title

With Good Reason

Virginia Humanities

3
Followers
7
Plays
With Good Reason
With Good Reason

With Good Reason

Virginia Humanities

3
Followers
7
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

Conversations with scholars about a world of ideas

Latest Episodes

The Conflicting Ideals of Jefferson's Architecture

The most important architectural thinker of the young American republic was Thomas Jefferson. He also held captive more than 600 enslaved men, women, and children in his lifetime. Architects Mabel O. Wilson (Columbia University) and Louis Nelson (University of Virginia) discuss Jefferson’s conflicting ideals. Also featured: Erik Neil (Chrysler Museum of Art) takes us through the new Chrysler exhibit that explores the inherent conflict between Jefferson’s pursuit of liberty and democracy and his use of enslaved laborers to construct his monuments. Later in the show: Phillip Herrington (James Madison University) says the white-columned plantation house is one of the most enduring and divisive icons of American architecture. Also: The history of segregation is not just in our architecture, but in other public arts. John Ott (James Madison University) is studying how artists in the early 20th century represented integration in their works, particularly in public murals and sculptures.

51 MIN5 d ago
Comments
The Conflicting Ideals of Jefferson's Architecture

Monsters in the Classroom

What is a Hogzilla Chuck Norris Duck Ape? It’s the creation of a special education class in St. Louis and winner of the 2014 Global Monster Project. Terry Smith (Radford University) explains how creating monsters can help kids learn and grow. Plus: After a viral video raised new concerns about how teachers should be disciplining young children Kevin Sutherland (Virginia Commonwealth University) talks about training teachers to address bad behavior before it happens, not after. And: Rhonda Brock-Servais (Longwood University) says that gothic or horror literature for young kids is more popular than ever. She explores why and shares some of her favorites.

52 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Monsters in the Classroom

Roses in December--Life During Segregation

From all-African American sports teams to pioneering black opera singer Camilla Williams, many people thrived while living parallel lives during segregation.

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Roses in December--Life During Segregation

Eyes on Glass

Blown glass is one of the most beautiful and versatile mediums in art. Today, the art of glass blowing may involve up to date technology, but the essence of working with glass remains an ancient art. Jutta Page is an internationally acclaimed glass curator and the executive director of the Barry Art Museum at Old Dominion University. And: 3D printmaking gets a lot of attention these days as technology advances. But UVA Wise art professor Ray Stratton has been a 3d printmaker his entire career--and it doesn’t involve a fancy printer. Later in the show: Sam Blanchard (Virginia Tech) is a digital artist who uses technology to interweave everyday objects into extended metaphors of experience. He says his relationship between his art and his life flows through stages of inspiration, anticipation, and frustration. Also: Artist Marcia Neblett (Norfolk State University) talks about the physically intense process of woodblock printmaking and how she finds inspiration in fairy tales.

51 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Eyes on Glass

Unexpected Remixes

Imagine if Beyonce had a secret recording of her singing Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical Hamilton, from before they were both famous. It would be epic! Music professor Brooks Kuykendall (University of Mary Washington) has worked with a graduate student to uncover the epic musical crossover of the 19th century--a John Philip Sousa arrangement of Gilbert and Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore. And: Stephen Vitiello (Virginia Commonwealth University) works with some unusual musicians: insects! Along with his collaborator, University of St. Louis biologist Kasey Fowler-Finn, Vitiello makes sound art out of the calls of insects, bringing these tiny songs to big galleries. And: Greg Howard (University of Virginia) remembers his friend Paul Koors, a physician and gifted songwriter, by encouraging others to play the songs that Koors left behind. Later in the show: In 2013, Caroline Shaw’s composition “Partita for 8 Voices” made her the youngest recipient ever of the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Toda...

51 MINSEP 20
Comments
Unexpected Remixes

Why We Believe What We Believe

The best defense against conspiracy theories and fake news is robust journalism--but only if people trust their sources. Mallory Perryman (Virginia Commonwealth University) studies why people distrust their news sources and what we should do to change their minds. And: Why do people believe weird things? That’s what Jason Hart (Christopher Newport University) wants to find out. He delves into the psychology behind ghost encounters, anti-vaccine hoaxes, conspiracy theories, and more. Later in the show: Lieutenant General George Crocker says that when he was first introduced to Rick Atkinson he was told, “If you like the truth, you’ll love Rick.” Over his long career as a journalist and historian, Atkinson has won three Pulitzer Prizes for works that he has written and edited. As part of the Pulitzer Centennial Campfire Initiative, we honor Rick Atkinson’s career, from Vietnam Veterans, WWII, and the Persian Gulf War to DC police shootings and the War in Iraq.

51 MINSEP 13
Comments
Why We Believe What We Believe

Furious Flower- A Celebration of the Greats of African American Poetry

On Sept. 27th and 28th, the most notable poets of our time will gather in the nation’s capital to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Furious Flower Poetry Center, the first academic center devoted to African American poetry in the United States. The founder of Furious Flower, Joanne Gabbin (James Madison University), along with Lauren Alleyne (James Madison University) join us in studio to celebrate this anniversary and hear the voices of Furious Flower poets like Toni Morrison, Maya Angelou, Rita Dove and others who have appeared on With Good Reason. Later in the show: Widely known for his poetry about the Vietnam War, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa’s writing has also explored themes of home, black resilience, and jazz and blues music. Komunyakaa was a guest of honor at a week-long seminar at James Madison University’s Furious Flower Poetry Center, called “Facing It,” titled after his most famous poem. And the recent book, Sargent’s Women tells the fascinatin...

51 MINSEP 6
Comments
Furious Flower- A Celebration of the Greats of African American Poetry

400 Years After 1619

In late August 1619, twenty or more enslaved Africans arrived in Virginia at what’s now called Fort Monroe. They were the first Africans documented in British North America. We speak with Terry Brown, Fort Monroe’s park superintendent about how the park--and America--are commemorating their arrival. We hear from the Tuckers, the descendants of the very first African-American baby, and learn about their work to uncover the stories of their ancestors. Hear more from the Tuckers on our sister show, BackStory. Poet Synnika Lofton (Norfolk State University) reflects on 1619 and shares how he channels his political thoughts into art. When Ana Edwards (Virginia Commonwealth University) first heard the story of Gabriel, an enslaved blacksmith who attempted a rebellion in Richmond, Virginia, she knew she needed to share it. She explains how new efforts to commemorate the lives and rebellions of enslaved Virginians in this Confederate capital are reshaping Richmond today. Richmond poet Josh...

51 MINAUG 30
Comments
400 Years After 1619

Selling the Sights

In the early 19th century, Americans began to journey away from home simply for the sake of traveling. Will Mackintosh(University of Mary Washington) is the author of a new book Selling the Sights: The Invention of the Tourist in American Culture. And: In the past couple of decades, a lot has changed for rural American tourism. Nancy McGehee (Virginia Tech) says that from public artworks to popular foodie trails, small towns and rural areas are finding ways to enrich their communities through tourism. Plus: City-dwellers escape to national and state parks for the beautiful sights and the fresh air. Chris Zajchowski (Old Dominion University) says that, unfortunately, when those tourists travel for clean air, they bring polluted air with them. Later in the show: Within seconds of hearing someone speak, we make judgments about that person and their background, just based on their accent. Linguistics professor Steven Weinberger (George Mason University) explains how and when we develop ...

51 MINAUG 23
Comments
Selling the Sights

Healing Displacement

Dr. Fern Hauck (University of Virginia Medical System) and Farah Ibrahim (CHIP) work to connect refugees and asylum seekers with high-quality healthcare, no matter what language they speak or what trauma they’ve suffered. Al Fuertes (George Mason University) is also dedicated to improving outcomes for refugees and displaced peoples. He draws on his personal experience growing up under martial law to inform his transformative approach to healing. Later in the show: In Border Odyssey Charles Thompson Jr. (Virginia Humanities) tells the story of his journey from a small organic farm in North Carolina to the nearly 2,000 mile long border between the United States and Mexico. And: Gregory Smithers (Virginia Commonwealth University) describes the Cherokee evolution from one community into a people of multiple communities in his book, The Cherokee Diaspora: An Indigenous History of Migration, Resettlement and Identity.

51 MINAUG 14
Comments
Healing Displacement

Latest Episodes

The Conflicting Ideals of Jefferson's Architecture

The most important architectural thinker of the young American republic was Thomas Jefferson. He also held captive more than 600 enslaved men, women, and children in his lifetime. Architects Mabel O. Wilson (Columbia University) and Louis Nelson (University of Virginia) discuss Jefferson’s conflicting ideals. Also featured: Erik Neil (Chrysler Museum of Art) takes us through the new Chrysler exhibit that explores the inherent conflict between Jefferson’s pursuit of liberty and democracy and his use of enslaved laborers to construct his monuments. Later in the show: Phillip Herrington (James Madison University) says the white-columned plantation house is one of the most enduring and divisive icons of American architecture. Also: The history of segregation is not just in our architecture, but in other public arts. John Ott (James Madison University) is studying how artists in the early 20th century represented integration in their works, particularly in public murals and sculptures.

51 MIN5 d ago
Comments
The Conflicting Ideals of Jefferson's Architecture

Monsters in the Classroom

What is a Hogzilla Chuck Norris Duck Ape? It’s the creation of a special education class in St. Louis and winner of the 2014 Global Monster Project. Terry Smith (Radford University) explains how creating monsters can help kids learn and grow. Plus: After a viral video raised new concerns about how teachers should be disciplining young children Kevin Sutherland (Virginia Commonwealth University) talks about training teachers to address bad behavior before it happens, not after. And: Rhonda Brock-Servais (Longwood University) says that gothic or horror literature for young kids is more popular than ever. She explores why and shares some of her favorites.

52 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Monsters in the Classroom

Roses in December--Life During Segregation

From all-African American sports teams to pioneering black opera singer Camilla Williams, many people thrived while living parallel lives during segregation.

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Roses in December--Life During Segregation

Eyes on Glass

Blown glass is one of the most beautiful and versatile mediums in art. Today, the art of glass blowing may involve up to date technology, but the essence of working with glass remains an ancient art. Jutta Page is an internationally acclaimed glass curator and the executive director of the Barry Art Museum at Old Dominion University. And: 3D printmaking gets a lot of attention these days as technology advances. But UVA Wise art professor Ray Stratton has been a 3d printmaker his entire career--and it doesn’t involve a fancy printer. Later in the show: Sam Blanchard (Virginia Tech) is a digital artist who uses technology to interweave everyday objects into extended metaphors of experience. He says his relationship between his art and his life flows through stages of inspiration, anticipation, and frustration. Also: Artist Marcia Neblett (Norfolk State University) talks about the physically intense process of woodblock printmaking and how she finds inspiration in fairy tales.

51 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Eyes on Glass

Unexpected Remixes

Imagine if Beyonce had a secret recording of her singing Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical Hamilton, from before they were both famous. It would be epic! Music professor Brooks Kuykendall (University of Mary Washington) has worked with a graduate student to uncover the epic musical crossover of the 19th century--a John Philip Sousa arrangement of Gilbert and Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore. And: Stephen Vitiello (Virginia Commonwealth University) works with some unusual musicians: insects! Along with his collaborator, University of St. Louis biologist Kasey Fowler-Finn, Vitiello makes sound art out of the calls of insects, bringing these tiny songs to big galleries. And: Greg Howard (University of Virginia) remembers his friend Paul Koors, a physician and gifted songwriter, by encouraging others to play the songs that Koors left behind. Later in the show: In 2013, Caroline Shaw’s composition “Partita for 8 Voices” made her the youngest recipient ever of the Pulitzer Prize for Music. Toda...

51 MINSEP 20
Comments
Unexpected Remixes

Why We Believe What We Believe

The best defense against conspiracy theories and fake news is robust journalism--but only if people trust their sources. Mallory Perryman (Virginia Commonwealth University) studies why people distrust their news sources and what we should do to change their minds. And: Why do people believe weird things? That’s what Jason Hart (Christopher Newport University) wants to find out. He delves into the psychology behind ghost encounters, anti-vaccine hoaxes, conspiracy theories, and more. Later in the show: Lieutenant General George Crocker says that when he was first introduced to Rick Atkinson he was told, “If you like the truth, you’ll love Rick.” Over his long career as a journalist and historian, Atkinson has won three Pulitzer Prizes for works that he has written and edited. As part of the Pulitzer Centennial Campfire Initiative, we honor Rick Atkinson’s career, from Vietnam Veterans, WWII, and the Persian Gulf War to DC police shootings and the War in Iraq.

51 MINSEP 13
Comments
Why We Believe What We Believe

Furious Flower- A Celebration of the Greats of African American Poetry

On Sept. 27th and 28th, the most notable poets of our time will gather in the nation’s capital to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Furious Flower Poetry Center, the first academic center devoted to African American poetry in the United States. The founder of Furious Flower, Joanne Gabbin (James Madison University), along with Lauren Alleyne (James Madison University) join us in studio to celebrate this anniversary and hear the voices of Furious Flower poets like Toni Morrison, Maya Angelou, Rita Dove and others who have appeared on With Good Reason. Later in the show: Widely known for his poetry about the Vietnam War, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa’s writing has also explored themes of home, black resilience, and jazz and blues music. Komunyakaa was a guest of honor at a week-long seminar at James Madison University’s Furious Flower Poetry Center, called “Facing It,” titled after his most famous poem. And the recent book, Sargent’s Women tells the fascinatin...

51 MINSEP 6
Comments
Furious Flower- A Celebration of the Greats of African American Poetry

400 Years After 1619

In late August 1619, twenty or more enslaved Africans arrived in Virginia at what’s now called Fort Monroe. They were the first Africans documented in British North America. We speak with Terry Brown, Fort Monroe’s park superintendent about how the park--and America--are commemorating their arrival. We hear from the Tuckers, the descendants of the very first African-American baby, and learn about their work to uncover the stories of their ancestors. Hear more from the Tuckers on our sister show, BackStory. Poet Synnika Lofton (Norfolk State University) reflects on 1619 and shares how he channels his political thoughts into art. When Ana Edwards (Virginia Commonwealth University) first heard the story of Gabriel, an enslaved blacksmith who attempted a rebellion in Richmond, Virginia, she knew she needed to share it. She explains how new efforts to commemorate the lives and rebellions of enslaved Virginians in this Confederate capital are reshaping Richmond today. Richmond poet Josh...

51 MINAUG 30
Comments
400 Years After 1619

Selling the Sights

In the early 19th century, Americans began to journey away from home simply for the sake of traveling. Will Mackintosh(University of Mary Washington) is the author of a new book Selling the Sights: The Invention of the Tourist in American Culture. And: In the past couple of decades, a lot has changed for rural American tourism. Nancy McGehee (Virginia Tech) says that from public artworks to popular foodie trails, small towns and rural areas are finding ways to enrich their communities through tourism. Plus: City-dwellers escape to national and state parks for the beautiful sights and the fresh air. Chris Zajchowski (Old Dominion University) says that, unfortunately, when those tourists travel for clean air, they bring polluted air with them. Later in the show: Within seconds of hearing someone speak, we make judgments about that person and their background, just based on their accent. Linguistics professor Steven Weinberger (George Mason University) explains how and when we develop ...

51 MINAUG 23
Comments
Selling the Sights

Healing Displacement

Dr. Fern Hauck (University of Virginia Medical System) and Farah Ibrahim (CHIP) work to connect refugees and asylum seekers with high-quality healthcare, no matter what language they speak or what trauma they’ve suffered. Al Fuertes (George Mason University) is also dedicated to improving outcomes for refugees and displaced peoples. He draws on his personal experience growing up under martial law to inform his transformative approach to healing. Later in the show: In Border Odyssey Charles Thompson Jr. (Virginia Humanities) tells the story of his journey from a small organic farm in North Carolina to the nearly 2,000 mile long border between the United States and Mexico. And: Gregory Smithers (Virginia Commonwealth University) describes the Cherokee evolution from one community into a people of multiple communities in his book, The Cherokee Diaspora: An Indigenous History of Migration, Resettlement and Identity.

51 MINAUG 14
Comments
Healing Displacement