title

Working History

Working History

3
Followers
7
Plays
Working History
Working History

Working History

Working History

3
Followers
7
Plays
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About Us

Working History spotlights the work of leading labor historians, activists, and practitioners focusing especially on the U.S. and global Souths, to inform public debate and dialogue about current labor, economic, and political issues with the benefit of historical context.

Latest Episodes

Making the Woman Worker

Eileen Boris discusses her new book MAKING THE WOMAN WORKER: PRECARIOUS LABOR AND THE FIGHT FOR GLOBAL STANDARDS, the history of the ILO's labor protections for women, domestic and home workers in the Global North and Global South, and ongoing fights to recognize precarious labor from the care economy to the gig economy.

41 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Making the Woman Worker

Race, Slavery, and Psychiatry

Dr. Wendy Gonaver discusses her book, "The Peculiar Institution and the Making of Modern Psychiatry, 1840-1880," the Eastern Lunatic Asylum in Virginia, and the roles that race, the institution of slavery, and slave labor played in the development of psychiatric diagnosis and care through the nineteenth century and beyond.

53 MINSEP 12
Comments
Race, Slavery, and Psychiatry

Reconciling a Slaveholding Past

Jody Allen, Assistant Professor of History at the College of William and Mary and Director of The Lemon Project: A Journey of Reconciliation, discusses William and Mary's slaveholding past and the genesis, research, and ongoing community outreach of The Lemon Project.

33 MINJUL 31
Comments
Reconciling a Slaveholding Past

Beef: Exploitation, Innovation, and How Meat Changed America

Joshua Specht discusses his new book, RED MEAT REPUBLIC, and how the history of beef production tells the story of broad changes in the American economy, society and political landscape during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

36 MINJUN 25
Comments
Beef: Exploitation, Innovation, and How Meat Changed America

Appalachia: A Regional Reckoning

Anthony Harkins (Western Kentucky University) and Meredith McCarroll (Bowdin College) discuss their edited volume, APPALACHIAN RECKONING: A REGION RESPONDS TO HILLBILLY ELEGY, the complexities of the region known as Appalachia, and challenging popular stereotypes of the region and the people who live there.

34 MINMAY 23
Comments
Appalachia: A Regional Reckoning

"You Can't Eat Coal": Women's Social Justice Activism in Appalachia

Jessica Wilkerson, Assistant Professor of History and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi, discusses her book, "To Live Here You Have to Fight," and the recent history of feminist social justice activism in Appalachia.

35 MINMAR 14
Comments
"You Can't Eat Coal": Women's Social Justice Activism in Appalachia

Novelist Wiley Cash on “The Last Ballad” and the Loray Mill Strike

Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author Wiley Cash discusses his novel, "The Last Ballad," writing fiction inspired by the South, and exploring the complexities of southern class, race, and gender relations against the backdrop of the 1929 Loray Mill strike.

30 MINFEB 15
Comments
Novelist Wiley Cash on “The Last Ballad” and the Loray Mill Strike

Reconsidering Southern Labor History

Matthew Hild and Keri Leigh Merritt discuss their new edited volume, Reconsidering Southern Labor History, the nexus of race, class and power in the history of labor in the South, and how a new generation of southern labor scholars are changing our understanding of labor's past, present and future in the region.

22 MIN2018 DEC 19
Comments
Reconsidering Southern Labor History

Slavery and Memory

Blain Roberts and Ethan J. Kytle, Professors of History at California State University—Fresno, discuss their co-authored book, Denmark Vesey’s Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy, competing narratives about slavery in the South, and the fraught history of race, memory and memorialization in the region.

46 MIN2018 NOV 28
Comments
Slavery and Memory

Revisioning the American Past though African American and Latinx History

Paul Ortiz, Associate Professor and Director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida, discusses his most recent book, An African American and Latinx History of the United States, the myth of American exceptionalism, and globalizing America's past.

24 MIN2018 OCT 10
Comments
Revisioning the American Past though African American and Latinx History

Latest Episodes

Making the Woman Worker

Eileen Boris discusses her new book MAKING THE WOMAN WORKER: PRECARIOUS LABOR AND THE FIGHT FOR GLOBAL STANDARDS, the history of the ILO's labor protections for women, domestic and home workers in the Global North and Global South, and ongoing fights to recognize precarious labor from the care economy to the gig economy.

41 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Making the Woman Worker

Race, Slavery, and Psychiatry

Dr. Wendy Gonaver discusses her book, "The Peculiar Institution and the Making of Modern Psychiatry, 1840-1880," the Eastern Lunatic Asylum in Virginia, and the roles that race, the institution of slavery, and slave labor played in the development of psychiatric diagnosis and care through the nineteenth century and beyond.

53 MINSEP 12
Comments
Race, Slavery, and Psychiatry

Reconciling a Slaveholding Past

Jody Allen, Assistant Professor of History at the College of William and Mary and Director of The Lemon Project: A Journey of Reconciliation, discusses William and Mary's slaveholding past and the genesis, research, and ongoing community outreach of The Lemon Project.

33 MINJUL 31
Comments
Reconciling a Slaveholding Past

Beef: Exploitation, Innovation, and How Meat Changed America

Joshua Specht discusses his new book, RED MEAT REPUBLIC, and how the history of beef production tells the story of broad changes in the American economy, society and political landscape during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

36 MINJUN 25
Comments
Beef: Exploitation, Innovation, and How Meat Changed America

Appalachia: A Regional Reckoning

Anthony Harkins (Western Kentucky University) and Meredith McCarroll (Bowdin College) discuss their edited volume, APPALACHIAN RECKONING: A REGION RESPONDS TO HILLBILLY ELEGY, the complexities of the region known as Appalachia, and challenging popular stereotypes of the region and the people who live there.

34 MINMAY 23
Comments
Appalachia: A Regional Reckoning

"You Can't Eat Coal": Women's Social Justice Activism in Appalachia

Jessica Wilkerson, Assistant Professor of History and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi, discusses her book, "To Live Here You Have to Fight," and the recent history of feminist social justice activism in Appalachia.

35 MINMAR 14
Comments
"You Can't Eat Coal": Women's Social Justice Activism in Appalachia

Novelist Wiley Cash on “The Last Ballad” and the Loray Mill Strike

Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author Wiley Cash discusses his novel, "The Last Ballad," writing fiction inspired by the South, and exploring the complexities of southern class, race, and gender relations against the backdrop of the 1929 Loray Mill strike.

30 MINFEB 15
Comments
Novelist Wiley Cash on “The Last Ballad” and the Loray Mill Strike

Reconsidering Southern Labor History

Matthew Hild and Keri Leigh Merritt discuss their new edited volume, Reconsidering Southern Labor History, the nexus of race, class and power in the history of labor in the South, and how a new generation of southern labor scholars are changing our understanding of labor's past, present and future in the region.

22 MIN2018 DEC 19
Comments
Reconsidering Southern Labor History

Slavery and Memory

Blain Roberts and Ethan J. Kytle, Professors of History at California State University—Fresno, discuss their co-authored book, Denmark Vesey’s Garden: Slavery and Memory in the Cradle of the Confederacy, competing narratives about slavery in the South, and the fraught history of race, memory and memorialization in the region.

46 MIN2018 NOV 28
Comments
Slavery and Memory

Revisioning the American Past though African American and Latinx History

Paul Ortiz, Associate Professor and Director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida, discusses his most recent book, An African American and Latinx History of the United States, the myth of American exceptionalism, and globalizing America's past.

24 MIN2018 OCT 10
Comments
Revisioning the American Past though African American and Latinx History
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