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Authors on Their Books

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Authors on Their Books
Authors on Their Books

Authors on Their Books

The Huntington

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Plays
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About Us

As part of its regular program of public lectures, The Huntington hosts a variety of authors speaking about their own books on themes related to The Huntington’s collections.

Latest Episodes

Joy Ride

Architect David Martin discusses his book Joy Ride: An Architect’s Journey to Mexico’s Ancient and Colonial Places. A journal of his travels filled with sketches, photographs, and observations, Joy Ride celebrates the timeless sophistication of Mexico’s architecture and offers fresh insights into the country’s history and culture. Recorded July 27, 2017.

47 MIN2017 JUL 28
Comments
Joy Ride

Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

Based on the acclaimed science fiction novel Kindred by Octavia E. Butler, a new graphic adaptation by Damian Duffy and illustrator John Jennings gives fresh form to Butler’s powerful tale of slavery, time travel, and the inexorable pull of the past. Duffy and Jennings discuss the continuing relevance of Butler’s writings and how it has influenced their own work. Recorded July 24, 2017.

33 MIN2017 JUL 25
Comments
Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

Hilary Mantel: “I Met a Man Who Wasn’t There”

Tudor statesman Thomas Cromwell was described by an eminent historian as “not biographable.” Faced with an intractable puzzle, can a novelist do better? Hilary Mantel, two-time Booker Prize–winning author of “Wolf Hall” and its sequel “Bring Up the Bodies,” describes her 10-year effort to pin her compelling and elusive subject to the page. Mantel is currently working on the third book in the trilogy. Her papers are archived at The Huntington. This talk is part of the Ridge Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded May 11, 2017.

51 MIN2017 MAY 12
Comments
Hilary Mantel: “I Met a Man Who Wasn’t There”

The Art of Farming: How a Farmer Sees the Future

David Mas Masumoto, organic farmer and acclaimed author of Epitaph for a Peach and Harvest Son, is joined by his wife, Marcy Masumoto, for a lively talk about life on their Central California farm. Through stories that offer a personal perspective on growing organic crops, the Masumotos share their reflections on the vision required of artisan farmers in today’s food world. This talk is part of the Brody Lecture series at The Huntington. Recorded May 7, 2017.

64 MIN2017 MAY 8
Comments
The Art of Farming: How a Farmer Sees the Future

Remarkable New Discoveries from Hummingbird Rescue

Terry Masear, hummingbird rehabilitator, presents a lecture about nature’s tiny “flying jewels” and the work of the dedicated volunteers of the Los Angeles Hummingbird Rescue. Since its inception in 2007, the group has rehabilitated and released back into the wild 10,000 orphaned or injured birds. Masear also has also written a book on the subject titled Fastest Things on Wings: Rescuing Hummingbirds in Hollywood. This talk is part of the Southern California Gardener Lecture series at The Huntington. Recorded Mar. 5, 2017.

69 MIN2017 MAR 6
Comments
Remarkable New Discoveries from Hummingbird Rescue

A Recipe is More than a Recipe

Long before recipes were shared on the Internet, they were passed among friends and compiled into community cookbooks published as charity fundraisers. Drawing on The Huntington’s Anne M. Cranston American Regional and Charitable Cookbook Collection, food writer Patric Kuh discusses what these shared recipes can tell us, not just about food and community but about the changes that shaped the way Americans cook. Kuh is the author of Finding the Flavors We Lost: From Bread to Bourbon, How Artisans Reclaimed American Food. Recorded Mar. 29, 2017.

52 MIN2017 MAR 6
Comments
A Recipe is More than a Recipe

“The Theater of Many Deeds of Blood”: The Geography of Violence in Frontier Los Angeles

John Mack Faragher, the Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of History and American Studies at Yale University, discusses the spatial pattern of homicide in Southern California in the 19th century. This talk is part of the Billington Lecture series at The Huntington. Recorded Feb. 8, 2017.

60 MIN2017 FEB 9
Comments
“The Theater of Many Deeds of Blood”: The Geography of Violence in Frontier Los Angeles

Desert Plants and the Making of a Fine Press Book

Printmaker and book artist Richard Wagener discusses how the visually striking plants in The Huntington’s Desert Garden have inspired his recent work. A series of his wood engravings are reproduced in a new limited edition, fine-press publication titled Exoticum: Twenty-five Desert Plants from the Huntington Gardens. Recorded Jan. 29, 2017.

45 MIN2017 JAN 30
Comments
Desert Plants and the Making of a Fine Press Book

The Good Garden

Landscape architect Edmund Hollander, author of “The Good Garden,” discusses how the design process for a residential landscape is informed by the interaction of natural site ecology, architectural ecology, and human ecology. Recorded Oct. 2, 2016.

57 MIN2016 OCT 3
Comments
The Good Garden

The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire

Karl Jacoby, professor of history at Columbia University, uses the story of the remarkable Gilded Age border crosser William Ellis to discuss the shifting relationship between the United States and Mexico in the late 19th century. This talk is part of the Billington Lecture series at The Huntington. Recorded Sept. 14, 2016.

44 MIN2016 SEP 16
Comments
The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire

Latest Episodes

Joy Ride

Architect David Martin discusses his book Joy Ride: An Architect’s Journey to Mexico’s Ancient and Colonial Places. A journal of his travels filled with sketches, photographs, and observations, Joy Ride celebrates the timeless sophistication of Mexico’s architecture and offers fresh insights into the country’s history and culture. Recorded July 27, 2017.

47 MIN2017 JUL 28
Comments
Joy Ride

Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

Based on the acclaimed science fiction novel Kindred by Octavia E. Butler, a new graphic adaptation by Damian Duffy and illustrator John Jennings gives fresh form to Butler’s powerful tale of slavery, time travel, and the inexorable pull of the past. Duffy and Jennings discuss the continuing relevance of Butler’s writings and how it has influenced their own work. Recorded July 24, 2017.

33 MIN2017 JUL 25
Comments
Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

Hilary Mantel: “I Met a Man Who Wasn’t There”

Tudor statesman Thomas Cromwell was described by an eminent historian as “not biographable.” Faced with an intractable puzzle, can a novelist do better? Hilary Mantel, two-time Booker Prize–winning author of “Wolf Hall” and its sequel “Bring Up the Bodies,” describes her 10-year effort to pin her compelling and elusive subject to the page. Mantel is currently working on the third book in the trilogy. Her papers are archived at The Huntington. This talk is part of the Ridge Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded May 11, 2017.

51 MIN2017 MAY 12
Comments
Hilary Mantel: “I Met a Man Who Wasn’t There”

The Art of Farming: How a Farmer Sees the Future

David Mas Masumoto, organic farmer and acclaimed author of Epitaph for a Peach and Harvest Son, is joined by his wife, Marcy Masumoto, for a lively talk about life on their Central California farm. Through stories that offer a personal perspective on growing organic crops, the Masumotos share their reflections on the vision required of artisan farmers in today’s food world. This talk is part of the Brody Lecture series at The Huntington. Recorded May 7, 2017.

64 MIN2017 MAY 8
Comments
The Art of Farming: How a Farmer Sees the Future

Remarkable New Discoveries from Hummingbird Rescue

Terry Masear, hummingbird rehabilitator, presents a lecture about nature’s tiny “flying jewels” and the work of the dedicated volunteers of the Los Angeles Hummingbird Rescue. Since its inception in 2007, the group has rehabilitated and released back into the wild 10,000 orphaned or injured birds. Masear also has also written a book on the subject titled Fastest Things on Wings: Rescuing Hummingbirds in Hollywood. This talk is part of the Southern California Gardener Lecture series at The Huntington. Recorded Mar. 5, 2017.

69 MIN2017 MAR 6
Comments
Remarkable New Discoveries from Hummingbird Rescue

A Recipe is More than a Recipe

Long before recipes were shared on the Internet, they were passed among friends and compiled into community cookbooks published as charity fundraisers. Drawing on The Huntington’s Anne M. Cranston American Regional and Charitable Cookbook Collection, food writer Patric Kuh discusses what these shared recipes can tell us, not just about food and community but about the changes that shaped the way Americans cook. Kuh is the author of Finding the Flavors We Lost: From Bread to Bourbon, How Artisans Reclaimed American Food. Recorded Mar. 29, 2017.

52 MIN2017 MAR 6
Comments
A Recipe is More than a Recipe

“The Theater of Many Deeds of Blood”: The Geography of Violence in Frontier Los Angeles

John Mack Faragher, the Howard R. Lamar Professor Emeritus of History and American Studies at Yale University, discusses the spatial pattern of homicide in Southern California in the 19th century. This talk is part of the Billington Lecture series at The Huntington. Recorded Feb. 8, 2017.

60 MIN2017 FEB 9
Comments
“The Theater of Many Deeds of Blood”: The Geography of Violence in Frontier Los Angeles

Desert Plants and the Making of a Fine Press Book

Printmaker and book artist Richard Wagener discusses how the visually striking plants in The Huntington’s Desert Garden have inspired his recent work. A series of his wood engravings are reproduced in a new limited edition, fine-press publication titled Exoticum: Twenty-five Desert Plants from the Huntington Gardens. Recorded Jan. 29, 2017.

45 MIN2017 JAN 30
Comments
Desert Plants and the Making of a Fine Press Book

The Good Garden

Landscape architect Edmund Hollander, author of “The Good Garden,” discusses how the design process for a residential landscape is informed by the interaction of natural site ecology, architectural ecology, and human ecology. Recorded Oct. 2, 2016.

57 MIN2016 OCT 3
Comments
The Good Garden

The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire

Karl Jacoby, professor of history at Columbia University, uses the story of the remarkable Gilded Age border crosser William Ellis to discuss the shifting relationship between the United States and Mexico in the late 19th century. This talk is part of the Billington Lecture series at The Huntington. Recorded Sept. 14, 2016.

44 MIN2016 SEP 16
Comments
The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire
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