title

Sexing History

Gillian Frank & Lauren Gutterman

7
Followers
11
Plays
Sexing History
Sexing History

Sexing History

Gillian Frank & Lauren Gutterman

7
Followers
11
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

A podcast about how the history of sexuality shapes our present.

Latest Episodes

Marabel Morgan

Welcome to a bonus track from Sexing History. This track features an extended version of Gillian Frank’s interview with Marabel Morgan from our episode “Touch Me, I’m Yours.” That episode explores how Evangelical women responded to and contributed to the sexualization of American culture in the 1970s. In 1973, Marabel Morgan’s marriage guide, The Total Woman, became a bestseller and a cultural sensation. Millions of people read The Total Woman and thousands signed up for her classes. These classes offered marital advice and included sexual assignments for wives such as asking them to dress up in sexy lingerie, exotic costumes and “to be prepared for sexual intercourse every night for a week.” Historians and cultural commentators frequently refer to Marabel Morgan’s ideas and to her influence. Although she was a fixture on television during the 1970s, recorded interviews with Marabel Morgan are nearly impossible to find. We are therefore delighted to share this extended interview with Marabel Morgan in which she shares her memories about her childhood, her marriage, the changing meaning of her faith, and how writing The Total Woman changed her life. Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman Senior Producer: Saniya Lee Ghanoui Producer and Story Editor: Rebecca Davis Assistant Producers: Chris Babits, Isabel Machado and Mallory Szymanski If you enjoyed this bonus track, please review us on iTunes or Soundcloud and share us on social media. Please support our work and keep new episodes coming by making a small donation to Sexing History.

63 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Marabel Morgan

Against Our Will

In the 1960s and early 1970s many Americans believed that rape was a rare and violent act perpetrated by outsiders and sociopaths. Popular culture taught men that women needed to be tricked or coerced into sex, and psychiatrists accused rape victims of secretly inviting their attacks. Susan Brownmiller’s best-selling book Against Our Will shattered these myths about sexual violence. Informed by the broader feminist anti-rape movement, Against Our Will portrayed rape as a systemic, pervasive, and culturally sanctioned act of power and intimidation.Yet even as Brownmiller provided a framework for naming sexual violence as a mechanism of patriarchy, she also minimized the importance of race and denied the ways that rape accusations have long justified the criminalization and murder of men of color. At a moment when #MeToo has brought about yet another national reckoning with sexual violence and male power, Brownmiller’s book, its legacy, and the contexts that produced the anti-rape movement of the 1970s demand re-examination.Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren GuttermanSenior Producer: Saniya Lee GhanouiProducer and Story Editor: Rebecca DavisAssistant Producers: Chris Babits, Isabel Machado and Mallory SzymanskiIntern: Julian HarbaughThank you to Susan Brownmiller for sharing her story with us.If you enjoyed this episode, please review us on iTunes or Soundcloud and share us on social media.Please support our work and keep new episodes coming by making a small donation to Sexing History.

41 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Against Our Will

Let's Dance!

In the 1960s and 1970s, a belly dancing craze swept the United States. Audiences could enjoy live belly dancing performances in Middle Eastern restaurants and clubs. Viewers could watch belly dancers in hit movies and on popular television shows. At first glance, the history of belly dancing appears to be a story of white middle-class women appropriating Middle Eastern culture and styles to make themselves more exotic. But the story of belly dancing is much more complex: it is a story in which Middle Eastern and American artists and audiences shaped and reshaped artistic expressions, sexual performances and cultural identities.

29 MINOCT 11
Comments
Let's Dance!

Canary

For a short time in the 1970s, Canary Conn was everywhere.She was on television. On the radio. And on bookshelves.Her story, that of a Texas-born recording artist, husband and father who transitioned into a woman whom the media described as “young,” “lithe” and “with flowing blonde hair,” captured national attention.Although some newspaper interviews with Canary have been preserved, there are very few accessible recordings of Canary’s many public performances, or her radio and television interviews. What’s more, the trail of evidence disappears after 1980, when Canary inexplicably left the public spotlight and returned to private life. In this episode we introduce and then play a rare extended audio interview with Canary that she recorded with the magazine Psychology Today in 1977. The interview profiles Canary’s childhood, her transition, her sexuality, and her gender identity.

65 MINJUN 24
Comments
Canary

Sherri

In August of 1962, Sherri Chessen boarded a flight to Sweden in order to get an abortion after she was unable to obtain one in the United States. Sherri had accidentally taken medicine containing thalidomide, a drug that caused children to be born with internal injuries and shortened limbs. Thalidomide also caused women to miscarry, deliver stillborn babies, or have children who died during their infancy. Her decision to terminate this risky pregnancy and her journey abroad attracted international attention from journalists, politicians, and religious leaders. Sherri’s ordeal made public what countless American women experienced when they sought to terminate their pregnancies. Her widely shared story changed the way many Americans thought about abortion laws and even about abortion itself. Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman. Producers: Rebecca Davis, Saniya Lee Ghanoui, Devin McGeehan Muchmore and Jayne Swift. Intern: Alexie Glover. Music: “Plaster Combo,” “B...

49 MINFEB 25
Comments
Sherri

Working the Line: An Interview with Mark S. King

EWelcome to a bonus track from Sexing History. This track features an extended version of Gillian Frank’s interview with Mark S. King from our most recent episode “Sex Over the Phone.” That episode explores how phone sex lines and dial-a-porn transformed the intimacy of phone conversations into a multi-million-dollar sexual enterprise during the 1980s. Mark S. King worked on gay phone sex lines and also owned his own phone sex business. His story helps us better understand the complex relationships between gay history, the history of sex work, the history of the AIDS epidemic and the telecommunications revolution of the 1980s. Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman. Producers: Rebecca Davis, Saniya Lee Ghanoui, Devin McGeehan Muchmore and Jayne Swift. Intern: Alexie Glover. If you enjoyed this bonus track, please review us on iTunes or Soundcloud and share us on social media. Please support our work and keep new episodes coming by making a small donation to Sexing ...

48 MIN2018 NOV 13
Comments
Working the Line: An Interview with Mark S. King

Sex Over the Phone

EFor years, telephone companies had been encouraging customers to “reach out and touch someone.” In the 1980s, phone sex lines and dial-a-porn transformed the intimacy of phone conversations into a multi-million-dollar sexual enterprise. A simple and relatively cheap phone call could connect you with dial-a-porn, a telephone service offering short erotic recordings. Phone sex lines were more expensive, and featured operators, known as fantasy artists, who would act out sexual fantasies for and with you. Over the course of the 1980s, telephones, credit cards and imaginations brought countless people together to co-create sexual fantasies, and experience new forms of sexual gratification.

50 MIN2018 NOV 7
Comments
Sex Over the Phone

Bandstand and the Closet

The hit television show American Bandstand has shaped how we understand the 1950s and early 1960s. For many, American Bandstand still evokes nostalgic images of white youth culture and sexually innocent teenage romance: a world made up of malt shops, juke joints, sock hops and drive-in movie theaters. If we look closer at how Bandstand was staged, and what was hidden from sight or hiding in plain view, we can see how the show's creators erased blackness and queerness from the show itself and from the official story of youth culture.

50 MIN2018 SEP 17
Comments
Bandstand and the Closet

Mama Was a Star

Chances are you’ve never heard of Ruth Wallis, one of the greatest singers, comedians, and performers of sexually suggestive lyrics in the postwar United States. Most of her catalogue remains on vinyl and historians have forgotten her. But from the 1940s until the early 1970s, Ruth Wallis was a bestselling performer and a mainstay at supper clubs and hotels. At a time when it was legally risky for entertainers to sing about sexuality for profit and pleasure, Ruth sold millions of records that used innuendo to playfully hint at a variety of straight and queer sexual pleasures. https://www.sexinghistory.com/episode-8 Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman. Producers: Rebecca Davis, Saniya Lee Ghanoui and Devin McGeehan Muchmore. Intern: Jayne Swift. Special thanks to Alan Pastman, Mitch Douglas and Rusty Warren for sharing their stories with us. Thank you to Jennifer Caplan and Lauren Sklaroff for sharing their historical expertise with us. Thank you to Alan Pastman f...

53 MIN2018 APR 22
Comments
Mama Was a Star

A Church With AIDS

In the 1980s and 1990s, the San Francisco Metropolitan Community Church wrestled with profound questions: What does it mean to minister a gay church when so many in the congregation are dying from AIDS-related complications and grieving the recently dead? How do you have faith during an epidemic? And what does it mean to participate in communion in a community ravaged by a plague? Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman. Producers: Rebecca Davis, Saniya Lee Ghanoui and Devin McGeehan Muchmore. Intern: Jayne Swift Co-created and produced with Lynne Gerber, Siri Colom and Ariana Nedelman from the When We All Get to Heaven podcast. https://www.sexinghistory.com/episode-7

43 MIN2018 MAR 13
Comments
A Church With AIDS

Latest Episodes

Marabel Morgan

Welcome to a bonus track from Sexing History. This track features an extended version of Gillian Frank’s interview with Marabel Morgan from our episode “Touch Me, I’m Yours.” That episode explores how Evangelical women responded to and contributed to the sexualization of American culture in the 1970s. In 1973, Marabel Morgan’s marriage guide, The Total Woman, became a bestseller and a cultural sensation. Millions of people read The Total Woman and thousands signed up for her classes. These classes offered marital advice and included sexual assignments for wives such as asking them to dress up in sexy lingerie, exotic costumes and “to be prepared for sexual intercourse every night for a week.” Historians and cultural commentators frequently refer to Marabel Morgan’s ideas and to her influence. Although she was a fixture on television during the 1970s, recorded interviews with Marabel Morgan are nearly impossible to find. We are therefore delighted to share this extended interview with Marabel Morgan in which she shares her memories about her childhood, her marriage, the changing meaning of her faith, and how writing The Total Woman changed her life. Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman Senior Producer: Saniya Lee Ghanoui Producer and Story Editor: Rebecca Davis Assistant Producers: Chris Babits, Isabel Machado and Mallory Szymanski If you enjoyed this bonus track, please review us on iTunes or Soundcloud and share us on social media. Please support our work and keep new episodes coming by making a small donation to Sexing History.

63 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Marabel Morgan

Against Our Will

In the 1960s and early 1970s many Americans believed that rape was a rare and violent act perpetrated by outsiders and sociopaths. Popular culture taught men that women needed to be tricked or coerced into sex, and psychiatrists accused rape victims of secretly inviting their attacks. Susan Brownmiller’s best-selling book Against Our Will shattered these myths about sexual violence. Informed by the broader feminist anti-rape movement, Against Our Will portrayed rape as a systemic, pervasive, and culturally sanctioned act of power and intimidation.Yet even as Brownmiller provided a framework for naming sexual violence as a mechanism of patriarchy, she also minimized the importance of race and denied the ways that rape accusations have long justified the criminalization and murder of men of color. At a moment when #MeToo has brought about yet another national reckoning with sexual violence and male power, Brownmiller’s book, its legacy, and the contexts that produced the anti-rape movement of the 1970s demand re-examination.Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren GuttermanSenior Producer: Saniya Lee GhanouiProducer and Story Editor: Rebecca DavisAssistant Producers: Chris Babits, Isabel Machado and Mallory SzymanskiIntern: Julian HarbaughThank you to Susan Brownmiller for sharing her story with us.If you enjoyed this episode, please review us on iTunes or Soundcloud and share us on social media.Please support our work and keep new episodes coming by making a small donation to Sexing History.

41 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Against Our Will

Let's Dance!

In the 1960s and 1970s, a belly dancing craze swept the United States. Audiences could enjoy live belly dancing performances in Middle Eastern restaurants and clubs. Viewers could watch belly dancers in hit movies and on popular television shows. At first glance, the history of belly dancing appears to be a story of white middle-class women appropriating Middle Eastern culture and styles to make themselves more exotic. But the story of belly dancing is much more complex: it is a story in which Middle Eastern and American artists and audiences shaped and reshaped artistic expressions, sexual performances and cultural identities.

29 MINOCT 11
Comments
Let's Dance!

Canary

For a short time in the 1970s, Canary Conn was everywhere.She was on television. On the radio. And on bookshelves.Her story, that of a Texas-born recording artist, husband and father who transitioned into a woman whom the media described as “young,” “lithe” and “with flowing blonde hair,” captured national attention.Although some newspaper interviews with Canary have been preserved, there are very few accessible recordings of Canary’s many public performances, or her radio and television interviews. What’s more, the trail of evidence disappears after 1980, when Canary inexplicably left the public spotlight and returned to private life. In this episode we introduce and then play a rare extended audio interview with Canary that she recorded with the magazine Psychology Today in 1977. The interview profiles Canary’s childhood, her transition, her sexuality, and her gender identity.

65 MINJUN 24
Comments
Canary

Sherri

In August of 1962, Sherri Chessen boarded a flight to Sweden in order to get an abortion after she was unable to obtain one in the United States. Sherri had accidentally taken medicine containing thalidomide, a drug that caused children to be born with internal injuries and shortened limbs. Thalidomide also caused women to miscarry, deliver stillborn babies, or have children who died during their infancy. Her decision to terminate this risky pregnancy and her journey abroad attracted international attention from journalists, politicians, and religious leaders. Sherri’s ordeal made public what countless American women experienced when they sought to terminate their pregnancies. Her widely shared story changed the way many Americans thought about abortion laws and even about abortion itself. Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman. Producers: Rebecca Davis, Saniya Lee Ghanoui, Devin McGeehan Muchmore and Jayne Swift. Intern: Alexie Glover. Music: “Plaster Combo,” “B...

49 MINFEB 25
Comments
Sherri

Working the Line: An Interview with Mark S. King

EWelcome to a bonus track from Sexing History. This track features an extended version of Gillian Frank’s interview with Mark S. King from our most recent episode “Sex Over the Phone.” That episode explores how phone sex lines and dial-a-porn transformed the intimacy of phone conversations into a multi-million-dollar sexual enterprise during the 1980s. Mark S. King worked on gay phone sex lines and also owned his own phone sex business. His story helps us better understand the complex relationships between gay history, the history of sex work, the history of the AIDS epidemic and the telecommunications revolution of the 1980s. Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman. Producers: Rebecca Davis, Saniya Lee Ghanoui, Devin McGeehan Muchmore and Jayne Swift. Intern: Alexie Glover. If you enjoyed this bonus track, please review us on iTunes or Soundcloud and share us on social media. Please support our work and keep new episodes coming by making a small donation to Sexing ...

48 MIN2018 NOV 13
Comments
Working the Line: An Interview with Mark S. King

Sex Over the Phone

EFor years, telephone companies had been encouraging customers to “reach out and touch someone.” In the 1980s, phone sex lines and dial-a-porn transformed the intimacy of phone conversations into a multi-million-dollar sexual enterprise. A simple and relatively cheap phone call could connect you with dial-a-porn, a telephone service offering short erotic recordings. Phone sex lines were more expensive, and featured operators, known as fantasy artists, who would act out sexual fantasies for and with you. Over the course of the 1980s, telephones, credit cards and imaginations brought countless people together to co-create sexual fantasies, and experience new forms of sexual gratification.

50 MIN2018 NOV 7
Comments
Sex Over the Phone

Bandstand and the Closet

The hit television show American Bandstand has shaped how we understand the 1950s and early 1960s. For many, American Bandstand still evokes nostalgic images of white youth culture and sexually innocent teenage romance: a world made up of malt shops, juke joints, sock hops and drive-in movie theaters. If we look closer at how Bandstand was staged, and what was hidden from sight or hiding in plain view, we can see how the show's creators erased blackness and queerness from the show itself and from the official story of youth culture.

50 MIN2018 SEP 17
Comments
Bandstand and the Closet

Mama Was a Star

Chances are you’ve never heard of Ruth Wallis, one of the greatest singers, comedians, and performers of sexually suggestive lyrics in the postwar United States. Most of her catalogue remains on vinyl and historians have forgotten her. But from the 1940s until the early 1970s, Ruth Wallis was a bestselling performer and a mainstay at supper clubs and hotels. At a time when it was legally risky for entertainers to sing about sexuality for profit and pleasure, Ruth sold millions of records that used innuendo to playfully hint at a variety of straight and queer sexual pleasures. https://www.sexinghistory.com/episode-8 Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman. Producers: Rebecca Davis, Saniya Lee Ghanoui and Devin McGeehan Muchmore. Intern: Jayne Swift. Special thanks to Alan Pastman, Mitch Douglas and Rusty Warren for sharing their stories with us. Thank you to Jennifer Caplan and Lauren Sklaroff for sharing their historical expertise with us. Thank you to Alan Pastman f...

53 MIN2018 APR 22
Comments
Mama Was a Star

A Church With AIDS

In the 1980s and 1990s, the San Francisco Metropolitan Community Church wrestled with profound questions: What does it mean to minister a gay church when so many in the congregation are dying from AIDS-related complications and grieving the recently dead? How do you have faith during an epidemic? And what does it mean to participate in communion in a community ravaged by a plague? Hosts and Creators: Gillian Frank and Lauren Gutterman. Producers: Rebecca Davis, Saniya Lee Ghanoui and Devin McGeehan Muchmore. Intern: Jayne Swift Co-created and produced with Lynne Gerber, Siri Colom and Ariana Nedelman from the When We All Get to Heaven podcast. https://www.sexinghistory.com/episode-7

43 MIN2018 MAR 13
Comments
A Church With AIDS
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