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Sunshine Parenting

Audrey Monke

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Sunshine Parenting
Sunshine Parenting

Sunshine Parenting

Audrey Monke

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About Us

Camp Director, Mom, Author, and Speaker Audrey Monke and other youth development experts discuss summer camp, family life, raising thriving kids, and ideas for living more connected and happier lives.

Latest Episodes

Ep. 101: Entitlemania with Richard Watts

"Giving too much is oftentimes an affliction of the wealthy, but taking away the struggle is a problem with everybody." -Richard Watts "Palm trees, in that process of growing, what's actually happening in the wind is they're actually cracking and they're breaking. And when the skin breaks, they scar. And when they scar, they become stronger. And as they get older and older, they get to the point where they have so much scarring that they can withstand almost any storm. And what we do with our kids, it's almost like taking a palm tree indoors. We want to grow them and nurture them in a greenhouse..." -Richard Watts Entitlemania: How Not to Spoil Your Kids, and What to Do if You Have Back in April, when Sara Kuljis and I spoke at Pegasus School, parents there told me about Richard Watts, who had spoken at the school earlier in the year. We were introduced, and he then sent me a copy of his book Entitlemania. In this episode, we talk about the book and Richard's ideas about what to do and what not to do when it comes to passing along your family business, planning for your estate, and giving your kids big gifts. BIG IDEAS Certain difficulties and issues go along with being very wealthy. When people get very wealthy they tend to become isolated and suspicious because the people around them usually have an ulterior motive in getting to know them. By insulating your kids and buying their way out of failure, you're not allowing them to learn about long-term staying power, how to manage themselves or to discover their passion. It seems that everybody at all income levels, in this generation of parents, wants to take away the problems from their kids, hold them close, and make sure that they don't ever get hurt. By getting things wrong, kids learn how to get things right. Taking over the family business can place a child on a path of a career choice that's not being found or directed by that child, and, as a result, they will lack passion. It's not healthy to bring your kids into your estate planning too early because it takes away the incentive for them to go forward and do their own thing. It's important to ensure that however you give your kids money, you don't change their current lifestyle. QUOTES Richard: "The entitlement issue brings on two different components. One, giving too much, and two, taking away the struggle. Giving too much is oftentimes an affliction of the wealthy, but taking away the struggle is a problem with everybody." Audrey: "It's so true that in nature we have a great example of what we need to do for our kids, which is to allow them to get blown around a little when they're small, more and more as they get older, and help them, be there for them, but not stop them from bending and going through those difficult, challenging circumstances." Richard: "By getting it wrong, they will learn to get it right. Richard: "The reason that I generally believe that family businesses create conflict is that it starts a child on a path of a career choice and a passion that's not being found or directed by the child. And oftentimes, it causes a lot of family disharmony." Richard: "You can never outrun someone who's being fueled by passion. Never. The person with a passion can live it all day long, they can sleep it all night long, they can get up in the morning and do it, but they're so passionate because they built it and they own it, that they go 100%. Well, when you do that kind of a job, it's oftentimes very difficult for a child to follow and not feel like they have this unspoken criticism of never measuring up to what Mom and Dad did." Richard: "If I were doing it the right way, I would have the daughter go and work for a competitor, and say, 'Here, go get a job over there, and look around and spend two to three years working there and see if you like it, without having the nepotism of everyone knowing that you had the right last name, and so everyone's going to treat you special. You need to go over there and

35 MIN2 days ago
Comments
Ep. 101: Entitlemania with Richard Watts

Ep. 100: Teens' Advice for Raising Responsible, Independent Kids

In Episode 100, I'm chatting with an amazing group of young adults ages 16 and 17 who participated in a month-long junior counselor program. They share their thoughts on ways parents can raise thriving, independent and responsible young adults. BIG IDEAS To help kids learn, gain confidence and independence, there are things parents should be letting their kids do early on, such as: traveling alone, navigating the airport, even flying by themselves packing bags, getting their own school stuff together doing their own laundry cooking (especially holiday meals), managing their time Establish expectations and a level of trust with your teen. Using technology to track your kids can cause unnecessary stress. Camp is a great break for parents because they don’t track their kids. They know they’re safe and so they can relax. Talk ahead of time about safe, comfortable ways to communicate with your teen while they are out so that you can be there to help when needed. Trust first. Trust that your child is responsible until they prove you wrong. QUOTES Audrey: "When parents are there (kids) just kind of default to letting them do it all because they’re so used to doing it. It's easy for parents to just drag (kids) along. But parents can start putting kids in charge, even when they’re there, and they can start that really young.” Audrey: “When you think about college and who you want in your dorm, you want people who’ve had experience taking care of themselves a little bit and living in a shared space.” Audrey: “When kids are going to preschool and you’re helping them get their lunchbox ready, that is appropriate. But I think sometimes it just keeps going a little too long. You could switch over to just saying, ‘Okay not that you’re in (whatever grade) you get to start being in charge of remembering your own lunch’ and that kind of thing.” Audrey: “If someone else packs your backpack for you every day, at what point do you figure out what you need and how to do it yourself?” Audrey: “Being aware that you have things to learn is the starting point. A lot of it is your responsibility to figure out. So, if your parents empower you like, ‘Hey—what are the things you want to learn this year?’ that is a big deal." Audrey: “It’s kind of interesting how focused we are on academic stuff, but we neglect to learn some things that are part of being an independent person like being able to take care of your belongings, your laundry, your feeding, all that stuff.” Teens: “Kids love to cook, too. Instead of saying, ‘No, can I just get this done?’ allow them to do little tasks like mixing the brownie mix, cracking the eggs. Encouraging that at a young age spikes interest and eventually, you don’t even realize that you already learned how to scramble eggs or make a quesadilla.” Teens: “I wish my parents gave me more responsibility and made me feel like they trusted me. My parents do track me wherever I go, check all my social media, look at my phone and I have no privacy. That makes me feel like I’m not trusted or like I don’t have as much of my own life. If they gave me more freedom, I feel like it could be better.” Audrey: “The problem is that you can’t prove to someone that you can do something until you’re given the opportunity to try it.” Audrey: “We’re living in a time where parents are very fear-based. They’re so worried that something terrible is going to happen and we believe that if we know where you are, something terrible is not going to happen. But it’s kind of weird because just knowing where someone is doesn’t mean that or really make the difference.” Audrey: “If something’s not going well, I want my kids to come to me and ask for advice if they need me to help but I don’t want my kids to be thinking that I’m going to take care of it for them.” Audrey: “Anything that someone else if doing for you means that there is no motivation to figure it out for yourself. If you know someone else is going to take care of it, why would you star

33 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Ep. 100: Teens' Advice for Raising Responsible, Independent Kids

The Myth of the Perfect Girl with Ana Homayoun

The Myth of the Perfect Girl In Episode 99, I talk with Ana Homayoun, a nationally recognized counselor and consultant specializing in positive strategies for junior high and high school students. Ana was previously on the podcast (Ep. 45) talking about her book Social Media Wellness: Helping Tweens and Teens Thrive in an Unbalanced Digital World (Corwin Teaching Essentials). I feel equally as enthusiastic about her book, The Myth of the Perfect Girl: Helping Our Daughters Find Authentic Success and Happiness in School and Life, and that's the book we talk about in this episode. We cover a few of the topics from the book, including why girls tend to think they have to be perfect, why girls are especially sensitive to and influenced by the expectations of others, and ways we can encourage our daughters to seek their own path and their own interests in life. Big Ideas Ana and her team at Green Ivy Educational Consulting want kids to develop into thoughtful, resilient, and interesting young people. And to take those skills to college and beyond. It's important for kids to find a sense of joy and fulfillment, and also a sense of purpose and meaning in their daily work, both inside and outside of the classroom. There's a lot around the culture of perfectionism that doesn't go away when we get older. We all need to reflect and get to know what's important to us, and what our own values are, to be the most powerful that we can be within our own minds. Girls often struggle to figure out what brings them a personal sense of purpose, joy, and fulfillment, in their quest to achieve external standards of perfection. Kids need to have some time off. Children need to understand whether what they are doing is energizing or draining. Summer camp offers kids a change in schedule, and an opportunity to learn things in a different environment. Parents should focus on having compassion, empathy, and understanding around social media use, and also around their child being a middle-schooler or a high-schooler in general. Parents need to understand and accept unconditionally who their kids are. Spiritual wellness is important, as well as social, emotional, and physical wellness. Quotes Ana: "So much around the culture of perfectionism doesn't go away when we get older." Ana: "We see the research that says anxiety and depression, particularly among teen girls, are increasing. I think part of it is if we back up and figure out why are we not having the conversation around purpose and meaning earlier? So that kids can explore and build their own blueprint, rather than what I call 'borrow someone else's'. In the book, I call it 'filling the box' rather than 'building your own'. What it means really, is that you're constantly looking at what everyone else is doing, rather than figuring out 'what's important to me. What are my values? How are my daily habits reflecting those values or moving me closer, or away from those values?' " Ana: "Parents need to help their kids identify what energizes them and what drains them. And to look at their behaviors accordingly. A mistake we make around social media and technology is that we always tell kids what they should be doing. But we don't even look at our own modeling around it." Ana: "Instead of coming from a place of anger and frustration, parents should really focus on having compassion, empathy, and understanding, not just around social media use, but really around being a middle-schooler or a high-schooler in general. Because the combination of going through puberty, and having excessive academic and extra-curricular and athletic expectations, is a never-ending 'nothing is ever good enough.' " Ana: "The number one thing that middle-school and high-school girls can benefit from is parents who assess their own house, socially. Even if you feel so secure as an adult, there is that twinge of challenge when you watch your child struggle socially." Ana: "Understand who your child is and accept them for w

34 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
The Myth of the Perfect Girl with Ana Homayoun

Ep. 98: "Camplifying" the World with Tom Rosenberg

In Episode 98, I’m chatting with Tom Rosenberg, CEO of the American Camp Association. Last year, in Episode 46, we talked about summer camp, accreditation, and #CampKindnessDay (July 23, 2019). In this episode, we talk about the research about the positive impact of camp, our joint passion for partnering with parents to bring camp to schools an

39 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Ep. 98: "Camplifying" the World with Tom Rosenberg

Ep. 97: Parenting the Challenging Child

In Episode 97, I’m chatting with Signe Whitson. We talk about her book, Parenting The Challenging Child: The Four-Step Way To Turn Problem Situations Into Learning Opportunities, which is based on her work at the Life Space Crisis Intervention, an organization dedicated to training teachers, counselors, and parents on how to appropriately re

46 MINJUL 20
Comments
Ep. 97: Parenting the Challenging Child

Ep. 96: Unplugged & Happy at Camp

In Episode 96, I’m talking with my friend Brooke Cheley-Klebe of Cheley Colorado Camps. We cover a range of summer camp-related topics including longer camp stays, adjusting to camp and overcoming homesickness, what it’s like for teenagers to have the much-needed break from screens, video games, and social media that traditional summer camp programs provide, and the life-long friendships that

36 MINJUL 13
Comments
Ep. 96: Unplugged & Happy at Camp

Ep. 95: Raising a "Yes Brain" Child with Tina Payne Bryson

Enter the drawing for a free copy of Happy Campers AND The YES Brain! * Write a review of Sunshine Parenting in iTunes (or wherever you listen to podcasts). * Send Audrey an email with a copy of your review. Include your shipping address. Drawing will be held on

28 MINJUL 6
Comments
Ep. 95: Raising a "Yes Brain" Child with Tina Payne Bryson

Ep. 94: Happy Campers Book Club Kick Off

In Episode 94, I talk about why I wrote my new book, Happy Campers- Nine Summer Camp Secrets For Raising Kids Who Become Thriving Adults, why I changed to a ‘less is more’ style of parenting, how the book is set up, who I wrote the book for, how I want people to use the book, and what we’re going to be doing in the Happy Campers Book Club this summer! Why I wrote Happy Campers

23 MINJUN 29
Comments
Ep. 94: Happy Campers Book Club Kick Off

Ep. 93: Teaching Healthy Relationship Skills to Improve Lives

In Episode 93, I interview Dr. Alicia La Hoz, a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Founder, and Executive Director of Family Bridges. Dr. La Hoz works with the Latino community in the Chicagoland area, where she leads her team in developing and coordinating Family Bridges comprehensive marriage and relationship programs. Away from the office, she spends her time with her two inquisitive children and devoted husband, exploring nature, visiting museums,

25 MINJUN 22
Comments
Ep. 93: Teaching Healthy Relationship Skills to Improve Lives

Ep. 92: Creating Strong Relationships with Teens

In Episode 92, I’m chatting with educator and parent coach, Helaina Altabef, founder of Tame the Teen. We talk about building up the attributes parents need to form strong, caring relationships with teens. BIG IDEAS * There is a lot of disconnection between parents and their kids. * It is possible for parents to learn how to communicate effectively and connect with their teens. * Our current society has b

28 MINJUN 15
Comments
Ep. 92: Creating Strong Relationships with Teens

Latest Episodes

Ep. 101: Entitlemania with Richard Watts

"Giving too much is oftentimes an affliction of the wealthy, but taking away the struggle is a problem with everybody." -Richard Watts "Palm trees, in that process of growing, what's actually happening in the wind is they're actually cracking and they're breaking. And when the skin breaks, they scar. And when they scar, they become stronger. And as they get older and older, they get to the point where they have so much scarring that they can withstand almost any storm. And what we do with our kids, it's almost like taking a palm tree indoors. We want to grow them and nurture them in a greenhouse..." -Richard Watts Entitlemania: How Not to Spoil Your Kids, and What to Do if You Have Back in April, when Sara Kuljis and I spoke at Pegasus School, parents there told me about Richard Watts, who had spoken at the school earlier in the year. We were introduced, and he then sent me a copy of his book Entitlemania. In this episode, we talk about the book and Richard's ideas about what to do and what not to do when it comes to passing along your family business, planning for your estate, and giving your kids big gifts. BIG IDEAS Certain difficulties and issues go along with being very wealthy. When people get very wealthy they tend to become isolated and suspicious because the people around them usually have an ulterior motive in getting to know them. By insulating your kids and buying their way out of failure, you're not allowing them to learn about long-term staying power, how to manage themselves or to discover their passion. It seems that everybody at all income levels, in this generation of parents, wants to take away the problems from their kids, hold them close, and make sure that they don't ever get hurt. By getting things wrong, kids learn how to get things right. Taking over the family business can place a child on a path of a career choice that's not being found or directed by that child, and, as a result, they will lack passion. It's not healthy to bring your kids into your estate planning too early because it takes away the incentive for them to go forward and do their own thing. It's important to ensure that however you give your kids money, you don't change their current lifestyle. QUOTES Richard: "The entitlement issue brings on two different components. One, giving too much, and two, taking away the struggle. Giving too much is oftentimes an affliction of the wealthy, but taking away the struggle is a problem with everybody." Audrey: "It's so true that in nature we have a great example of what we need to do for our kids, which is to allow them to get blown around a little when they're small, more and more as they get older, and help them, be there for them, but not stop them from bending and going through those difficult, challenging circumstances." Richard: "By getting it wrong, they will learn to get it right. Richard: "The reason that I generally believe that family businesses create conflict is that it starts a child on a path of a career choice and a passion that's not being found or directed by the child. And oftentimes, it causes a lot of family disharmony." Richard: "You can never outrun someone who's being fueled by passion. Never. The person with a passion can live it all day long, they can sleep it all night long, they can get up in the morning and do it, but they're so passionate because they built it and they own it, that they go 100%. Well, when you do that kind of a job, it's oftentimes very difficult for a child to follow and not feel like they have this unspoken criticism of never measuring up to what Mom and Dad did." Richard: "If I were doing it the right way, I would have the daughter go and work for a competitor, and say, 'Here, go get a job over there, and look around and spend two to three years working there and see if you like it, without having the nepotism of everyone knowing that you had the right last name, and so everyone's going to treat you special. You need to go over there and

35 MIN2 days ago
Comments
Ep. 101: Entitlemania with Richard Watts

Ep. 100: Teens' Advice for Raising Responsible, Independent Kids

In Episode 100, I'm chatting with an amazing group of young adults ages 16 and 17 who participated in a month-long junior counselor program. They share their thoughts on ways parents can raise thriving, independent and responsible young adults. BIG IDEAS To help kids learn, gain confidence and independence, there are things parents should be letting their kids do early on, such as: traveling alone, navigating the airport, even flying by themselves packing bags, getting their own school stuff together doing their own laundry cooking (especially holiday meals), managing their time Establish expectations and a level of trust with your teen. Using technology to track your kids can cause unnecessary stress. Camp is a great break for parents because they don’t track their kids. They know they’re safe and so they can relax. Talk ahead of time about safe, comfortable ways to communicate with your teen while they are out so that you can be there to help when needed. Trust first. Trust that your child is responsible until they prove you wrong. QUOTES Audrey: "When parents are there (kids) just kind of default to letting them do it all because they’re so used to doing it. It's easy for parents to just drag (kids) along. But parents can start putting kids in charge, even when they’re there, and they can start that really young.” Audrey: “When you think about college and who you want in your dorm, you want people who’ve had experience taking care of themselves a little bit and living in a shared space.” Audrey: “When kids are going to preschool and you’re helping them get their lunchbox ready, that is appropriate. But I think sometimes it just keeps going a little too long. You could switch over to just saying, ‘Okay not that you’re in (whatever grade) you get to start being in charge of remembering your own lunch’ and that kind of thing.” Audrey: “If someone else packs your backpack for you every day, at what point do you figure out what you need and how to do it yourself?” Audrey: “Being aware that you have things to learn is the starting point. A lot of it is your responsibility to figure out. So, if your parents empower you like, ‘Hey—what are the things you want to learn this year?’ that is a big deal." Audrey: “It’s kind of interesting how focused we are on academic stuff, but we neglect to learn some things that are part of being an independent person like being able to take care of your belongings, your laundry, your feeding, all that stuff.” Teens: “Kids love to cook, too. Instead of saying, ‘No, can I just get this done?’ allow them to do little tasks like mixing the brownie mix, cracking the eggs. Encouraging that at a young age spikes interest and eventually, you don’t even realize that you already learned how to scramble eggs or make a quesadilla.” Teens: “I wish my parents gave me more responsibility and made me feel like they trusted me. My parents do track me wherever I go, check all my social media, look at my phone and I have no privacy. That makes me feel like I’m not trusted or like I don’t have as much of my own life. If they gave me more freedom, I feel like it could be better.” Audrey: “The problem is that you can’t prove to someone that you can do something until you’re given the opportunity to try it.” Audrey: “We’re living in a time where parents are very fear-based. They’re so worried that something terrible is going to happen and we believe that if we know where you are, something terrible is not going to happen. But it’s kind of weird because just knowing where someone is doesn’t mean that or really make the difference.” Audrey: “If something’s not going well, I want my kids to come to me and ask for advice if they need me to help but I don’t want my kids to be thinking that I’m going to take care of it for them.” Audrey: “Anything that someone else if doing for you means that there is no motivation to figure it out for yourself. If you know someone else is going to take care of it, why would you star

33 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Ep. 100: Teens' Advice for Raising Responsible, Independent Kids

The Myth of the Perfect Girl with Ana Homayoun

The Myth of the Perfect Girl In Episode 99, I talk with Ana Homayoun, a nationally recognized counselor and consultant specializing in positive strategies for junior high and high school students. Ana was previously on the podcast (Ep. 45) talking about her book Social Media Wellness: Helping Tweens and Teens Thrive in an Unbalanced Digital World (Corwin Teaching Essentials). I feel equally as enthusiastic about her book, The Myth of the Perfect Girl: Helping Our Daughters Find Authentic Success and Happiness in School and Life, and that's the book we talk about in this episode. We cover a few of the topics from the book, including why girls tend to think they have to be perfect, why girls are especially sensitive to and influenced by the expectations of others, and ways we can encourage our daughters to seek their own path and their own interests in life. Big Ideas Ana and her team at Green Ivy Educational Consulting want kids to develop into thoughtful, resilient, and interesting young people. And to take those skills to college and beyond. It's important for kids to find a sense of joy and fulfillment, and also a sense of purpose and meaning in their daily work, both inside and outside of the classroom. There's a lot around the culture of perfectionism that doesn't go away when we get older. We all need to reflect and get to know what's important to us, and what our own values are, to be the most powerful that we can be within our own minds. Girls often struggle to figure out what brings them a personal sense of purpose, joy, and fulfillment, in their quest to achieve external standards of perfection. Kids need to have some time off. Children need to understand whether what they are doing is energizing or draining. Summer camp offers kids a change in schedule, and an opportunity to learn things in a different environment. Parents should focus on having compassion, empathy, and understanding around social media use, and also around their child being a middle-schooler or a high-schooler in general. Parents need to understand and accept unconditionally who their kids are. Spiritual wellness is important, as well as social, emotional, and physical wellness. Quotes Ana: "So much around the culture of perfectionism doesn't go away when we get older." Ana: "We see the research that says anxiety and depression, particularly among teen girls, are increasing. I think part of it is if we back up and figure out why are we not having the conversation around purpose and meaning earlier? So that kids can explore and build their own blueprint, rather than what I call 'borrow someone else's'. In the book, I call it 'filling the box' rather than 'building your own'. What it means really, is that you're constantly looking at what everyone else is doing, rather than figuring out 'what's important to me. What are my values? How are my daily habits reflecting those values or moving me closer, or away from those values?' " Ana: "Parents need to help their kids identify what energizes them and what drains them. And to look at their behaviors accordingly. A mistake we make around social media and technology is that we always tell kids what they should be doing. But we don't even look at our own modeling around it." Ana: "Instead of coming from a place of anger and frustration, parents should really focus on having compassion, empathy, and understanding, not just around social media use, but really around being a middle-schooler or a high-schooler in general. Because the combination of going through puberty, and having excessive academic and extra-curricular and athletic expectations, is a never-ending 'nothing is ever good enough.' " Ana: "The number one thing that middle-school and high-school girls can benefit from is parents who assess their own house, socially. Even if you feel so secure as an adult, there is that twinge of challenge when you watch your child struggle socially." Ana: "Understand who your child is and accept them for w

34 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
The Myth of the Perfect Girl with Ana Homayoun

Ep. 98: "Camplifying" the World with Tom Rosenberg

In Episode 98, I’m chatting with Tom Rosenberg, CEO of the American Camp Association. Last year, in Episode 46, we talked about summer camp, accreditation, and #CampKindnessDay (July 23, 2019). In this episode, we talk about the research about the positive impact of camp, our joint passion for partnering with parents to bring camp to schools an

39 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Ep. 98: "Camplifying" the World with Tom Rosenberg

Ep. 97: Parenting the Challenging Child

In Episode 97, I’m chatting with Signe Whitson. We talk about her book, Parenting The Challenging Child: The Four-Step Way To Turn Problem Situations Into Learning Opportunities, which is based on her work at the Life Space Crisis Intervention, an organization dedicated to training teachers, counselors, and parents on how to appropriately re

46 MINJUL 20
Comments
Ep. 97: Parenting the Challenging Child

Ep. 96: Unplugged & Happy at Camp

In Episode 96, I’m talking with my friend Brooke Cheley-Klebe of Cheley Colorado Camps. We cover a range of summer camp-related topics including longer camp stays, adjusting to camp and overcoming homesickness, what it’s like for teenagers to have the much-needed break from screens, video games, and social media that traditional summer camp programs provide, and the life-long friendships that

36 MINJUL 13
Comments
Ep. 96: Unplugged & Happy at Camp

Ep. 95: Raising a "Yes Brain" Child with Tina Payne Bryson

Enter the drawing for a free copy of Happy Campers AND The YES Brain! * Write a review of Sunshine Parenting in iTunes (or wherever you listen to podcasts). * Send Audrey an email with a copy of your review. Include your shipping address. Drawing will be held on

28 MINJUL 6
Comments
Ep. 95: Raising a "Yes Brain" Child with Tina Payne Bryson

Ep. 94: Happy Campers Book Club Kick Off

In Episode 94, I talk about why I wrote my new book, Happy Campers- Nine Summer Camp Secrets For Raising Kids Who Become Thriving Adults, why I changed to a ‘less is more’ style of parenting, how the book is set up, who I wrote the book for, how I want people to use the book, and what we’re going to be doing in the Happy Campers Book Club this summer! Why I wrote Happy Campers

23 MINJUN 29
Comments
Ep. 94: Happy Campers Book Club Kick Off

Ep. 93: Teaching Healthy Relationship Skills to Improve Lives

In Episode 93, I interview Dr. Alicia La Hoz, a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Founder, and Executive Director of Family Bridges. Dr. La Hoz works with the Latino community in the Chicagoland area, where she leads her team in developing and coordinating Family Bridges comprehensive marriage and relationship programs. Away from the office, she spends her time with her two inquisitive children and devoted husband, exploring nature, visiting museums,

25 MINJUN 22
Comments
Ep. 93: Teaching Healthy Relationship Skills to Improve Lives

Ep. 92: Creating Strong Relationships with Teens

In Episode 92, I’m chatting with educator and parent coach, Helaina Altabef, founder of Tame the Teen. We talk about building up the attributes parents need to form strong, caring relationships with teens. BIG IDEAS * There is a lot of disconnection between parents and their kids. * It is possible for parents to learn how to communicate effectively and connect with their teens. * Our current society has b

28 MINJUN 15
Comments
Ep. 92: Creating Strong Relationships with Teens

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