keep the Family Together

Episode 125: Asking Good Questions, or, How to Talk to People

Samuel Johnson once said “Questioning is not the mode of conversation among gentlemen. It is assuming a superiority, and it is particularly wrong to question a man concerning himself. There may be parts of his former life which he may not wish to be made known to other persons, or even brought to his own […]

59 MINSEP 11
Comments
Episode 125: Asking Good Questions, or, How to Talk to People

Latest Episodes

Episode 134: Inventing Disaster, or, the Creation of a Culture of Calamity

Cultures give us guardrails for behavior, beyond which we can only pass with difficulty. They also give us what to say in a difficult situation, a script that helps us to get the words out, even gives us a template for how to behave. Sometimes these guardrails shift, and the scripts and templates are rewritten. […]

76 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Episode 134: Inventing Disaster, or, the Creation of a Culture of Calamity

Episode 133: Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers, or, Rabies in the City

Hello, in antebellum and late 19th century New York City, nothing could clear a street faster than the cry of “mad dog!” Rabies was perhaps the most feared disease of the era; and because animals and humans lived in such close proximity, even as New York was growing into a city of millions, […]

60 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 133: Mad Dogs and Other New Yorkers, or, Rabies in the City

Episode 132: Armies of Deliverance, or, a New Interpretation of the American Civil War

“Of all the ongoing debates over the Civil War,” writes my guest Elizabeth Varon, “perhaps none has proven so difficult to resolve as the issue of Northern war aims.” Some historians have emphasized, particularly in the last few years, the important point of consensus between many Republicans and Democrats that the Union needed to […]

67 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Episode 132: Armies of Deliverance, or, a New Interpretation of the American Civil War

Episode 131: Red Meat Republic, or, the American Beef Economy of the Late Nineteenth Century

Americans love red meat. More particularly, they love beef. Always have. Archaeology of colonial America shows that British North Americans ate as much beef as they possibly could. Fish? No thank you. Beef? More, please. This British chauvinism for beef (the French, after all, called the English “les rosbifs”) became an American chauvinism. But where […]

49 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Episode 131: Red Meat Republic, or, the American Beef Economy of the Late Nineteenth Century

Episode 130: What’s the Point of College, or, Why There Should Be No Business Majors on Campus

Today’s guest, Johann Neem, has recently written an essay in the Chronicle of Higher Education entitled “Abolish the Business Major”. Here’s a taste: The business major is for students who want a college degree without a college education. The philosopher Tal Brewer haswrittenthat the very notion of business school is an “oxymoron.” The word […]

76 MINOCT 16
Comments
Episode 130: What’s the Point of College, or, Why There Should Be No Business Majors on Campus

Episode 129: Who Fought for the South, or, the Myth of Black Confederates

On January 12, 1865, the Charleston Mercury gave its pronouncement upon plans in the Confederate Congress to enlist Black southerners into the Confederate Army in exchange for their emancipation: By the compact we made with Virginia and the other States of this Confederacy, South Carolina will stand to the bitter end of destruction. By that […]

64 MINOCT 9
Comments
Episode 129: Who Fought for the South, or, the Myth of Black Confederates

Episode 128: Unbundling or Rebundling, and Making College Integrated

Many would-be college reformers, says my guest Chris Gallagher, talk about “unbundling”. By this they mean breaking a college into parts to save on costs and increase efficiency. In reality, Gallagher argues, colleges are already far too unbundled; or, perhaps, dis-integrated. What we need he argues are integrated colleges, ones which are coherently designed so […]

61 MINOCT 2
Comments
Episode 128: Unbundling or Rebundling, and Making College Integrated

Episode 127: King-Killers on the Run, or, The Curious Case and Afterlife of Whalley and Goffe

On Tuesday, January 30, 1649, Charles I, King of England, was beheaded. Fifty-nine men had signed his death warrant; and when, after a series of extraordinary events Charles II was restored to the throne, he took revenge against his father’s executioners. Some of them, anticipating this, fled from England by as it were the […]

60 MINSEP 25
Comments
Episode 127: King-Killers on the Run, or, The Curious Case and Afterlife of Whalley and Goffe

Episode 126: Applying to College, or, How to Both Get in and Keep the Family Together

This is another of Historically Thinking’s occasional series on higher education, collectively titled “Higher Ed: A Guide for the Perplexed,” and it could hardly be more timely. There are few things more genuinely perplexing to any outsider, let alone a prospective undergraduate and said undergraduate’s parents, than the college admissions process. If you have any […]

64 MINSEP 18
Comments
Episode 126: Applying to College, or, How to Both Get in and Keep the Family Together

Episode 125: Asking Good Questions, or, How to Talk to People

Samuel Johnson once said “Questioning is not the mode of conversation among gentlemen. It is assuming a superiority, and it is particularly wrong to question a man concerning himself. There may be parts of his former life which he may not wish to be made known to other persons, or even brought to his own […]

59 MINSEP 11
Comments
Episode 125: Asking Good Questions, or, How to Talk to People
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。