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Legacy: the Artists Behind the Legends

Whiskey Emerson

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Legacy: the Artists Behind the Legends
Legacy: the Artists Behind the Legends

Legacy: the Artists Behind the Legends

Whiskey Emerson

0
Followers
24
Plays
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About Us

Have you ever read a novel, short story, poem, or narrative and then found yourself wondering about it's creator, their backstory, and what type of person could construct the piece of literature in your hands? ​Well, I know I have.​Being an avid book worm and all around knowledge-seeking nerd, I discovered one of my favorite things to do after completing either a series or a book that made me question life, reality, or morality as a whole, was to figure out who it was that crafted such a work. Everyone from the bizarre and twisted universe of Thompson to the devout and classic writings of Milton, Legacy investigates who these writers were and what sort of events impacted their lives and their writing, all to give you a bigger picture of context for your library. ​Just a forewarning: I am not choosing artists who had what I would deem as relatively ordinary existences. We are diving into the personal lives of people who I think are borderline on the crazy train, with experiences and stories that will shock you, awe you, make you laugh, and most importantly, maybe grasp a better understanding of what inspired their literature.

Latest Episodes

Flannery O'Connor

EMary Flannery O’Connor was an American short story writer, essayist, and novelist, active throughout the first half of the 20th century. Born in Savannah, GA, Flannery’s original writing dreams were to become a journalist, yet that was squashed due to her shy personality and ridiculously heavy southern draw, and therefore, the arena of fiction was where she optimized her craft. O’Connor led a too short life, and her career is often overlooked due to the fact that its focus centers around the idea of Christian realism; Flannery was a devout Roman Catholic, and at the heart of each one of her short stories is a moment where the character is charged with the decision of choosing to accept or reject grace (aka GOD). In most circumstances, she would use relatively grotesque and violent scenes to show this moment, because in her own opinion, accepting grace is difficult and painful. “All human nature vigorously resists grace because grace changes us and the change is painful.” In grand total, Flannery wrote 2 novels, 31 short stories, and well over 100 book reviews. She never married nor had children, probably due to an early diagnosis of lupus, a disease she suffered with for 12 years before passing away at the very young age of 39, an illness her father had also succumbed to when she was a child. This week’s episode is going to be a tad shorter, mainly as a consequence of Flannery’s short yet striking career, and while normally on the podcast I might not cover an artist with so little meat on the bones, O’Connor has been one of the MOST requested writers in the last two and a half years for the podcast, so we are diving in anyway. We will focus on her life, a little on her writing to better understand the context of her perspectives, and of course, celebrate the incredible contributions Flannery made to the literary world.HAPPY MONDAY Y’ALL!

29 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Flannery O'Connor

Walt Whitman

EWalter Whitman was an American poet, essayist, and journalist, active throughout the mid 19th century, best known for his repeatedly revised work, Leaves of Grass, and considered to be a latter-day successor to Homer, Virgil, Dante, and Shakespeare (of whom he is not a fan, btw). Whitman was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both perspectives into his writing, though his work was considered to be somewhat controversial (I am sorry, VERY controversial – it was reviewed by some as obscene) due to its overt sensuality. Throughout his life, Whitman worked as a journalist, a government clerk, and a teacher, spending the majority of his life in Brooklyn, New York. As a humanist, Walt volunteered much of his time during the Civil War, taking care of Confederate and Union soldiers alike who were wounded in the hospitals. What I find so amazing about Whitman is that originally in 1855, he published Leaves of Grass with his own money, with the sheer desire to reach out to the common person and share his art with the world, and oddly enough, even as his fame grew on a global scale, Whitman was hugely popular in England as a representation of American culture. Leaves of Grass remained Whitman’s masterpiece, and he continued to edit, add, and revise editions until the year of his death in 1892. To this day, it is still one of the most well-known, well-loved, and enduring works of poetry in the canon. As Ezra Pound once claimed Whitman to be “America’s poet … he is America”, Walt strove to prove himself to be just that. His external appearance was specially crafted to be a caricature of the era of his life, regardless of the controversy of his sexuality. So just who was Walt Whitman? Let’s find out together on this week’s episode of Legacy: the Artists Behind the Legends, covering the life of legendary American writer, Walt Whitman.

31 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Walt Whitman

H.G. Wells

EHerbert George Wells was an English novelist, teacher, historian, and journalist active during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was a prolific writer in various genres and considered to be one of the main pioneers of the science fiction genre alongside Jules Verne, writing more than 100 books during his six decade career. Additionally, Wells wrote short stories and works of social commentary, history, satire, biography, and autobiography, as well as two books on recreational war games. Throughout his life, Wells was considered a prominent forward-thinking, and in moments prophetic, social critic, and he devoted much of his literary talent to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. Wells was a futurist and an outspoken socialist who empathized with pacifism, and he foresaw the advent of aircraft, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television, and quite possibly even the internet. Throughout his career, he was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature four times, a man Winston Churchill considered a close friend, and one of the most highly respected minds of his era. But just who was HG Wells when he wasn’t writing bestsellers? Well, he was a man who founded the Diabetic Association in the UK after suffering from diabetes himself; he is on the cover of SGT Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, and he enjoyed his freedoms of all sorts, particularly when it came to his love life. Are you ready to learn all about the incredible life of HG Wells? Let’s get season 3, episode 1 of Legacy: the artists behind the legends, off and rolling!

34 MIN3 w ago
Comments
H.G. Wells

Season 3 Preview

EWE ARE BACK FOR SEASON 3!

5 MINSEP 13
Comments
Season 3 Preview

Aldous Huxley

EAldous Leonard Huxley was a 20th century British writer and philosopher probably best known for his 1932 novel Brave New World, though in total Huxley would write over fifty nonfiction and fiction works throughout his life, as well as collections of essays, narratives, and poetry. By the end of his career, Huxley was considered one of the foremost intellectuals of his time, and as both a humanist and a pacifist, his ideas and writing had an immense impact on society, particularly when it came to mysticism and universalism. By his early twenties, Huxley established himself as a successful writer and satirist, and he was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature seven times, and was additionally made the Companion of Literature by the Royal Society of Literature in 1962. He moved to LA in the later 1930s where he led an incredibly prosperous occupation as a screenwriter, and of course I will most definitely not be leaving out Huxley’s experimentation with drugs, his attachments to ...

33 MINAPR 2
Comments
Aldous Huxley

Stieg Larsson

EKarl Stig Erland Larsson, or as we all know him, Stieg Larsson, was a Swedish journalist, activist, and writer best known for his Millennium trilogy of crime novels following the life of Lisbeth Salander and Mikel Blomkvist. Sadly for Stieg, he passed away only just after completing the third installment of his Millennium trilogy, The Girl Who Kicks the Hornet’s Nest. Posthumously, however, this series has become an international sensation, inspiring films on both sides of the Atlantic as well as a continuation of the series by David Lagercrantz, with the sixth novel to be released in September 2019. Still, what you might not know about Mr. Larsson is that he, in fact, led a very parallel life path to that of his signature character, Mr. Kalle Blomkvist. He spent his life devoted to a socialist cause, fighting as an independent researcher of right-wing extremism within the depths of Swedish government. Stieg was additionally a staunch feminist after witnessing a horrifying assault ...

36 MINMAR 25
Comments
Stieg Larsson

Michael Crichton

EJohn Michael Crichton was an American author, screenwriter, producer, film director, certified medical doctor, and television creator active through the late 20th and early 21st centuries, and his books alone have sold over 200 million copies worldwide in 38 languages with over a dozen adapted into films. And yes, you heard me right. Crichton was a licensed medical doctor out of Harvard Medical School, just to give you a frame of reference for how intelligent he was. His novel writing took off while he was still in Medical School with Crichton hoping the sales of a few books might help pay for his education. Instead, Crichton saw huge commercial success and decided writing was the passion he wished to pursue over medicine. From there, it was a steady stream of incredible and groundbreaking action-adventure stories that focused heavily on technology and science, a path that led him to unbelievable success with his novels, in film, and on television. But who was Michael Crichton benea...

30 MINMAR 10
Comments
Michael Crichton

Ray Bradbury

ERay Douglas Bradbury was an American novelist, short story writer, and screenwriter active through the majority of the 19th and well into the early years of the 20th century. Best known for his remarkable science fiction tale, Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury actually somewhat resented being described as a strictly science fiction author, believing himself to instead be a fantasy writer, depicting visions and myths of the unreal versus the real. Though this had no effect whatsoever on his reputation – Bradbury was one of the most celebrated 20th and 21st century writers, receiving numerous awards including a 2007 Pulitzer Citation, and he was the man the New York Times claimed to be “the writer most responsible for bringing modern science fiction into the literary mainstream.” His 91 years were additionally spent writing screenplays, television scripts, and pieces for the stage, and many of his works were adapted to comic books, television, and films over the years. Still, with such an i...

34 MINMAR 3
Comments
Ray Bradbury

Maya Angelou

EMarguerite Annie Johnson, or as we know her Maya Angelou, was an acclaimed American poet, storyteller, activist, and autobiographer, as well as a singer, dancer, actress, composer, Hollywood’s first black female director, AND civil rights activist alongside both Martin Luther King, Jr and Malcolm X. Her most renowned work, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”, was published in 1969 and put Angelou on an international platform as an artist and a voice for African Americans and women with her push to raise the moral standards of living. Though Maya’s writing and influence brought her respect and recognition, she was extremely private with her personal life, particularly when it came to her marriages (we assume there were two) and her son, Guy. But what can I say about Maya? She was a lover of sherry, a woman who worked her ass off to support her son, a survivor of sexual assault and abuse, and a woman who never gave up no matter what obstacles life threw her way. As linguist John McW...

35 MINFEB 14
Comments
Maya Angelou

Thomas Hardy

EThomas Hardy was an English novelist and poet active from the 19th to the early 20th century, best known for works such as Jude the Obscure and Far From the Maddening Crowd. Now, I know when we hear words like England and 19th century, we all start thinking the same thing – more super tight collars of the Victorian Era. Hardy, however, was a Victorian realist much like that of George Eliot, who we’ve covered previously on the podcast, and he was pretty damn critical of the majority of Victorian society, particularly when it came to those living in the more rural areas in the country of Britain. It was these areas that truly inspired Hardy – his novels center on somewhat tragic characters struggling with social circumstances and passions, and most of whom live in the semi-fictional region of Wessex, meant to mirror his native land of South West England. His initial fame sparked from his highly successful novels, though Hardy personally considered himself more of a poet in spite of...

32 MINFEB 6
Comments
Thomas Hardy

Latest Episodes

Flannery O'Connor

EMary Flannery O’Connor was an American short story writer, essayist, and novelist, active throughout the first half of the 20th century. Born in Savannah, GA, Flannery’s original writing dreams were to become a journalist, yet that was squashed due to her shy personality and ridiculously heavy southern draw, and therefore, the arena of fiction was where she optimized her craft. O’Connor led a too short life, and her career is often overlooked due to the fact that its focus centers around the idea of Christian realism; Flannery was a devout Roman Catholic, and at the heart of each one of her short stories is a moment where the character is charged with the decision of choosing to accept or reject grace (aka GOD). In most circumstances, she would use relatively grotesque and violent scenes to show this moment, because in her own opinion, accepting grace is difficult and painful. “All human nature vigorously resists grace because grace changes us and the change is painful.” In grand total, Flannery wrote 2 novels, 31 short stories, and well over 100 book reviews. She never married nor had children, probably due to an early diagnosis of lupus, a disease she suffered with for 12 years before passing away at the very young age of 39, an illness her father had also succumbed to when she was a child. This week’s episode is going to be a tad shorter, mainly as a consequence of Flannery’s short yet striking career, and while normally on the podcast I might not cover an artist with so little meat on the bones, O’Connor has been one of the MOST requested writers in the last two and a half years for the podcast, so we are diving in anyway. We will focus on her life, a little on her writing to better understand the context of her perspectives, and of course, celebrate the incredible contributions Flannery made to the literary world.HAPPY MONDAY Y’ALL!

29 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Flannery O'Connor

Walt Whitman

EWalter Whitman was an American poet, essayist, and journalist, active throughout the mid 19th century, best known for his repeatedly revised work, Leaves of Grass, and considered to be a latter-day successor to Homer, Virgil, Dante, and Shakespeare (of whom he is not a fan, btw). Whitman was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both perspectives into his writing, though his work was considered to be somewhat controversial (I am sorry, VERY controversial – it was reviewed by some as obscene) due to its overt sensuality. Throughout his life, Whitman worked as a journalist, a government clerk, and a teacher, spending the majority of his life in Brooklyn, New York. As a humanist, Walt volunteered much of his time during the Civil War, taking care of Confederate and Union soldiers alike who were wounded in the hospitals. What I find so amazing about Whitman is that originally in 1855, he published Leaves of Grass with his own money, with the sheer desire to reach out to the common person and share his art with the world, and oddly enough, even as his fame grew on a global scale, Whitman was hugely popular in England as a representation of American culture. Leaves of Grass remained Whitman’s masterpiece, and he continued to edit, add, and revise editions until the year of his death in 1892. To this day, it is still one of the most well-known, well-loved, and enduring works of poetry in the canon. As Ezra Pound once claimed Whitman to be “America’s poet … he is America”, Walt strove to prove himself to be just that. His external appearance was specially crafted to be a caricature of the era of his life, regardless of the controversy of his sexuality. So just who was Walt Whitman? Let’s find out together on this week’s episode of Legacy: the Artists Behind the Legends, covering the life of legendary American writer, Walt Whitman.

31 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Walt Whitman

H.G. Wells

EHerbert George Wells was an English novelist, teacher, historian, and journalist active during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He was a prolific writer in various genres and considered to be one of the main pioneers of the science fiction genre alongside Jules Verne, writing more than 100 books during his six decade career. Additionally, Wells wrote short stories and works of social commentary, history, satire, biography, and autobiography, as well as two books on recreational war games. Throughout his life, Wells was considered a prominent forward-thinking, and in moments prophetic, social critic, and he devoted much of his literary talent to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. Wells was a futurist and an outspoken socialist who empathized with pacifism, and he foresaw the advent of aircraft, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television, and quite possibly even the internet. Throughout his career, he was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature four times, a man Winston Churchill considered a close friend, and one of the most highly respected minds of his era. But just who was HG Wells when he wasn’t writing bestsellers? Well, he was a man who founded the Diabetic Association in the UK after suffering from diabetes himself; he is on the cover of SGT Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, and he enjoyed his freedoms of all sorts, particularly when it came to his love life. Are you ready to learn all about the incredible life of HG Wells? Let’s get season 3, episode 1 of Legacy: the artists behind the legends, off and rolling!

34 MIN3 w ago
Comments
H.G. Wells

Season 3 Preview

EWE ARE BACK FOR SEASON 3!

5 MINSEP 13
Comments
Season 3 Preview

Aldous Huxley

EAldous Leonard Huxley was a 20th century British writer and philosopher probably best known for his 1932 novel Brave New World, though in total Huxley would write over fifty nonfiction and fiction works throughout his life, as well as collections of essays, narratives, and poetry. By the end of his career, Huxley was considered one of the foremost intellectuals of his time, and as both a humanist and a pacifist, his ideas and writing had an immense impact on society, particularly when it came to mysticism and universalism. By his early twenties, Huxley established himself as a successful writer and satirist, and he was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature seven times, and was additionally made the Companion of Literature by the Royal Society of Literature in 1962. He moved to LA in the later 1930s where he led an incredibly prosperous occupation as a screenwriter, and of course I will most definitely not be leaving out Huxley’s experimentation with drugs, his attachments to ...

33 MINAPR 2
Comments
Aldous Huxley

Stieg Larsson

EKarl Stig Erland Larsson, or as we all know him, Stieg Larsson, was a Swedish journalist, activist, and writer best known for his Millennium trilogy of crime novels following the life of Lisbeth Salander and Mikel Blomkvist. Sadly for Stieg, he passed away only just after completing the third installment of his Millennium trilogy, The Girl Who Kicks the Hornet’s Nest. Posthumously, however, this series has become an international sensation, inspiring films on both sides of the Atlantic as well as a continuation of the series by David Lagercrantz, with the sixth novel to be released in September 2019. Still, what you might not know about Mr. Larsson is that he, in fact, led a very parallel life path to that of his signature character, Mr. Kalle Blomkvist. He spent his life devoted to a socialist cause, fighting as an independent researcher of right-wing extremism within the depths of Swedish government. Stieg was additionally a staunch feminist after witnessing a horrifying assault ...

36 MINMAR 25
Comments
Stieg Larsson

Michael Crichton

EJohn Michael Crichton was an American author, screenwriter, producer, film director, certified medical doctor, and television creator active through the late 20th and early 21st centuries, and his books alone have sold over 200 million copies worldwide in 38 languages with over a dozen adapted into films. And yes, you heard me right. Crichton was a licensed medical doctor out of Harvard Medical School, just to give you a frame of reference for how intelligent he was. His novel writing took off while he was still in Medical School with Crichton hoping the sales of a few books might help pay for his education. Instead, Crichton saw huge commercial success and decided writing was the passion he wished to pursue over medicine. From there, it was a steady stream of incredible and groundbreaking action-adventure stories that focused heavily on technology and science, a path that led him to unbelievable success with his novels, in film, and on television. But who was Michael Crichton benea...

30 MINMAR 10
Comments
Michael Crichton

Ray Bradbury

ERay Douglas Bradbury was an American novelist, short story writer, and screenwriter active through the majority of the 19th and well into the early years of the 20th century. Best known for his remarkable science fiction tale, Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury actually somewhat resented being described as a strictly science fiction author, believing himself to instead be a fantasy writer, depicting visions and myths of the unreal versus the real. Though this had no effect whatsoever on his reputation – Bradbury was one of the most celebrated 20th and 21st century writers, receiving numerous awards including a 2007 Pulitzer Citation, and he was the man the New York Times claimed to be “the writer most responsible for bringing modern science fiction into the literary mainstream.” His 91 years were additionally spent writing screenplays, television scripts, and pieces for the stage, and many of his works were adapted to comic books, television, and films over the years. Still, with such an i...

34 MINMAR 3
Comments
Ray Bradbury

Maya Angelou

EMarguerite Annie Johnson, or as we know her Maya Angelou, was an acclaimed American poet, storyteller, activist, and autobiographer, as well as a singer, dancer, actress, composer, Hollywood’s first black female director, AND civil rights activist alongside both Martin Luther King, Jr and Malcolm X. Her most renowned work, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”, was published in 1969 and put Angelou on an international platform as an artist and a voice for African Americans and women with her push to raise the moral standards of living. Though Maya’s writing and influence brought her respect and recognition, she was extremely private with her personal life, particularly when it came to her marriages (we assume there were two) and her son, Guy. But what can I say about Maya? She was a lover of sherry, a woman who worked her ass off to support her son, a survivor of sexual assault and abuse, and a woman who never gave up no matter what obstacles life threw her way. As linguist John McW...

35 MINFEB 14
Comments
Maya Angelou

Thomas Hardy

EThomas Hardy was an English novelist and poet active from the 19th to the early 20th century, best known for works such as Jude the Obscure and Far From the Maddening Crowd. Now, I know when we hear words like England and 19th century, we all start thinking the same thing – more super tight collars of the Victorian Era. Hardy, however, was a Victorian realist much like that of George Eliot, who we’ve covered previously on the podcast, and he was pretty damn critical of the majority of Victorian society, particularly when it came to those living in the more rural areas in the country of Britain. It was these areas that truly inspired Hardy – his novels center on somewhat tragic characters struggling with social circumstances and passions, and most of whom live in the semi-fictional region of Wessex, meant to mirror his native land of South West England. His initial fame sparked from his highly successful novels, though Hardy personally considered himself more of a poet in spite of...

32 MINFEB 6
Comments
Thomas Hardy