title

HerMoney with Jean Chatzky

Jean Chatzky Her Money

51
Followers
279
Plays
HerMoney with Jean Chatzky

HerMoney with Jean Chatzky

Jean Chatzky Her Money

51
Followers
279
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Anyone who tells you women don’t need financial advice specifically for them is wrong. Women, whether they’re the caretakers, the breadwinners, or both, face a unique set of financial challenges. That’s where Her Money comes in. In her frank, often funny, but always compassionate way, Jean Chatzky takes every audience of women through the steps they need to take today to live comfortably (and worry-free) tomorrow, offering the latest research, expert tips and personal advice.

Latest Episodes

How To Successfully Take A Career Break

While care-taking for those we love most can be a beautiful, wouldn’t-have-it-any-other-way experience, we often pay a substantial price. Our time out of the workforce reduces our earning power by an average of 18%, and that number goes up to 37% when our breaks last three years or longer. While those numbers are sobering, they don’t change the realities of life. According to the Harvard Business Review, 43% of women with children leave their careers or take a career break, and 24% of women duck out of the workforce at some point to care for an aging parent. In other words, sometimes we have to take a step back, or step out, but there are ways to do it that can lessen the blow to our careers, according to Stacey Delo and Jennifer Gefsky, co-authors of “Your Turn: Careers, Kids and Comebacks — A Working Mother’s Guide. Together, they run Apres, a digital career platform for women who are returning to the workforce, or who may be pivoting within the workforce. Jean, Stacey and Jennifer dive into a discussion around what it means to step out of the workforce completely, transition to part-time, or simply ask for more flexibility in your schedule. The trio break down the cost of stepping out, how to weigh the expense of daycare against your salary, and how to determine what you might be losing out on in terms of salary and retirement savings if you do take a break. Stacey and Jennifer break down some of their favorite strategies for returning to the workforce, and how to move past the guilt that may go along with decisions to either stay in a job or leave it. They also discuss the disturbing trend of women rejecting promotions for fear of what it may mean for their home life, and what we can all do to change that conversation. We also discuss what you can say to prospective employers when you’re ready to get back to work, and how to tell your “gap story.” Hint: Explain it quickly and concisely, because employers just want to know that you’re ready, and that you’ll be a committed employee. Then we explore how to maintain your network while you’re out of the workforce so that when you’re ready to ignite your job search, you won’t feel out of touch. Lastly, in mailbag, Jean answers a question from a listener wondering if she should be paying her financial advisor $3,000 a year to manage her IRA. She also tackles a question about HSA contributions and income level, and reviews some of the best investment options for Gen-Y. In Thrive, we look at the trend of companies enabling employees to save for retirement at the same time they’re paying down student loans.

35 MIN1 w ago
Comments
How To Successfully Take A Career Break

Selling A Home, Moving, Renovations, Downsizing And More

If you're looking to move, sell a home, buy a home, renovate, downsize or even rent, then this episode is for you. We're tackling all of the above, and diving into the emotional ties we all have to the four walls that surround us, and to the possessions we have inside them. Why do we make decisions with our hearts that should be made by the financial part of our brains? To answer that question, Jean is joined by Caroline Carter, founder and CEO of Done in a Day, a Washington, D.C. based home transition and move management company. Caroline is also the author of the book "Smart Moves: How To Save Time And Money While Transitioning Your Home And Life." Caroline was inspired to start her career when she recognized her own passion for "creating organization out of chaos." Moving is one of the most stressful life events we go through, and every year approximately 40 million Americans move. Caroline dives into how we can all bring the stress levels down when embarking on a move, and dishe...

36 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Selling A Home, Moving, Renovations, Downsizing And More

How To Be More Productive Than Ever In 2020

Will 2020 be the year you secure that promotion, land a new job, or finally get your side hustle off the ground? Maybe you just want to be better about knocking things off your to-do list each day, or perhaps you're ready to become that ultra-productive, ultra-accomplished version of yourself you've envisioned in the movie montage of your life? Thankfully on this week's episode, Julie Morgenstern is here to tell us all exactly how we can get there. Julie is one of the world's leading experts on organization, productivity and time management, and is the New York Times bestselling author of several books, including 'Organizing From The Inside Out,' 'Time Management From The Inside Out,' and 'Never Check Email In The Morning.' Her books have been turned into a popular executive training program that empowers individuals to ramp up their productivity and get the absolute most out of their hours in the day. Julie says if you've been feeling like you're treading water, you're not alone. M...

37 MIN3 w ago
Comments
How To Be More Productive Than Ever In 2020

Bonus Mailbag: Credit, Credit Cards and Debt

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we’re celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (tomailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around credit, credit cards, and debt. Jean answers a question about how business credit cards can impact your personal credit, and what it means for your credit score when you close a business account.We also dive into a question about adding a child to your credit card as an authorized user to help them build credit. (Note: Not every credit card company reportscredit history of authorized users.) Additionally, Jean guides a listener who is wondering if she should claim bankruptcy, see a credit counselor, get a side gig, or cash out a retirement annuity in order to get back on track. Lastly, we advise a woman who is looking to pay down debt with personal loans, while also working to improve her credit score, and to stay motivated to pay down her debt. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can’t wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

23 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: Credit, Credit Cards and Debt

Bonus Mailbag: College, Education And Student Loans

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we’re celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (tomailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around college, education, and student loans. Listen in as Jean advises a woman who co-signed for her daughter's student loans and is now struggling to repay the debt because her daughter hasn't taken responsibility for the loan. We also hear from a woman who is getting a divorce, and her husband has told her he won't be contributing to their two children's college funds once they turn 18. She's looking for a way to ensure her money grows as quickly as it can, and is debating an ESA (Education Savings Account) for her son who is in college. Jean also guides a listener on how the 529 accounts she has for her nieces might impact their ability to get financial aid, and what to do with those accounts before they head to college.Lastly, Jean tackles a question about the best ways to refinance $180,000 in student loans while still being eligible for income-based repayment plans. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can’t wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: College, Education And Student Loans

Bonus Mailbag: Retirement and Investing

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around saving for retirement and investing for the long-haul.Listen in as Jean advises a woman on how much she really needs to save for retirement... Is $1.7 million per person the right amount, or perhaps 25 times your annual expenses? Jean also shares her thoughts with a woman who's debating where to put an extra $4,000 she has annually to invest for retirement. Jean guides a mother of twins who is saving for retirement in a 401(k) and also considering investing in real estate and putting money into an HSA, in an effort to maximize her money for herself and her girls. Lastly, we tackle the question of investing worries that are rooted in a fear of losing money, and a question about selling stock in order to pay off the mortgage early. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

19 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: Retirement and Investing

Missing Loved Ones This Time Of Year? An Expert Helps Guide Us Through

We all experience loss in our lives, and dealing with grief while also honoring and remembering our loved ones can be incredibly challenging. Particularly around the holidays, those who were closest to us who have passed on are often at the forefront of our minds. This week, Jean sits down with Allison Gilbert, an Emmy-award winning journalist, and the author of "Passed and Present: Keeping Memories of Loved Ones Alive." Her book has been described as a "how-to" manual for remembering our loved ones, and contains 85 practical ways to remember, honor, and celebrate those who have passed. "There is more that we can do than just going to a cemetery or lighting a candle," Allison says, adding that she wanted to find a way to make her parents real for her two children who didn't have their maternal grandparents. "I wanted them to truly understand and value and appreciate all those things that came from the Gilbert family," she says. Allison walks us through how we can all take ownership of ensuring our loved ones' memories live on in perpetuity. She also talks about how we can be an awesome friend and coworker to people who have lost loved ones, when we just aren't sure what to say. (She also includes ideas for special remembrance gifts, which we all need!) Allison also shares why the way we talk about our late loved ones matters. "When I'm speaking to my children, I never say 'my mom' or 'my dad,' I will always say 'your grandmother' and 'your grandfather,' because it orients that relationship to them, and makes it more tangible to what they would have missed," she says. Jean and Allison also talk about all of the baggage, stuff and money that's often associated with death, and the ways that people can best deal with it. (Hint: Nothing has to be done today, tomorrow, or even the next day after a loss... You can have some breathing room and wait six months before you do anything.) In other words, you don't have to wake up and immediately sell the house. Rather, you can wait until the emotions aren't so raw. You can take a breath and then bring in an advisor (a financial advisor, a trusted friend or family member) who is more neutral and who can help you think about next steps and perhaps purging your loved one's goods over time. Allison also breaks down a guide for how to repurpose and donate your loved one's possessions, and how to make giving things away a less guilt-ridden process. She also offers up her thoughts on how to make it easier for our own children and grandchildren to deal with our "stuff" and to remember us after we're gone. Thankfully, the digital world has changed the game when it comes to remembering. It's easier than ever to share stories in a family Google doc, upload and digitize photos, and share memories — it's no longer the responsibility of one family member to be the repository of the entire family history. Then, in Mailbag, Jean advises a woman going through a divorce on whether to keep saving or pay down her debt, since she will likely be splitting assets and liabilities evenly with her husband. She also guides a listener who's considering refinancing her home loan but is unsure if it's worth the time and effort to save half a percentage point, and offers her thoughts on getting a prenup to a woman who's engaged to a man who has a strained relationship with his children. Lastly, in Thrive, Jean dishes on how to retain your sanity and energy levels when pursuing a side gig.

36 MIN2019 DEC 25
Comments
Missing Loved Ones This Time Of Year? An Expert Helps Guide Us Through

Bonus Mailbag: Home Buying and Real Estate

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around real estate and home buying. Jean advises a listener on how to buy a new home when all your money is tied up in your old one, as well as the ins and outs of selling a rental home while keeping some money liquid for a new home purchase. She also advises on whether or not a listener should pay off her mortgage early, or invest the money, and weighs in on whether or not a couple should renovate and sell their home, or stay put. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend some more quality time together in the New Year!

27 MIN2019 DEC 22
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: Home Buying and Real Estate

Bonus Mailbag: Children, Familiesand Finances

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around children and families. Jean offers her thoughts on how women with limited incomes can afford to adopt, and available funding and financing options. We also talk through starting 529 plans for children, and strategies for supporting adult children through grad school without enabling them. And if you've ever wondered how to help your kids save, this episode's for you! Jean offers her thoughts on engaging your children, and how parents can open a brokerage account to help their little ones get excited about investing early on. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend some more quality time together in the New Year!

17 MIN2019 DEC 21
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: Children, Familiesand Finances

How To Earn What You're Worth In 2020

You asked, and we listened! Our HerMoney family consistently requests more content around career advancement, negotiating for increased earnings, and taking a step up at your current company. Today’s HerMoney Podcast guest, Tracy Keogh, dishes on all of the above — and then some. In her role as Chief Human Resources Officer at HP, Tracy has worldwide responsibility for the technology company’s strategic human resources activities, employee communications and social responsibility initiatives. She previously served as the Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Aon Hewitt, and has been teaching female executives how to negotiate — against her — for many years. In this week’s episode, Tracy offers us all a mini-course in some of her favorite tactics, including how to create a term sheet, how to ask for an off-cycle review to get a bump sooner than expected, and how to avoid negotiating against yourself. Oftentimes, women feel like asking for more money is “rude,” or that they might not be liked by others if they’re high earners, but that’s simply not true, Tracy says. The old wisdom of “you don’t get what you don’t ask for” has never been more applicable than where salary is concerned. Before going into any negotiation, do your homework. Find out what's common in your industry by looking online, talking to headhunters, friends, former colleagues, and anyone else you trust. Then, begin crafting your term sheet. Write out everything that has to do with your job, including what your salary is now, what you expect it to be, your desired title, your expected bonus, your desired vacation days, your retirement plan, and what you’d need to be offered in order to seriously consider leaving your current company for a new job. Creating this term sheet — this “exhaustive list,” as Keogh calls it — enables you to have a 360-degree view of your total compensation package. “When you write these things down, you realize the current value of your situation,” she says. Tracy says she’s seen many women make the mistake of negotiating against themselves, and shares some thoughts on how to ensure this doesn’t happen to you. For example, you shouldn’t be the first one to offer up the salary figure you want, and you should always decline to offer your current salary — it’s illegal in many states for prospective employers to ask! She notes that when companies give offers, they almost always leave room for negotiation, and if you feel like an organization is low-balling you and simply won’t pay you what you’re worth, then it’s probably not the kind of company you want to work for. Tracy also discusses the importance of “negotiating from day one,” and how you can lay the groundwork for getting a higher salary without ever outright throwing out dollar figures. (She earned more by simply letting her company know upfront that she was her family’s sole breadwinner.) She also throws out tips for staying safe in a job, including the importance of getting everything in writing. For example, if your boss leaves his or her role, your new one may not agree to any “side arrangements” you had, so always get those in ink so you can continue to enjoy the perks of your role for years to come. Then, in Mailbag, Jean advises a listener on where to get the best returns when you invest and the importance of having a diversified portfolio. She also counsels a woman who is wondering if the periodic credit increases her credit card company offers could possibly damage her credit, and offers advice to a listener struggling to get her husband interested in personal finance and co-managing their household’s money. Lastly, in Thrive, Jean discusses the importance of taking much-needed breaks at work — for a quick phone call, a moment of zen, or a even game of Candy Crush — all while in the bathroom.

38 MIN2019 DEC 18
Comments
How To Earn What You're Worth In 2020

Latest Episodes

How To Successfully Take A Career Break

While care-taking for those we love most can be a beautiful, wouldn’t-have-it-any-other-way experience, we often pay a substantial price. Our time out of the workforce reduces our earning power by an average of 18%, and that number goes up to 37% when our breaks last three years or longer. While those numbers are sobering, they don’t change the realities of life. According to the Harvard Business Review, 43% of women with children leave their careers or take a career break, and 24% of women duck out of the workforce at some point to care for an aging parent. In other words, sometimes we have to take a step back, or step out, but there are ways to do it that can lessen the blow to our careers, according to Stacey Delo and Jennifer Gefsky, co-authors of “Your Turn: Careers, Kids and Comebacks — A Working Mother’s Guide. Together, they run Apres, a digital career platform for women who are returning to the workforce, or who may be pivoting within the workforce. Jean, Stacey and Jennifer dive into a discussion around what it means to step out of the workforce completely, transition to part-time, or simply ask for more flexibility in your schedule. The trio break down the cost of stepping out, how to weigh the expense of daycare against your salary, and how to determine what you might be losing out on in terms of salary and retirement savings if you do take a break. Stacey and Jennifer break down some of their favorite strategies for returning to the workforce, and how to move past the guilt that may go along with decisions to either stay in a job or leave it. They also discuss the disturbing trend of women rejecting promotions for fear of what it may mean for their home life, and what we can all do to change that conversation. We also discuss what you can say to prospective employers when you’re ready to get back to work, and how to tell your “gap story.” Hint: Explain it quickly and concisely, because employers just want to know that you’re ready, and that you’ll be a committed employee. Then we explore how to maintain your network while you’re out of the workforce so that when you’re ready to ignite your job search, you won’t feel out of touch. Lastly, in mailbag, Jean answers a question from a listener wondering if she should be paying her financial advisor $3,000 a year to manage her IRA. She also tackles a question about HSA contributions and income level, and reviews some of the best investment options for Gen-Y. In Thrive, we look at the trend of companies enabling employees to save for retirement at the same time they’re paying down student loans.

35 MIN1 w ago
Comments
How To Successfully Take A Career Break

Selling A Home, Moving, Renovations, Downsizing And More

If you're looking to move, sell a home, buy a home, renovate, downsize or even rent, then this episode is for you. We're tackling all of the above, and diving into the emotional ties we all have to the four walls that surround us, and to the possessions we have inside them. Why do we make decisions with our hearts that should be made by the financial part of our brains? To answer that question, Jean is joined by Caroline Carter, founder and CEO of Done in a Day, a Washington, D.C. based home transition and move management company. Caroline is also the author of the book "Smart Moves: How To Save Time And Money While Transitioning Your Home And Life." Caroline was inspired to start her career when she recognized her own passion for "creating organization out of chaos." Moving is one of the most stressful life events we go through, and every year approximately 40 million Americans move. Caroline dives into how we can all bring the stress levels down when embarking on a move, and dishe...

36 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Selling A Home, Moving, Renovations, Downsizing And More

How To Be More Productive Than Ever In 2020

Will 2020 be the year you secure that promotion, land a new job, or finally get your side hustle off the ground? Maybe you just want to be better about knocking things off your to-do list each day, or perhaps you're ready to become that ultra-productive, ultra-accomplished version of yourself you've envisioned in the movie montage of your life? Thankfully on this week's episode, Julie Morgenstern is here to tell us all exactly how we can get there. Julie is one of the world's leading experts on organization, productivity and time management, and is the New York Times bestselling author of several books, including 'Organizing From The Inside Out,' 'Time Management From The Inside Out,' and 'Never Check Email In The Morning.' Her books have been turned into a popular executive training program that empowers individuals to ramp up their productivity and get the absolute most out of their hours in the day. Julie says if you've been feeling like you're treading water, you're not alone. M...

37 MIN3 w ago
Comments
How To Be More Productive Than Ever In 2020

Bonus Mailbag: Credit, Credit Cards and Debt

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we’re celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (tomailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around credit, credit cards, and debt. Jean answers a question about how business credit cards can impact your personal credit, and what it means for your credit score when you close a business account.We also dive into a question about adding a child to your credit card as an authorized user to help them build credit. (Note: Not every credit card company reportscredit history of authorized users.) Additionally, Jean guides a listener who is wondering if she should claim bankruptcy, see a credit counselor, get a side gig, or cash out a retirement annuity in order to get back on track. Lastly, we advise a woman who is looking to pay down debt with personal loans, while also working to improve her credit score, and to stay motivated to pay down her debt. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can’t wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

23 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: Credit, Credit Cards and Debt

Bonus Mailbag: College, Education And Student Loans

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we’re celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (tomailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around college, education, and student loans. Listen in as Jean advises a woman who co-signed for her daughter's student loans and is now struggling to repay the debt because her daughter hasn't taken responsibility for the loan. We also hear from a woman who is getting a divorce, and her husband has told her he won't be contributing to their two children's college funds once they turn 18. She's looking for a way to ensure her money grows as quickly as it can, and is debating an ESA (Education Savings Account) for her son who is in college. Jean also guides a listener on how the 529 accounts she has for her nieces might impact their ability to get financial aid, and what to do with those accounts before they head to college.Lastly, Jean tackles a question about the best ways to refinance $180,000 in student loans while still being eligible for income-based repayment plans. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can’t wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: College, Education And Student Loans

Bonus Mailbag: Retirement and Investing

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around saving for retirement and investing for the long-haul.Listen in as Jean advises a woman on how much she really needs to save for retirement... Is $1.7 million per person the right amount, or perhaps 25 times your annual expenses? Jean also shares her thoughts with a woman who's debating where to put an extra $4,000 she has annually to invest for retirement. Jean guides a mother of twins who is saving for retirement in a 401(k) and also considering investing in real estate and putting money into an HSA, in an effort to maximize her money for herself and her girls. Lastly, we tackle the question of investing worries that are rooted in a fear of losing money, and a question about selling stock in order to pay off the mortgage early. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend more quality time together in the New Year!

19 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: Retirement and Investing

Missing Loved Ones This Time Of Year? An Expert Helps Guide Us Through

We all experience loss in our lives, and dealing with grief while also honoring and remembering our loved ones can be incredibly challenging. Particularly around the holidays, those who were closest to us who have passed on are often at the forefront of our minds. This week, Jean sits down with Allison Gilbert, an Emmy-award winning journalist, and the author of "Passed and Present: Keeping Memories of Loved Ones Alive." Her book has been described as a "how-to" manual for remembering our loved ones, and contains 85 practical ways to remember, honor, and celebrate those who have passed. "There is more that we can do than just going to a cemetery or lighting a candle," Allison says, adding that she wanted to find a way to make her parents real for her two children who didn't have their maternal grandparents. "I wanted them to truly understand and value and appreciate all those things that came from the Gilbert family," she says. Allison walks us through how we can all take ownership of ensuring our loved ones' memories live on in perpetuity. She also talks about how we can be an awesome friend and coworker to people who have lost loved ones, when we just aren't sure what to say. (She also includes ideas for special remembrance gifts, which we all need!) Allison also shares why the way we talk about our late loved ones matters. "When I'm speaking to my children, I never say 'my mom' or 'my dad,' I will always say 'your grandmother' and 'your grandfather,' because it orients that relationship to them, and makes it more tangible to what they would have missed," she says. Jean and Allison also talk about all of the baggage, stuff and money that's often associated with death, and the ways that people can best deal with it. (Hint: Nothing has to be done today, tomorrow, or even the next day after a loss... You can have some breathing room and wait six months before you do anything.) In other words, you don't have to wake up and immediately sell the house. Rather, you can wait until the emotions aren't so raw. You can take a breath and then bring in an advisor (a financial advisor, a trusted friend or family member) who is more neutral and who can help you think about next steps and perhaps purging your loved one's goods over time. Allison also breaks down a guide for how to repurpose and donate your loved one's possessions, and how to make giving things away a less guilt-ridden process. She also offers up her thoughts on how to make it easier for our own children and grandchildren to deal with our "stuff" and to remember us after we're gone. Thankfully, the digital world has changed the game when it comes to remembering. It's easier than ever to share stories in a family Google doc, upload and digitize photos, and share memories — it's no longer the responsibility of one family member to be the repository of the entire family history. Then, in Mailbag, Jean advises a woman going through a divorce on whether to keep saving or pay down her debt, since she will likely be splitting assets and liabilities evenly with her husband. She also guides a listener who's considering refinancing her home loan but is unsure if it's worth the time and effort to save half a percentage point, and offers her thoughts on getting a prenup to a woman who's engaged to a man who has a strained relationship with his children. Lastly, in Thrive, Jean dishes on how to retain your sanity and energy levels when pursuing a side gig.

36 MIN2019 DEC 25
Comments
Missing Loved Ones This Time Of Year? An Expert Helps Guide Us Through

Bonus Mailbag: Home Buying and Real Estate

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around real estate and home buying. Jean advises a listener on how to buy a new home when all your money is tied up in your old one, as well as the ins and outs of selling a rental home while keeping some money liquid for a new home purchase. She also advises on whether or not a listener should pay off her mortgage early, or invest the money, and weighs in on whether or not a couple should renovate and sell their home, or stay put. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend some more quality time together in the New Year!

27 MIN2019 DEC 22
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: Home Buying and Real Estate

Bonus Mailbag: Children, Familiesand Finances

In honor of a very happy holiday season, we're celebrating with our HerMoney family with five special Mailbag-focused episodes! Our listeners submit THE BEST questions all year long (to mailbag@hermoney.com), and we wanted to get as many as possible answered before 2020 rolls around. In this episode, Jean and Kathryn dive into your questions around children and families. Jean offers her thoughts on how women with limited incomes can afford to adopt, and available funding and financing options. We also talk through starting 529 plans for children, and strategies for supporting adult children through grad school without enabling them. And if you've ever wondered how to help your kids save, this episode's for you! Jean offers her thoughts on engaging your children, and how parents can open a brokerage account to help their little ones get excited about investing early on. From everyone on the HerMoney team, thank you so much for listening to us in 2019. We can't wait to spend some more quality time together in the New Year!

17 MIN2019 DEC 21
Comments
Bonus Mailbag: Children, Familiesand Finances

How To Earn What You're Worth In 2020

You asked, and we listened! Our HerMoney family consistently requests more content around career advancement, negotiating for increased earnings, and taking a step up at your current company. Today’s HerMoney Podcast guest, Tracy Keogh, dishes on all of the above — and then some. In her role as Chief Human Resources Officer at HP, Tracy has worldwide responsibility for the technology company’s strategic human resources activities, employee communications and social responsibility initiatives. She previously served as the Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Aon Hewitt, and has been teaching female executives how to negotiate — against her — for many years. In this week’s episode, Tracy offers us all a mini-course in some of her favorite tactics, including how to create a term sheet, how to ask for an off-cycle review to get a bump sooner than expected, and how to avoid negotiating against yourself. Oftentimes, women feel like asking for more money is “rude,” or that they might not be liked by others if they’re high earners, but that’s simply not true, Tracy says. The old wisdom of “you don’t get what you don’t ask for” has never been more applicable than where salary is concerned. Before going into any negotiation, do your homework. Find out what's common in your industry by looking online, talking to headhunters, friends, former colleagues, and anyone else you trust. Then, begin crafting your term sheet. Write out everything that has to do with your job, including what your salary is now, what you expect it to be, your desired title, your expected bonus, your desired vacation days, your retirement plan, and what you’d need to be offered in order to seriously consider leaving your current company for a new job. Creating this term sheet — this “exhaustive list,” as Keogh calls it — enables you to have a 360-degree view of your total compensation package. “When you write these things down, you realize the current value of your situation,” she says. Tracy says she’s seen many women make the mistake of negotiating against themselves, and shares some thoughts on how to ensure this doesn’t happen to you. For example, you shouldn’t be the first one to offer up the salary figure you want, and you should always decline to offer your current salary — it’s illegal in many states for prospective employers to ask! She notes that when companies give offers, they almost always leave room for negotiation, and if you feel like an organization is low-balling you and simply won’t pay you what you’re worth, then it’s probably not the kind of company you want to work for. Tracy also discusses the importance of “negotiating from day one,” and how you can lay the groundwork for getting a higher salary without ever outright throwing out dollar figures. (She earned more by simply letting her company know upfront that she was her family’s sole breadwinner.) She also throws out tips for staying safe in a job, including the importance of getting everything in writing. For example, if your boss leaves his or her role, your new one may not agree to any “side arrangements” you had, so always get those in ink so you can continue to enjoy the perks of your role for years to come. Then, in Mailbag, Jean advises a listener on where to get the best returns when you invest and the importance of having a diversified portfolio. She also counsels a woman who is wondering if the periodic credit increases her credit card company offers could possibly damage her credit, and offers advice to a listener struggling to get her husband interested in personal finance and co-managing their household’s money. Lastly, in Thrive, Jean discusses the importance of taking much-needed breaks at work — for a quick phone call, a moment of zen, or a even game of Candy Crush — all while in the bathroom.

38 MIN2019 DEC 18
Comments
How To Earn What You're Worth In 2020

More from Jean Chatzky Her Money

Show

Playlists

listen later 2
Chrisavenue1843
Listen
chelebelle43
Drivetime
Carrieheiny40
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。