title

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

Liz Covart

189
Followers
832
Plays
Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History
Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

Liz Covart

189
Followers
832
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

This is a show about early American history. Awarded Best History Podcast by the Academy of Podcasters in 2017, it’s for people who love history and for those who want to know more about the historical people and events that have impacted and shaped our present-day world. Each episode features conversations with professional historians who help shed light on important people and events in early American history. It is produced by the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture.

Latest Episodes

Origins of the Bill of Rights (Doing History 4)

How and why did Congress draft the First Ten Amendments to the Constitution? In this second episode of our 4th Doing History series, we’re investigating how and why Congress drafted the First Ten Amendments to the Constitution. Our guide for this investigation is Kenneth Bowling, a member of the First Federal Congress Project and a co-editor of A Documentary History of the First Federal Congress.

61 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Origins of the Bill of Rights (Doing History 4)

The Bill of Rights & How Legal Historians Work (Doing History 4)

Law is all around us. And the basis of American Law comes not only from our early American past, but from our founding documents. In this episode we go inside the United States National Archives to investigate the Constitution and Bill of Rights. During our visit we’ll speak with Jessie Kratz, First Historian of the National Archives, and Mary Sarah Bilder, the Founders Professor of Law at Boston College, to better understand our founding documents and the laws they established.

71 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The Bill of Rights & How Legal Historians Work (Doing History 4)

Jane Calvert, John Dickinson: Life, Religion, and Politics

John Dickinson was one of the two delegates who absented himself from the vote for independence. Later, he would refuse to sign the Declaration of Independence. But why? Jane Calvert, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and the Director/Editor of The John Dickinson Writings Project, joins us to explore the life, religion, and political views of John Dickinson.

60 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Jane Calvert, John Dickinson: Life, Religion, and Politics

Catherine O'Donnell, Elizabeth Seton: An Early American Life

What was it like to live as a woman of faith in early republic America? What was it like to live as a Catholic in the early United States? Catherine O’Donnell, an Associate Professor of History at Arizona State University and author ofElizabeth Seton: American Saint,helps us investigate answers to these questions by taking us through the life of the United States’ first saint: Elizabeth Ann Seton.

52 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Catherine O'Donnell, Elizabeth Seton: An Early American Life

Christian Koot, Mapping Empire in the Chesapeake

How are empires made and who makes them? What role do maps play in making empires? Christian Koot is the author of A Biography of a Map in Motion: Augustine Herrman’s Chesapeake. Christian has researched and written two books about the seventeenth-century Anglo-Dutch World to better understand empires and how they are made. Today, he joins us to take us through his research and to share what one specific map, Augustine Herrman’s 1673 map Virginia and Maryland, reveals about empire and empire making.

61 MINSEP 17
Comments
Christian Koot, Mapping Empire in the Chesapeake

Martha S. Jones, Birthright Citizenship

Who gets to be a citizen of the United States? How does the United States define who belongs to the nation? Early Americans asked and grappled with these questions during the earliest days of the early republic. Using details from her book, Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America, Martha S. Jones joins us to investigate how early Americans thought about citizenship and how they defined who could and couldn’t belong to the United States.

58 MINSEP 10
Comments
Martha S. Jones, Birthright Citizenship

Jeffrey Sklansky, The Money Question in Early America

We talk a lot about money. But where did the idea of money come from? Did early Americans think about money a lot too? Jeffrey Sklansky is a Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the author of Sovereign of the Market: The Money Question in Early America. Jeff is an expert in the intellectual and social history of capitalism in early America and he’s agreed to lead us on an investigation of the world of money in early America.

53 MINSEP 3
Comments
Jeffrey Sklansky, The Money Question in Early America

Susan Clair Imbarrato, Life and Revolution in Boston and Grenada

What can a family history tell us about revolutionary and early republic America? What can the letters of a wife and mother tell us about life in the Caribbean during the Age of Revolutions? These are questions Susan Clair Imbarrato, a Professor of English at Minnesota State University Moorhead, set out to answer as she explored an amazing trove of letters to and from a woman named Sarah Gray Cary.

45 MINAUG 27
Comments
Susan Clair Imbarrato, Life and Revolution in Boston and Grenada

The Highland Soldier in North America

Much of early American history comprises stories of empire and how different Native, European, and Euro-American nations vied for control of territory, resources, and people. Matthew P. Dziennik presents us with one of these imperial stories. Specifically, we investigate the world of the 18th-century Scottish Highlands and how the 12,000 soldiers the Highlands sent to North America shaped the course of the British Empire during Seven Years’ War and the American Revolution.

60 MINAUG 20
Comments
The Highland Soldier in North America

Frontiers of Science

What did early Americans think about science? And how did they pursue and develop their knowledge of it? Cameron Strang, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Nevada, Reno and author of Frontiers of Science: Imperialism and Natural Knowledge in the Gulf South Borderlands, 1500-1850, joins us to investigate the early American world of science and how early Americans developed their scientific knowledge.

53 MINAUG 13
Comments
Frontiers of Science

Latest Episodes

Origins of the Bill of Rights (Doing History 4)

How and why did Congress draft the First Ten Amendments to the Constitution? In this second episode of our 4th Doing History series, we’re investigating how and why Congress drafted the First Ten Amendments to the Constitution. Our guide for this investigation is Kenneth Bowling, a member of the First Federal Congress Project and a co-editor of A Documentary History of the First Federal Congress.

61 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Origins of the Bill of Rights (Doing History 4)

The Bill of Rights & How Legal Historians Work (Doing History 4)

Law is all around us. And the basis of American Law comes not only from our early American past, but from our founding documents. In this episode we go inside the United States National Archives to investigate the Constitution and Bill of Rights. During our visit we’ll speak with Jessie Kratz, First Historian of the National Archives, and Mary Sarah Bilder, the Founders Professor of Law at Boston College, to better understand our founding documents and the laws they established.

71 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The Bill of Rights & How Legal Historians Work (Doing History 4)

Jane Calvert, John Dickinson: Life, Religion, and Politics

John Dickinson was one of the two delegates who absented himself from the vote for independence. Later, he would refuse to sign the Declaration of Independence. But why? Jane Calvert, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Kentucky and the Director/Editor of The John Dickinson Writings Project, joins us to explore the life, religion, and political views of John Dickinson.

60 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Jane Calvert, John Dickinson: Life, Religion, and Politics

Catherine O'Donnell, Elizabeth Seton: An Early American Life

What was it like to live as a woman of faith in early republic America? What was it like to live as a Catholic in the early United States? Catherine O’Donnell, an Associate Professor of History at Arizona State University and author ofElizabeth Seton: American Saint,helps us investigate answers to these questions by taking us through the life of the United States’ first saint: Elizabeth Ann Seton.

52 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Catherine O'Donnell, Elizabeth Seton: An Early American Life

Christian Koot, Mapping Empire in the Chesapeake

How are empires made and who makes them? What role do maps play in making empires? Christian Koot is the author of A Biography of a Map in Motion: Augustine Herrman’s Chesapeake. Christian has researched and written two books about the seventeenth-century Anglo-Dutch World to better understand empires and how they are made. Today, he joins us to take us through his research and to share what one specific map, Augustine Herrman’s 1673 map Virginia and Maryland, reveals about empire and empire making.

61 MINSEP 17
Comments
Christian Koot, Mapping Empire in the Chesapeake

Martha S. Jones, Birthright Citizenship

Who gets to be a citizen of the United States? How does the United States define who belongs to the nation? Early Americans asked and grappled with these questions during the earliest days of the early republic. Using details from her book, Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America, Martha S. Jones joins us to investigate how early Americans thought about citizenship and how they defined who could and couldn’t belong to the United States.

58 MINSEP 10
Comments
Martha S. Jones, Birthright Citizenship

Jeffrey Sklansky, The Money Question in Early America

We talk a lot about money. But where did the idea of money come from? Did early Americans think about money a lot too? Jeffrey Sklansky is a Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the author of Sovereign of the Market: The Money Question in Early America. Jeff is an expert in the intellectual and social history of capitalism in early America and he’s agreed to lead us on an investigation of the world of money in early America.

53 MINSEP 3
Comments
Jeffrey Sklansky, The Money Question in Early America

Susan Clair Imbarrato, Life and Revolution in Boston and Grenada

What can a family history tell us about revolutionary and early republic America? What can the letters of a wife and mother tell us about life in the Caribbean during the Age of Revolutions? These are questions Susan Clair Imbarrato, a Professor of English at Minnesota State University Moorhead, set out to answer as she explored an amazing trove of letters to and from a woman named Sarah Gray Cary.

45 MINAUG 27
Comments
Susan Clair Imbarrato, Life and Revolution in Boston and Grenada

The Highland Soldier in North America

Much of early American history comprises stories of empire and how different Native, European, and Euro-American nations vied for control of territory, resources, and people. Matthew P. Dziennik presents us with one of these imperial stories. Specifically, we investigate the world of the 18th-century Scottish Highlands and how the 12,000 soldiers the Highlands sent to North America shaped the course of the British Empire during Seven Years’ War and the American Revolution.

60 MINAUG 20
Comments
The Highland Soldier in North America

Frontiers of Science

What did early Americans think about science? And how did they pursue and develop their knowledge of it? Cameron Strang, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Nevada, Reno and author of Frontiers of Science: Imperialism and Natural Knowledge in the Gulf South Borderlands, 1500-1850, joins us to investigate the early American world of science and how early Americans developed their scientific knowledge.

53 MINAUG 13
Comments
Frontiers of Science