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Library Channel (Audio)

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Library Channel (Audio)
Library Channel (Audio)

Library Channel (Audio)

UCTV

2
Followers
0
Plays
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About Us

The Library Channel serves as a conduit to the UC San Diego Library’s many outreach activities and events, ranging from author talks, faculty lectures, and special events, to concerts, film screenings, and behind-the-scenes interviews with students, librarians, and friends and supporters. Visit: uctv.tv/library-channel

Latest Episodes

Icons of Dissent with Jeremy Prestholdt

Jeremy Prestholdt examines how Che Guevara, Bob Marley, Tupac Shakur, and Osama bin Laden are major "dissenters" who have represented challenges to the world order. Prestholdt explores the appeal of these four figures over five decades, in part revealing two aspects of an increasingly interconnected world: the tension between shared global symbols and their local interpretations, and the intersection of political vision and consumerism. Series: "Library Channel" [Show ID: 35243]

51 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Icons of Dissent with Jeremy Prestholdt

Racism in German and American Cinema of the Twenties: From The Ancient Law to The Jazz Singer with Charles Musser - Holocaust Living History Workshop

Yale University professor and filmmaker Charles Musser explores the historical and contemporary perspectives of race relations in German and American cinema from the 1920s by examining The Ancient Law (1923) and The Jazz Singer (1927). He evaluates how each film addresses anti-Semitism as well as the burning question of the history of blackface as a theatrical convention. Series: "Library Channel" [Show ID: 35016]

74 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Racism in German and American Cinema of the Twenties: From The Ancient Law to The Jazz Singer with Charles Musser - Holocaust Living History Workshop

Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil with Susan Neiman - Holocaust Living History Workshop

As an increasingly polarized America fights over the legacy of racism, Susan Neiman, author of the contemporary philosophical classic Evil in Modern Thought, asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting the evils of the past. In the wake of white nationalist attacks, the ongoing debate over reparations, and the controversy surrounding Confederate monuments and the contested memories they evoke, Susan Neiman’s Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed perspective on how a country can come to terms with its historical wrongdoings. She combines philosophical reflection, personal stories, and interviews with both Americans and Germans who are grappling with the evils of their own national histories. Series: "Writers" [Show ID: 35015]

54 MINOCT 19
Comments
Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil with Susan Neiman - Holocaust Living History Workshop

The Private Art of Theodor Dr. Seuss Geisel - Dinner in the Library 2019

Theodor Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, created paintings and sketches for his own enjoyment. Some of these pieces were on loan from the Geisel estate and exhibited at the UC San Diego Library for the 16th annual Dinner in the Library gala. Join a panel of distinguished speakers as they explore broad themes woven throughout Geisel’s works and its literary and artistic impact. Panelists Mary Beebe, Stuart Collection, Seth Lerer, Professor of Literature, and Rob Sidner, Mingei International Museum, each bring a unique perspective. Series: "Library Channel" [Arts and Music] [Show ID: 35062]

39 MINOCT 1
Comments
The Private Art of Theodor Dr. Seuss Geisel - Dinner in the Library 2019

Blade Runner 2019: Did Life Imitate Art?

The film Blade Runner was set in a dystopian 2019 Los Angeles. A timely gathering is in order. Three futurists sit down for a conversation on the film’s legacy and its relevance to Southern California. The guest speakers are David Brin, Paul Sammon and Mike Davis. They discuss the film’s influence and compare its vision with today’s 2019. Blade Runner initially underperformed in theaters when it was first released in 1982; some praised its thematic complexity and visuals, while others were displeased with its slow-paced narrative and unconventional plot. However, by 1992 it had become a cult classic and was re-released in newly edited versions. Why did it take a decade to find — or create — its audience? Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34684]

47 MINMAY 28
Comments
Blade Runner 2019: Did Life Imitate Art?

When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust - Holocaust Living History Workshop

Despite the explosive growth of Holocaust studies, scholars of Nazi Germany and the Shoah long neglected gender as an analytical category. It wasn’t until 1984 when the essay collection When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany raised awareness of women’s experiences under fascism. It explored women’s double jeopardy as females and as Jews. In this lecture, Marion Kaplan, one of the editors the publication, takes the audience on a historical tour of her research, from the first workshops raising questions to the first publications providing answers. Since then, the gender perspective has provided significant insight into our understanding of Jewish life in Nazi Germany and during the Holocaust. Kaplan concludes her talk with a forward look at new areas of research that highlight women’s and gender studies. Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34018]

44 MINMAY 1
Comments
When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust - Holocaust Living History Workshop

Inventing Genocide - The Contingent Origins of a Concept During World War II - Holocaust Living History Workshop

The suite of international conventions and declarations about genocide, human rights, and refugees after the WWII is known as the “human rights revolution.” It is regarded as humanizing international affairs by implementing the lessons of the Holocaust. In this presentation, Dirk Moses, Professor of Modern History at the University of Sydney, questions this rosy picture by investigating how persecuted peoples have invoked the Holocaust and made analogies with Jews to gain recognition as genocide victims. Such attempts rarely succeed and have been roundly condemned as cheapening the Holocaust memory, but how and why does genocide recognition require groups to draw such comparisons? Does the human rights revolution and image of the Holocaust as the paradigmatic genocide humanize postwar international affairs as commonly supposed? Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34019]

76 MINAPR 25
Comments
Inventing Genocide - The Contingent Origins of a Concept During World War II - Holocaust Living History Workshop

The Perfect Predator: A Scientist's Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly Superbug with Steffanie Strathdee and Thomas Patterson

Delve into the realms of predatory superbugs with infectious disease epidemiologist Steffanie Strathdee and her husband, psychologist Thomas Patterson. This is an incredible story of Strathdee’s fight to save her husband’s life, which led her to rediscover a forgotten treatment for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This unprecedented treatment saved Patterson’s life as well as several others and helped launch the Center for Innovative Phage Applications and Therapeutics (IPATH) at UC San Diego, the first phage therapy center in North America. Series: "Women in Science" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 34410]

58 MINMAR 13
Comments
The Perfect Predator: A Scientist's Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly Superbug with Steffanie Strathdee and Thomas Patterson

Inventing Languages: A Conversation in Language Construction

Constructed languages, or conlangs, are well-known in science fiction and fantasy literature as ways of creating an immersive world-building experience. Join us in learning how linguists design the sound systems and grammars to behind some of our favorite conlangs. With Grant Goodall (Professor and Language Program Director, UC San Diego Linguistics), David J. Peterson (Creator of Dothraki, Game of Thrones), and Paul Frommer (Creator of Na’vi, Avatar). Moderated by Tamara Rhodes (Linguistics Subject Librarian, UC San Diego Library). Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34407]

58 MINFEB 25
Comments
Inventing Languages: A Conversation in Language Construction

Learning in the Age of Google - The Library Channel

What does it means to be literate in the age of Google? At a time when you can search billions of texts in milliseconds, scan over trillions of online images, and look deeply into planet-wide maps, we need to rethink what it means to be literate, and to be a learner. Dan Russell, the Űber Tech Lead for Search Quality and User Happiness at Google, reviews what literacy means today and shows how some very surprising and unexpected skills will turn out to be critical in the years ahead. Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Education] [Show ID: 34063]

58 MIN2018 OCT 30
Comments
Learning in the Age of Google - The Library Channel

Latest Episodes

Icons of Dissent with Jeremy Prestholdt

Jeremy Prestholdt examines how Che Guevara, Bob Marley, Tupac Shakur, and Osama bin Laden are major "dissenters" who have represented challenges to the world order. Prestholdt explores the appeal of these four figures over five decades, in part revealing two aspects of an increasingly interconnected world: the tension between shared global symbols and their local interpretations, and the intersection of political vision and consumerism. Series: "Library Channel" [Show ID: 35243]

51 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Icons of Dissent with Jeremy Prestholdt

Racism in German and American Cinema of the Twenties: From The Ancient Law to The Jazz Singer with Charles Musser - Holocaust Living History Workshop

Yale University professor and filmmaker Charles Musser explores the historical and contemporary perspectives of race relations in German and American cinema from the 1920s by examining The Ancient Law (1923) and The Jazz Singer (1927). He evaluates how each film addresses anti-Semitism as well as the burning question of the history of blackface as a theatrical convention. Series: "Library Channel" [Show ID: 35016]

74 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Racism in German and American Cinema of the Twenties: From The Ancient Law to The Jazz Singer with Charles Musser - Holocaust Living History Workshop

Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil with Susan Neiman - Holocaust Living History Workshop

As an increasingly polarized America fights over the legacy of racism, Susan Neiman, author of the contemporary philosophical classic Evil in Modern Thought, asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting the evils of the past. In the wake of white nationalist attacks, the ongoing debate over reparations, and the controversy surrounding Confederate monuments and the contested memories they evoke, Susan Neiman’s Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed perspective on how a country can come to terms with its historical wrongdoings. She combines philosophical reflection, personal stories, and interviews with both Americans and Germans who are grappling with the evils of their own national histories. Series: "Writers" [Show ID: 35015]

54 MINOCT 19
Comments
Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil with Susan Neiman - Holocaust Living History Workshop

The Private Art of Theodor Dr. Seuss Geisel - Dinner in the Library 2019

Theodor Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, created paintings and sketches for his own enjoyment. Some of these pieces were on loan from the Geisel estate and exhibited at the UC San Diego Library for the 16th annual Dinner in the Library gala. Join a panel of distinguished speakers as they explore broad themes woven throughout Geisel’s works and its literary and artistic impact. Panelists Mary Beebe, Stuart Collection, Seth Lerer, Professor of Literature, and Rob Sidner, Mingei International Museum, each bring a unique perspective. Series: "Library Channel" [Arts and Music] [Show ID: 35062]

39 MINOCT 1
Comments
The Private Art of Theodor Dr. Seuss Geisel - Dinner in the Library 2019

Blade Runner 2019: Did Life Imitate Art?

The film Blade Runner was set in a dystopian 2019 Los Angeles. A timely gathering is in order. Three futurists sit down for a conversation on the film’s legacy and its relevance to Southern California. The guest speakers are David Brin, Paul Sammon and Mike Davis. They discuss the film’s influence and compare its vision with today’s 2019. Blade Runner initially underperformed in theaters when it was first released in 1982; some praised its thematic complexity and visuals, while others were displeased with its slow-paced narrative and unconventional plot. However, by 1992 it had become a cult classic and was re-released in newly edited versions. Why did it take a decade to find — or create — its audience? Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34684]

47 MINMAY 28
Comments
Blade Runner 2019: Did Life Imitate Art?

When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust - Holocaust Living History Workshop

Despite the explosive growth of Holocaust studies, scholars of Nazi Germany and the Shoah long neglected gender as an analytical category. It wasn’t until 1984 when the essay collection When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany raised awareness of women’s experiences under fascism. It explored women’s double jeopardy as females and as Jews. In this lecture, Marion Kaplan, one of the editors the publication, takes the audience on a historical tour of her research, from the first workshops raising questions to the first publications providing answers. Since then, the gender perspective has provided significant insight into our understanding of Jewish life in Nazi Germany and during the Holocaust. Kaplan concludes her talk with a forward look at new areas of research that highlight women’s and gender studies. Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34018]

44 MINMAY 1
Comments
When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust - Holocaust Living History Workshop

Inventing Genocide - The Contingent Origins of a Concept During World War II - Holocaust Living History Workshop

The suite of international conventions and declarations about genocide, human rights, and refugees after the WWII is known as the “human rights revolution.” It is regarded as humanizing international affairs by implementing the lessons of the Holocaust. In this presentation, Dirk Moses, Professor of Modern History at the University of Sydney, questions this rosy picture by investigating how persecuted peoples have invoked the Holocaust and made analogies with Jews to gain recognition as genocide victims. Such attempts rarely succeed and have been roundly condemned as cheapening the Holocaust memory, but how and why does genocide recognition require groups to draw such comparisons? Does the human rights revolution and image of the Holocaust as the paradigmatic genocide humanize postwar international affairs as commonly supposed? Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34019]

76 MINAPR 25
Comments
Inventing Genocide - The Contingent Origins of a Concept During World War II - Holocaust Living History Workshop

The Perfect Predator: A Scientist's Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly Superbug with Steffanie Strathdee and Thomas Patterson

Delve into the realms of predatory superbugs with infectious disease epidemiologist Steffanie Strathdee and her husband, psychologist Thomas Patterson. This is an incredible story of Strathdee’s fight to save her husband’s life, which led her to rediscover a forgotten treatment for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This unprecedented treatment saved Patterson’s life as well as several others and helped launch the Center for Innovative Phage Applications and Therapeutics (IPATH) at UC San Diego, the first phage therapy center in North America. Series: "Women in Science" [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 34410]

58 MINMAR 13
Comments
The Perfect Predator: A Scientist's Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly Superbug with Steffanie Strathdee and Thomas Patterson

Inventing Languages: A Conversation in Language Construction

Constructed languages, or conlangs, are well-known in science fiction and fantasy literature as ways of creating an immersive world-building experience. Join us in learning how linguists design the sound systems and grammars to behind some of our favorite conlangs. With Grant Goodall (Professor and Language Program Director, UC San Diego Linguistics), David J. Peterson (Creator of Dothraki, Game of Thrones), and Paul Frommer (Creator of Na’vi, Avatar). Moderated by Tamara Rhodes (Linguistics Subject Librarian, UC San Diego Library). Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34407]

58 MINFEB 25
Comments
Inventing Languages: A Conversation in Language Construction

Learning in the Age of Google - The Library Channel

What does it means to be literate in the age of Google? At a time when you can search billions of texts in milliseconds, scan over trillions of online images, and look deeply into planet-wide maps, we need to rethink what it means to be literate, and to be a learner. Dan Russell, the Űber Tech Lead for Search Quality and User Happiness at Google, reviews what literacy means today and shows how some very surprising and unexpected skills will turn out to be critical in the years ahead. Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Education] [Show ID: 34063]

58 MIN2018 OCT 30
Comments
Learning in the Age of Google - The Library Channel
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