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Institute of English Studies

School of Advanced Study, University of London

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Followers
9
Plays
Institute of English Studies
Institute of English Studies

Institute of English Studies

School of Advanced Study, University of London

8
Followers
9
Plays
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Institute of English Studies

Latest Episodes

Book Collecting Seminar - Elisabeth Grass

Book Collecting Seminar - Elisabeth Grass

48 MINSEP 16
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Book Collecting Seminar - Elisabeth Grass

Queer books - an academic, a collector and a librarian discuss the field

Queer books - an academic, an artist, a collector and a librarian discuss the field

88 MINMAY 10
Comments
Queer books - an academic, a collector and a librarian discuss the field

Katherine Mansfield Society Birthday Lecture

Professor Steven Matthews, University of Reading.

71 MIN2018 OCT 13
Comments
Katherine Mansfield Society Birthday Lecture

T.S. Eliot International Summer School - Opening Lecture EDIT1

T.S. Eliot International Summer School

54 MIN2018 SEP 7
Comments
T.S. Eliot International Summer School - Opening Lecture EDIT1

Byron and Wordsworth: Art and Nature

The 2017 London Lecture with Professor Sir Drummond Bone Wordsworth and Byron fell out in a not very dignified way over politics, and there was heavy co-lateral damage in their opinion of each other’s poetry. But there was a fundamental intellectual difference too. Despite his flirtation with Wordsworthean pantheism at Shelley’s behest in 1816, Byron came to believe that moral and existential value could only be human constructs, whereas Wordsworth of course saw these very constructs as the barrier to an existential value inherent in Nature, the perception of which was the necessary ground of moral behaviour. Professor Sir Drummond Bone will use this contrast as a way into reading their poetry, and spend some time specifically on their differing attitudes to city life and the nature of art.

39 MIN2017 NOV 1
Comments
Byron and Wordsworth: Art and Nature

Shifting Ground: Irish Poetry in a Time of Change

Institute of English Studies 2017 John Coffin Memorial Annual Irish Studies Lecture Shifting Ground: Irish Poetry in a Time of Change Professor Eavan Boland In the last hundred years Ireland has seen seismic changes in its social and political worlds. How did these changes come to be reflected or resisted in Irish poetry? Did the identity of the Irish poet shift with the society? Or did Irish poetry remain merely at the edge of change? The Melvin and Bill Land Professor at Stanford University, Eavan Boland has been writer in residence at Trinity College and University College Dublin. She was poet in residence at the National Maternity Hospital during its 1994 Centenary. She has also been the Hurst Professor at Washington University and Regent's Lecturer at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She is on the board of the Irish Arts Council and a member of the Irish Academy of Letters. She is on the advisory board of the International Writers Center at Washington University. ...

60 MIN2017 JUN 28
Comments
Shifting Ground: Irish Poetry in a Time of Change

Wordsworth Trust Annual Lecture 2016 - Romantic Poetry and the Existing State of Things

Institute of English Studies Wordsworth Trust Annual Lecture 2016 Romantic Poetry and the Existing State of Things Professor Michael Rossington (Newcastle University) In November 2015, the only surviving copy of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s Poetical Essay on the Existing State of Things (1811) became the Bodleian Libraries’ 12 millionth book and was published for the first time in over 200 years. It was known to have been published in 1811 but it had been feared lost for ever until this copy was discovered in a private collection in 2006. Poetical Essay is a 172 line revolutionary poem, written as a response to Britain's involvement in the Napoleonic war, and the themes - the abuse of press, dysfunctional political institutions and the global impact of war - remain relevant today. In his talk entitled 'Romantic Poetry and 'the Existing State of Things', Professor Rossington will reflect on the engagement of the poetry of the Romantic period (including that of Wordsworth and Southey) wit...

55 MIN2016 NOV 15
Comments
Wordsworth Trust Annual Lecture 2016 - Romantic Poetry and the Existing State of Things

The influence of Joyce's writing on Iain Sinclair's own style of urban narrative

Institute of English Studies The John Coffin Memorial Readin The influence of Joyce's writing on Iain Sinclair's own style of urban narrative Iain Sinclair In association with the conference Anniversary Joyce: XXV International James Joyce Symposium

57 MIN2016 JUN 16
Comments
The influence of Joyce's writing on Iain Sinclair's own style of urban narrative

Alice in Cableland

Institute of English Studies Alice in Cableland Anne Chapman (PhD Candidate, KCL) Caroline Arscott (Professor of Art History, The Courtauld Institute of Art) Clare Pettitt (Professor of Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture, KCL) Natalie Hume (PhD Candidate, The Courtauld Institute of Art) Cassie Newland (Postdoctoral Researcher, KCL) The Media History seminar & Nineteenth Century Studies seminar are pleased to be holding a special joint session titled “Alice in Cableland.” 2016 sees the 150th anniversaries of the successful laying of the Atlantic Cable and the publication of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. The team on the AHRC-funded project “Scrambled Messages: The Telegraphic Imaginary 1857-1900” will be thinking about the issues involved in coding, cabling and communications technologies through the medium of John Tenniel's illustrations of Carroll's classic. Media History and Nineteenth Century Studies Joint Seminar

64 MIN2016 MAY 12
Comments
Alice in Cableland

Reading the World: Challenging the Dynamics of Canon Formations - Keynote Address

Institute of English Studies Reading the World: Challenging the Dynamics of Canon Formations Keynote Address Co-chairs: Professor Rose Levinson (PhD) Professor Francesca Orsini (PhD) Finding words: The Shelter of Stories in Time of War Marina Warner Novelist, short story writer, cultural historian, critic, mythographer and chair of the judges for the 2015 Man Booker International Prize will keynote the conference. Known for her many non-fiction works relating to feminism and to myth, she is a contributing editor at the London Review of Books. Her books include Alone for All Her Sex, Monuments and Maidens and Stranger Magic, for which she won the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism. Her talk will reflect her profound engagement with literary shifts in our own complex, troubled time. "There is nothing mysterious or natural about authority. It is formed, irradiated, disseminated... it has status, it establishes canons of taste and value; it is virtually indistinguisha...

50 MIN2015 DEC 3
Comments
Reading the World: Challenging the Dynamics of Canon Formations - Keynote Address

Latest Episodes

Book Collecting Seminar - Elisabeth Grass

Book Collecting Seminar - Elisabeth Grass

48 MINSEP 16
Comments
Book Collecting Seminar - Elisabeth Grass

Queer books - an academic, a collector and a librarian discuss the field

Queer books - an academic, an artist, a collector and a librarian discuss the field

88 MINMAY 10
Comments
Queer books - an academic, a collector and a librarian discuss the field

Katherine Mansfield Society Birthday Lecture

Professor Steven Matthews, University of Reading.

71 MIN2018 OCT 13
Comments
Katherine Mansfield Society Birthday Lecture

T.S. Eliot International Summer School - Opening Lecture EDIT1

T.S. Eliot International Summer School

54 MIN2018 SEP 7
Comments
T.S. Eliot International Summer School - Opening Lecture EDIT1

Byron and Wordsworth: Art and Nature

The 2017 London Lecture with Professor Sir Drummond Bone Wordsworth and Byron fell out in a not very dignified way over politics, and there was heavy co-lateral damage in their opinion of each other’s poetry. But there was a fundamental intellectual difference too. Despite his flirtation with Wordsworthean pantheism at Shelley’s behest in 1816, Byron came to believe that moral and existential value could only be human constructs, whereas Wordsworth of course saw these very constructs as the barrier to an existential value inherent in Nature, the perception of which was the necessary ground of moral behaviour. Professor Sir Drummond Bone will use this contrast as a way into reading their poetry, and spend some time specifically on their differing attitudes to city life and the nature of art.

39 MIN2017 NOV 1
Comments
Byron and Wordsworth: Art and Nature

Shifting Ground: Irish Poetry in a Time of Change

Institute of English Studies 2017 John Coffin Memorial Annual Irish Studies Lecture Shifting Ground: Irish Poetry in a Time of Change Professor Eavan Boland In the last hundred years Ireland has seen seismic changes in its social and political worlds. How did these changes come to be reflected or resisted in Irish poetry? Did the identity of the Irish poet shift with the society? Or did Irish poetry remain merely at the edge of change? The Melvin and Bill Land Professor at Stanford University, Eavan Boland has been writer in residence at Trinity College and University College Dublin. She was poet in residence at the National Maternity Hospital during its 1994 Centenary. She has also been the Hurst Professor at Washington University and Regent's Lecturer at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She is on the board of the Irish Arts Council and a member of the Irish Academy of Letters. She is on the advisory board of the International Writers Center at Washington University. ...

60 MIN2017 JUN 28
Comments
Shifting Ground: Irish Poetry in a Time of Change

Wordsworth Trust Annual Lecture 2016 - Romantic Poetry and the Existing State of Things

Institute of English Studies Wordsworth Trust Annual Lecture 2016 Romantic Poetry and the Existing State of Things Professor Michael Rossington (Newcastle University) In November 2015, the only surviving copy of Percy Bysshe Shelley’s Poetical Essay on the Existing State of Things (1811) became the Bodleian Libraries’ 12 millionth book and was published for the first time in over 200 years. It was known to have been published in 1811 but it had been feared lost for ever until this copy was discovered in a private collection in 2006. Poetical Essay is a 172 line revolutionary poem, written as a response to Britain's involvement in the Napoleonic war, and the themes - the abuse of press, dysfunctional political institutions and the global impact of war - remain relevant today. In his talk entitled 'Romantic Poetry and 'the Existing State of Things', Professor Rossington will reflect on the engagement of the poetry of the Romantic period (including that of Wordsworth and Southey) wit...

55 MIN2016 NOV 15
Comments
Wordsworth Trust Annual Lecture 2016 - Romantic Poetry and the Existing State of Things

The influence of Joyce's writing on Iain Sinclair's own style of urban narrative

Institute of English Studies The John Coffin Memorial Readin The influence of Joyce's writing on Iain Sinclair's own style of urban narrative Iain Sinclair In association with the conference Anniversary Joyce: XXV International James Joyce Symposium

57 MIN2016 JUN 16
Comments
The influence of Joyce's writing on Iain Sinclair's own style of urban narrative

Alice in Cableland

Institute of English Studies Alice in Cableland Anne Chapman (PhD Candidate, KCL) Caroline Arscott (Professor of Art History, The Courtauld Institute of Art) Clare Pettitt (Professor of Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture, KCL) Natalie Hume (PhD Candidate, The Courtauld Institute of Art) Cassie Newland (Postdoctoral Researcher, KCL) The Media History seminar & Nineteenth Century Studies seminar are pleased to be holding a special joint session titled “Alice in Cableland.” 2016 sees the 150th anniversaries of the successful laying of the Atlantic Cable and the publication of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland. The team on the AHRC-funded project “Scrambled Messages: The Telegraphic Imaginary 1857-1900” will be thinking about the issues involved in coding, cabling and communications technologies through the medium of John Tenniel's illustrations of Carroll's classic. Media History and Nineteenth Century Studies Joint Seminar

64 MIN2016 MAY 12
Comments
Alice in Cableland

Reading the World: Challenging the Dynamics of Canon Formations - Keynote Address

Institute of English Studies Reading the World: Challenging the Dynamics of Canon Formations Keynote Address Co-chairs: Professor Rose Levinson (PhD) Professor Francesca Orsini (PhD) Finding words: The Shelter of Stories in Time of War Marina Warner Novelist, short story writer, cultural historian, critic, mythographer and chair of the judges for the 2015 Man Booker International Prize will keynote the conference. Known for her many non-fiction works relating to feminism and to myth, she is a contributing editor at the London Review of Books. Her books include Alone for All Her Sex, Monuments and Maidens and Stranger Magic, for which she won the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism. Her talk will reflect her profound engagement with literary shifts in our own complex, troubled time. "There is nothing mysterious or natural about authority. It is formed, irradiated, disseminated... it has status, it establishes canons of taste and value; it is virtually indistinguisha...

50 MIN2015 DEC 3
Comments
Reading the World: Challenging the Dynamics of Canon Formations - Keynote Address