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Hujjat Podcast

KSIMC of London

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Hujjat Podcast
Hujjat Podcast

Hujjat Podcast

KSIMC of London

0
Followers
2
Plays
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About Us

The Hujjat Podcast is a podcast set up by the KSIMC of London (AKA Hujjat Stanmore) which seeks to bring high-quality Islamic content to a digital audience. We will be posting our weekly Friday Sermons delivered at the centre in Stanmore as well as bespoke content from our resident scholars and community members, including The Breakdown - a podcast with Al Haadi YouthBe sure to subscribe!

Latest Episodes

Ep 3 - Tales of the tenth: Dreams foreshadowing Ashura

How well do we know the characters of Karbala? What were the key drivers behind the actions of the villains of Ashura? How did their main motivations differ from eachother? How did some of the dreams of the Ahlul Bayt foreshadow the events on that fateful day? In our new mini Muharram series, Tales of the Tenth, we go in depth in all of this and much more in a series of short podcasts. We are delighted to be *joined by Father Christopher Clohessy*, author and academic of Shi’i Studies in Rome. Join us as we now shift our focus to the various dreams people had regarding the day of Ashura. In particular, who had these dreams and how how did they foreshadow Karbala? How did they describe the army of Yazid? And how in the end, did it reveal that the tragedy of Karbala was destined to happen? Join Abbas & Mohammed in this episode, where we concentrate on the recollections of Umme Salma, one of the wives of our holy Prophet.

20 MIN4 days ago
Comments
Ep 3 - Tales of the tenth: Dreams foreshadowing Ashura

Ep 2 - Tales of the tenth: The personality of Umar ibn Sa'ad

Join us for an academic examination into the life of the accursed Umar ibn Sa’ad. How well do we know the characters of Karbala? What were the key drivers behind the actions of the villains of Ashura? How did their main motivations differ from eachother? How did some of the dreams of the Ahlul Bayt foreshadow the events on that fateful day? In our new mini Muharram series, Tales of the Tenth, we go in depth in all of this and much more in a series of short podcasts. We are delighted to be joined by Father Christopher Clohessy, author and academic of Shi’i Studies in Rome.

17 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Ep 2 - Tales of the tenth: The personality of Umar ibn Sa'ad

Ep 1 - Tales of the tenth: The personality of Shimr bin Dhil Jawshan

Join us for an academic examination into the life of the accursed Shimr bin Dhil-Jawshan. How well do we know the characters of Karbala? What were the key drivers behind the actions of the villains of Ashura? How did their main motivations differ from eachother? How did some of the dreams of the Ahlul Bayt foreshadow the events on that fateful day? In our new mini Muharram series, Tales of the Tenth, we go in depth in all of this and much more in a series of short podcasts. We are delighted to be joined by Father Christopher Clohessy, author and academic of Shi’i Studies in Rome.

21 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Ep 1 - Tales of the tenth: The personality of Shimr bin Dhil Jawshan

The Breakdown - Ep 8: The Hawza Experience - What is it like to study in an Islamic Seminary?

Is the Hawza still relevant for Western Muslims in 2019? Do we have infrastructure to encourage and support female students? What must one consider when looking at studying in an Islamic seminary? In this eye-opening segment, Ahmed and Abbas are joined by Br. Sadiq Meghjee - a Hawza student in Qom, who answers various pertinent questions on the need for seminaries and the reality of modern day traditional Islamic studies. If you have questions for Sadiq after listening to this segment, or if you have any other topic/guest suggestions, you can reach on on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram - @alhaadiyouth. Hope you enjoy listening!

49 MINAUG 17
Comments
The Breakdown - Ep 8: The Hawza Experience - What is it like to study in an Islamic Seminary?

Friday Sermon: Using the faults in others to help see the faults within you

In this khutba, we propose the principle that when you notice a fault in a person, this should be enough of a lesson for yourself to take note and ensure you do not practise that act yourself. This principle is mentioned in the hadith by Imam Mohammed al-Baqir (a) who stated, "Sufficient is a person’s own defect (in himself) that he tries to pick and look for faults in other people when he himself has those same faults in himself (and does not recognize them." It is often thecase that when a person does a bad act we notice it. It can be anything like how a person reacts to traffic on the road, or whether they keep in touch with their family members, a face they make when asked to do something, how they eat. All of these may beinnocuous acts but they do not go unnoticed by ourselves and infact may often grind or irk us or make us wish they did not act like this. However, it is also the case that more often than not we also have the same or similar trait - but just don't realise it! The Qur'an tells us not to laugh at others nor fault find: "O you who have believed, let not a people ridicule [another] people; perhaps they may be better than them; nor let women ridicule [other] women; perhaps they may be better than them. And do not fault find amongst yourselves" (49:11). The scholars of Akhlaq add the following prescriptions to remedy or navigate this sort of heedlessness.When a person see's an act they dislike, either they truly do perform that act themselves or truly they do not. i) In the case where they do not, they should first thank Allah (swt) for having purified them that they do not commit that act. This is because guidance success is from Allah (swt) in the first place and so He is the prime cause of one's goodness. In sincerelythanking Allah (swt) he would keep you protected from this and improve you even further, as He states, "If you are grateful, I will surely increase you further [in favour]" (Qur'an 14:7). If one is not humble to this, certainly they will soon fall foul and perform that act themselves. ii) In the case where they do perform such an act, it is most likely that Allah (swt) has covered that act such that most people will have never seen it performed. Allah (swt) indeed is the concealer of defects. The books of supplication are replete with lines of du'a that should be recited at this moment. For example: My God, so to Thee belongs praise! How many of my flaws Thou hast covered over without exposing me! How many of my sins Thou hast cloaked without making me notorious! How many faults I have committed, yet Thou didst not tear away from me their covering iii) And alsoIn the case where they do perform such an act, one may entreat Allah (swt) to remove that practise inthemselves for just as you dislike to see it in others, you should dislike it for your own self. Conclusion It is normal to notice and dislike a bad trait or reaction in someone else; this is a sign of a healthy conscious and an awareness of inappropriate behaviours. However, it is just as normal that though we dislike something in others, we may find that same practise in ourselves. This noticing it in others and our own reaction to it should be sufficient as a means of self-improvement. After noticing it in others and in ourown selves, the aware and God-conscious (Muttaqi) person takes himself to account greater than he would take another person to account. He holds himself to a greaterresponsibility for removing that action before expecting another to stop it. In this way he is more focused on his own development than finding faults with another. InshaAllah next week we will build on this principle with another Akhlaqi formula.

25 MINJUL 31
Comments
Friday Sermon: Using the faults in others to help see the faults within you

Friday Sermon: Make your private behaviour better than your public behaviour

In this series of Friday Sermon's, we shall be focused on improving our character and mannerisms. Each week we will pick one Akhlaqi principle and delve into some of its features, the idea being that from one week to the next we make a special and dedicated intention to implement this particular practise. God-willing over the week, this one practise will help us to improve that element of our moral nature, preparing us for the following weeks principle. This of course is based on the noble character of the holy Prophet Muhammad (s) who the holy Qur'an tells us, "Indeed in the Messenger of Allah, you have an excellent model for the one who seeks God, the Day of Judgement and remembers God unceasingly" (33:21). Our first Akhlaqi principle is to make our private behaviour surpass our public behaviour. It is often the case that our public behaviour is better than our private behaviour. This is because when we are in public, we want the best version of ourselves to be seen and so we become very aware of how we act; when in our private circles however, we revert to default behaviours or are less concerned with how people see us. This manifests itself in many ways: In public, I may never swear but in private I may. In private I will watch things I would never watch in public. In public the length of my Salaat is very long but in private it is extremely quick or with the TV still on. In public I will smile and talk nicely to people at the Mosque but when I return home, I am grumpy and would never spend time talking to my family and so on. This is problematic because of the hypocrisy it builds within us and normalises this dichotomy, entrenching its practises further. The narrations specify that when our inward state is corrupted so too will our outward behaviours be, as we will not always be able to control ourselves and these inward states will manifest themselves. But similarly when our outward behaviours are problematic such as acting differently, it will corrupt our inward realities. For example one narration states, "When the outward gets corrupted, the inward also gets corrupted."

24 MINJUL 30
Comments
Friday Sermon: Make your private behaviour better than your public behaviour

A Hajj Veteran of 30 Years! - Interview with Ahmed Dungersi

Join Sheikh Jaffer Ladak and Ahmed Dungersi as they discuss his 30 years as chairman of the European Hajj Mission, how has he seen Mecca change and what happened when his group of 150 people were arrested?

46 MINJUL 17
Comments
A Hajj Veteran of 30 Years! - Interview with Ahmed Dungersi

The Breakdown - Ep 7: Overcoming the Stigma - Mental Health in Muslim Youth

The Breakdown - Ep 7: Overcoming the Stigma - Mental Health in Muslim Youth With mental health stigma proving to continually act as a barrier for people to seek help when necessary, especially among young Muslims, Zayn Ahmad and Aneesa Merali sit down to discuss these pertinent issues in our communities with director of Muslim Youth Helpline, Zohra Khaku. In this podcast, they discuss the issues surrounding mental health, including the ‘taboo topics’, as well as how we can improve as a community, and Zohra shares insights into the amazing work done at MYH by her and their dedicated team of volunteers. This Episode is Sponsored by Not Just Travel Booking a holiday is about so much more than just flights and a hotel. Not Just Travel believe in providing a seamless journey to your next holiday experience; from picking the perfect destination to adding those little extras that make your holiday that bit more special. Call Akhtar Jaffer on 07453 906906 to book your next holiday experience the Not Just Travel way.

43 MINJUL 2
Comments
The Breakdown - Ep 7: Overcoming the Stigma - Mental Health in Muslim Youth

How does Imam Ali recommend we deal with the post-Ramadan blues?

One of the common phrases we hear after finishing a journey or interval from somewhere is ‘I have post holiday blues’. This is because after returning to normality or worse still, the rat race, we feel a low compared to the fervour and pace of what what before. We also hear this type of phrase of ‘post Ziyarat blues’ and ‘post Ramadan blues’ for this same reason: So much enjoyment from the spirit and efforts of the month become replaced by a return to our daily grind and so we feel a disconnect or shortfall in our spirituality. Why does this occur and how do we navigate this? The Qur’an gives a clear reasoning for this low feeling. "And whoever turns away from My remembrance, his shall live a depressed life, and We will raise him on the day of resurrection, blind” (20:124) In thecontext of the Month ofRamadan, we build up so many good practises and God-consciousness by virtue of creating a new environment for ourselves personally and communally, that a return to what it was like previously will certainly leave a deficit. The verse gives both a worldly and next-worldly outcome of turning away from Allah's reminders: In this world, one will live miserably but worse still in the next world be raised blind. The subsequent verses explain such a person will ask on the Day of Judgement"He shall say: My Lord! why hast Thou raised me blind and I was a seeing one indeed?” The reply enforces the warning of not turning away from Allahswat’s remembrance:"He will say: Thus it is so, Our communications came to you but you had forsaken them; thus shall you be forsaken this day.” (20:125-126). Narrations indicate to the necessity of holding onto that environment that has been created and especially its people, those who will retain the good practises of the holy month such that you would too. Imam Ali (a) is narrated to have said, "Never hold on to one who turns back and do not separate from the one who moves forward.” This means that he who turns back into his normal practises, as he will feel those lows, one should not hold onto him as you will partake and absorb from him whilst those whom you find keep up their fervour, we are instructed not to separate from him. But Imam Ali (a) tells us to have a watchful, discerning eye stating, "It may be that sometimes the one who turns back moves forward and the one who moves forward turns back”. In thisoccasion the one who turns back, means he who turns back to God such as through Tawbah. It may be that he regrets not maximising the blessed month and has vowed to improve thereafter while he who thinks he is moving forward may not be due to something corrupting his service such a pride or impatience. May Allah make us amongst those who uphold the accomplishments of the Month of Ramadan and allow us to witness it again next year.

22 MINJUN 8
Comments
How does Imam Ali recommend we deal with the post-Ramadan blues?

Ep 4 - Sehri Sessions: Ramadhan Reflections?

Ep 4 - Sehri Sessions: Ramadhan Reflections? Join the boys for a laid back style second episode of Sehri Sessions - a circle where we discuss our opinions, experiences and ambitions as youth in a light-hearted setting. This episode, we share our thoughts on Ramadhan, the nights of Qdar, the run up to Eid and making changes beyond Ramadhan. Have any topic suggestions or questions you’d like to hear discussed? Hit us up on our social media accounts - @alhaadiyouth

41 MINJUN 4
Comments
Ep 4 - Sehri Sessions: Ramadhan Reflections?

Latest Episodes

Ep 3 - Tales of the tenth: Dreams foreshadowing Ashura

How well do we know the characters of Karbala? What were the key drivers behind the actions of the villains of Ashura? How did their main motivations differ from eachother? How did some of the dreams of the Ahlul Bayt foreshadow the events on that fateful day? In our new mini Muharram series, Tales of the Tenth, we go in depth in all of this and much more in a series of short podcasts. We are delighted to be *joined by Father Christopher Clohessy*, author and academic of Shi’i Studies in Rome. Join us as we now shift our focus to the various dreams people had regarding the day of Ashura. In particular, who had these dreams and how how did they foreshadow Karbala? How did they describe the army of Yazid? And how in the end, did it reveal that the tragedy of Karbala was destined to happen? Join Abbas & Mohammed in this episode, where we concentrate on the recollections of Umme Salma, one of the wives of our holy Prophet.

20 MIN4 days ago
Comments
Ep 3 - Tales of the tenth: Dreams foreshadowing Ashura

Ep 2 - Tales of the tenth: The personality of Umar ibn Sa'ad

Join us for an academic examination into the life of the accursed Umar ibn Sa’ad. How well do we know the characters of Karbala? What were the key drivers behind the actions of the villains of Ashura? How did their main motivations differ from eachother? How did some of the dreams of the Ahlul Bayt foreshadow the events on that fateful day? In our new mini Muharram series, Tales of the Tenth, we go in depth in all of this and much more in a series of short podcasts. We are delighted to be joined by Father Christopher Clohessy, author and academic of Shi’i Studies in Rome.

17 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Ep 2 - Tales of the tenth: The personality of Umar ibn Sa'ad

Ep 1 - Tales of the tenth: The personality of Shimr bin Dhil Jawshan

Join us for an academic examination into the life of the accursed Shimr bin Dhil-Jawshan. How well do we know the characters of Karbala? What were the key drivers behind the actions of the villains of Ashura? How did their main motivations differ from eachother? How did some of the dreams of the Ahlul Bayt foreshadow the events on that fateful day? In our new mini Muharram series, Tales of the Tenth, we go in depth in all of this and much more in a series of short podcasts. We are delighted to be joined by Father Christopher Clohessy, author and academic of Shi’i Studies in Rome.

21 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Ep 1 - Tales of the tenth: The personality of Shimr bin Dhil Jawshan

The Breakdown - Ep 8: The Hawza Experience - What is it like to study in an Islamic Seminary?

Is the Hawza still relevant for Western Muslims in 2019? Do we have infrastructure to encourage and support female students? What must one consider when looking at studying in an Islamic seminary? In this eye-opening segment, Ahmed and Abbas are joined by Br. Sadiq Meghjee - a Hawza student in Qom, who answers various pertinent questions on the need for seminaries and the reality of modern day traditional Islamic studies. If you have questions for Sadiq after listening to this segment, or if you have any other topic/guest suggestions, you can reach on on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram - @alhaadiyouth. Hope you enjoy listening!

49 MINAUG 17
Comments
The Breakdown - Ep 8: The Hawza Experience - What is it like to study in an Islamic Seminary?

Friday Sermon: Using the faults in others to help see the faults within you

In this khutba, we propose the principle that when you notice a fault in a person, this should be enough of a lesson for yourself to take note and ensure you do not practise that act yourself. This principle is mentioned in the hadith by Imam Mohammed al-Baqir (a) who stated, "Sufficient is a person’s own defect (in himself) that he tries to pick and look for faults in other people when he himself has those same faults in himself (and does not recognize them." It is often thecase that when a person does a bad act we notice it. It can be anything like how a person reacts to traffic on the road, or whether they keep in touch with their family members, a face they make when asked to do something, how they eat. All of these may beinnocuous acts but they do not go unnoticed by ourselves and infact may often grind or irk us or make us wish they did not act like this. However, it is also the case that more often than not we also have the same or similar trait - but just don't realise it! The Qur'an tells us not to laugh at others nor fault find: "O you who have believed, let not a people ridicule [another] people; perhaps they may be better than them; nor let women ridicule [other] women; perhaps they may be better than them. And do not fault find amongst yourselves" (49:11). The scholars of Akhlaq add the following prescriptions to remedy or navigate this sort of heedlessness.When a person see's an act they dislike, either they truly do perform that act themselves or truly they do not. i) In the case where they do not, they should first thank Allah (swt) for having purified them that they do not commit that act. This is because guidance success is from Allah (swt) in the first place and so He is the prime cause of one's goodness. In sincerelythanking Allah (swt) he would keep you protected from this and improve you even further, as He states, "If you are grateful, I will surely increase you further [in favour]" (Qur'an 14:7). If one is not humble to this, certainly they will soon fall foul and perform that act themselves. ii) In the case where they do perform such an act, it is most likely that Allah (swt) has covered that act such that most people will have never seen it performed. Allah (swt) indeed is the concealer of defects. The books of supplication are replete with lines of du'a that should be recited at this moment. For example: My God, so to Thee belongs praise! How many of my flaws Thou hast covered over without exposing me! How many of my sins Thou hast cloaked without making me notorious! How many faults I have committed, yet Thou didst not tear away from me their covering iii) And alsoIn the case where they do perform such an act, one may entreat Allah (swt) to remove that practise inthemselves for just as you dislike to see it in others, you should dislike it for your own self. Conclusion It is normal to notice and dislike a bad trait or reaction in someone else; this is a sign of a healthy conscious and an awareness of inappropriate behaviours. However, it is just as normal that though we dislike something in others, we may find that same practise in ourselves. This noticing it in others and our own reaction to it should be sufficient as a means of self-improvement. After noticing it in others and in ourown selves, the aware and God-conscious (Muttaqi) person takes himself to account greater than he would take another person to account. He holds himself to a greaterresponsibility for removing that action before expecting another to stop it. In this way he is more focused on his own development than finding faults with another. InshaAllah next week we will build on this principle with another Akhlaqi formula.

25 MINJUL 31
Comments
Friday Sermon: Using the faults in others to help see the faults within you

Friday Sermon: Make your private behaviour better than your public behaviour

In this series of Friday Sermon's, we shall be focused on improving our character and mannerisms. Each week we will pick one Akhlaqi principle and delve into some of its features, the idea being that from one week to the next we make a special and dedicated intention to implement this particular practise. God-willing over the week, this one practise will help us to improve that element of our moral nature, preparing us for the following weeks principle. This of course is based on the noble character of the holy Prophet Muhammad (s) who the holy Qur'an tells us, "Indeed in the Messenger of Allah, you have an excellent model for the one who seeks God, the Day of Judgement and remembers God unceasingly" (33:21). Our first Akhlaqi principle is to make our private behaviour surpass our public behaviour. It is often the case that our public behaviour is better than our private behaviour. This is because when we are in public, we want the best version of ourselves to be seen and so we become very aware of how we act; when in our private circles however, we revert to default behaviours or are less concerned with how people see us. This manifests itself in many ways: In public, I may never swear but in private I may. In private I will watch things I would never watch in public. In public the length of my Salaat is very long but in private it is extremely quick or with the TV still on. In public I will smile and talk nicely to people at the Mosque but when I return home, I am grumpy and would never spend time talking to my family and so on. This is problematic because of the hypocrisy it builds within us and normalises this dichotomy, entrenching its practises further. The narrations specify that when our inward state is corrupted so too will our outward behaviours be, as we will not always be able to control ourselves and these inward states will manifest themselves. But similarly when our outward behaviours are problematic such as acting differently, it will corrupt our inward realities. For example one narration states, "When the outward gets corrupted, the inward also gets corrupted."

24 MINJUL 30
Comments
Friday Sermon: Make your private behaviour better than your public behaviour

A Hajj Veteran of 30 Years! - Interview with Ahmed Dungersi

Join Sheikh Jaffer Ladak and Ahmed Dungersi as they discuss his 30 years as chairman of the European Hajj Mission, how has he seen Mecca change and what happened when his group of 150 people were arrested?

46 MINJUL 17
Comments
A Hajj Veteran of 30 Years! - Interview with Ahmed Dungersi

The Breakdown - Ep 7: Overcoming the Stigma - Mental Health in Muslim Youth

The Breakdown - Ep 7: Overcoming the Stigma - Mental Health in Muslim Youth With mental health stigma proving to continually act as a barrier for people to seek help when necessary, especially among young Muslims, Zayn Ahmad and Aneesa Merali sit down to discuss these pertinent issues in our communities with director of Muslim Youth Helpline, Zohra Khaku. In this podcast, they discuss the issues surrounding mental health, including the ‘taboo topics’, as well as how we can improve as a community, and Zohra shares insights into the amazing work done at MYH by her and their dedicated team of volunteers. This Episode is Sponsored by Not Just Travel Booking a holiday is about so much more than just flights and a hotel. Not Just Travel believe in providing a seamless journey to your next holiday experience; from picking the perfect destination to adding those little extras that make your holiday that bit more special. Call Akhtar Jaffer on 07453 906906 to book your next holiday experience the Not Just Travel way.

43 MINJUL 2
Comments
The Breakdown - Ep 7: Overcoming the Stigma - Mental Health in Muslim Youth

How does Imam Ali recommend we deal with the post-Ramadan blues?

One of the common phrases we hear after finishing a journey or interval from somewhere is ‘I have post holiday blues’. This is because after returning to normality or worse still, the rat race, we feel a low compared to the fervour and pace of what what before. We also hear this type of phrase of ‘post Ziyarat blues’ and ‘post Ramadan blues’ for this same reason: So much enjoyment from the spirit and efforts of the month become replaced by a return to our daily grind and so we feel a disconnect or shortfall in our spirituality. Why does this occur and how do we navigate this? The Qur’an gives a clear reasoning for this low feeling. "And whoever turns away from My remembrance, his shall live a depressed life, and We will raise him on the day of resurrection, blind” (20:124) In thecontext of the Month ofRamadan, we build up so many good practises and God-consciousness by virtue of creating a new environment for ourselves personally and communally, that a return to what it was like previously will certainly leave a deficit. The verse gives both a worldly and next-worldly outcome of turning away from Allah's reminders: In this world, one will live miserably but worse still in the next world be raised blind. The subsequent verses explain such a person will ask on the Day of Judgement"He shall say: My Lord! why hast Thou raised me blind and I was a seeing one indeed?” The reply enforces the warning of not turning away from Allahswat’s remembrance:"He will say: Thus it is so, Our communications came to you but you had forsaken them; thus shall you be forsaken this day.” (20:125-126). Narrations indicate to the necessity of holding onto that environment that has been created and especially its people, those who will retain the good practises of the holy month such that you would too. Imam Ali (a) is narrated to have said, "Never hold on to one who turns back and do not separate from the one who moves forward.” This means that he who turns back into his normal practises, as he will feel those lows, one should not hold onto him as you will partake and absorb from him whilst those whom you find keep up their fervour, we are instructed not to separate from him. But Imam Ali (a) tells us to have a watchful, discerning eye stating, "It may be that sometimes the one who turns back moves forward and the one who moves forward turns back”. In thisoccasion the one who turns back, means he who turns back to God such as through Tawbah. It may be that he regrets not maximising the blessed month and has vowed to improve thereafter while he who thinks he is moving forward may not be due to something corrupting his service such a pride or impatience. May Allah make us amongst those who uphold the accomplishments of the Month of Ramadan and allow us to witness it again next year.

22 MINJUN 8
Comments
How does Imam Ali recommend we deal with the post-Ramadan blues?

Ep 4 - Sehri Sessions: Ramadhan Reflections?

Ep 4 - Sehri Sessions: Ramadhan Reflections? Join the boys for a laid back style second episode of Sehri Sessions - a circle where we discuss our opinions, experiences and ambitions as youth in a light-hearted setting. This episode, we share our thoughts on Ramadhan, the nights of Qdar, the run up to Eid and making changes beyond Ramadhan. Have any topic suggestions or questions you’d like to hear discussed? Hit us up on our social media accounts - @alhaadiyouth

41 MINJUN 4
Comments
Ep 4 - Sehri Sessions: Ramadhan Reflections?