title

Pratchat

Splendid Chaps Productions

5
Followers
2
Plays
Pratchat
Pratchat

Pratchat

Splendid Chaps Productions

5
Followers
2
Plays
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About Us

A Terry Pratchett book club podcast.

Latest Episodes

The Long Dark Mr Teatime of the Soul

EIn episode 26, Michael Williams of The Wheeler Centre joins Liz and Ben to get into the holiday spirit with the very Christmassy 1996 Discworld novel Hogfather. It's Hogswatch, and the Assassins Guild of Ankh-Morpork has accepted a very unusual assignment, and Lord Downey has given it to the very unusual assassin Mr Teatime. But who would want to kill the Hogfather? And how would you even accomplish such a thing? As Death fills in for the Fat Man delivering presents, his granddaughter Susan is reluctantly drawn to investigate, teaming up with the newly created Oh God of Hangovers. But much more than the joy of children is at stake - for without the Hogfather, will the sun even rise tomorrow? Hogfather brings to life a character previously mentioned only in passing rather paradoxically by replacing him with Death, who gets a sort of working holiday. It's our second and final adventure with Susan, and the wizards get heavily involved - as does their arcane thinking machine Hex. It's full of not-quite-Christmas cheer, black humour, true pathos and a pure expression of many of Terry's most deeply held beliefs. Could this be the ultimate story of Christmas? Do its themes of belief and justice hit the mark? And what kind of creature would you call into existence if there were excess belief sloshing around? Use the hashtag #Pratchat26 on social media to join the conversation and have your say! Guest Michael Williams is the Director of the Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas in Melbourne. They have a year-round program of talks, interviews, panel discussions, podcasts and writing. Find out more about what's happening at @wheelercentre on Twitter and Instagram, or check out videos of past talks on YouTube. You'll find all the Wheeler Centre's upcoming events at wheelercentre.com, as well as a collection of Michael's writings and events. The Sci-Fight comedy debate over the topic "Santa is Real" features a great line-up of comedians and scientists, including previous Pratchat guest Nate Byrne (episode 24). It's on at Howler in Brunswick on Thursday December 12, 2019. Details and tickets via scifight.com.au. Next month we continue through the Discworld with 1997's Jingo, a tale of nationalism, war, racism and greed, which also has a submarine in it. We'll be recording in the week or so before Hogswa- er, Christmas, so get your questions in via social media using the hashtag #Pratchat27. You'll find the full notes and errata for this episode on our web site. Want to make sure we get through every Pratchett book? You can support Pratchat for as little as $2 a month and get subscriber bonuses, like the exclusive bonus podcast Ook Club!

130 MIN15 h ago
Comments
The Long Dark Mr Teatime of the Soul

The Pratchatters' Guide to the Night Terrace

EIn this bonus mini-episode of Pratchat, Liz asks Ben about Night Terrace, the time travel radio comedy series from Splendid Chaps Productions! Get the lowdown on the characters, hear some excerpts, and find out how or if it connects to the Discworld. Season three of the show is crowdfunding right now; the campaign ends very soon, so get in before November 22 if you want to help it get made!

9 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Pratchatters' Guide to the Night Terrace

Eskist Attitudes

EIn episode 25, Elizabeth, Ben and Noongar writer and poet Claire G. Coleman go back to the early days of the Discworld to Granny Weatherwax's debut in 1986's Equal Rites. Drum Billet, wizard, travels to the village of Bad Ass high in the Ramtop mountains, where at the moment of his death he hands over his wizard's staff to the newborn eighth son of an eighth son. But Eskarina Smith isn't the eighth son of anyone, and it falls to the witch Granny Weatherwax to watch over her. As Esk comes into her powers, Granny realises she needs training in the ways of wizardry lest she pose a danger to everyone around her. So the pair set off to distant Ankh-Morpork on a quest to enrol Esk as the first ever female student of Unseen University... Equal Rites is a book of contradictions: it doesn't feel quite like the Discworld, but it's vital and beautifully written. It's not full of jokes or footnotes, but is consistently funny. And even after more than thirty years, it feels entirely relevant. Do you recognise Esk's struggle? Did Granny feel like Granny yet? And why did it take so long for Pratchett to revisit some of these characters? Use the hashtag #Pratchat25 on social media to join the conversation and tell us your thoughts! Guest Claire G. Coleman's novels are the multi-award winning Terra Nullius, and her new work The Old Lie. She also writes short fiction, poetry and non-fiction and has been published in numerous publications. You can find her on Twitter and Instagram as @clairegcoleman, or visit her web site, clairegcoleman.com, for more info. Next month we're joined by the Director of the Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas, Michael Williams, as we celebrate Hogswatch by discussing - what else? - Hogfather!

127 MINNOV 8
Comments
Eskist Attitudes

Arsenic and Old Clays

EIn episode 24, weather presenter, meteorologist and science communicator Nate Byrne joins Elizabeth and Ben for a Discworld tale of murder, golems and nobility in 1996's Feet of Clay. Two old men have been murdered in Ankh-Morpork, but they're not the worst of Commander Vimes' woes. His best Sergeant is six weeks from retirement; his worst Corporal might be the Earl of Ankh; his newest recruit is an alchemist with some pretty strange ideas for a dwarf; and someone has poisoned the Patrician, though he's damned if he can figure out how. And somehow, the golems are involved... Content note: this episode contains brief discussion of (fictional) suicide. If you or anyone you know needs help, use the Wikipedia list of crisis lines to find one local to you. Following on from Men at Arms (from way back in episode one!), Feet of Clay evolves the Watch - and its leader - even further, and introduces some of Pratchett's most memorable supporting characters: Cheery Littlebottom, Wee Mad Arthur and Dorfl the golem. It gets a bit deep on questions of artificial life, gender expression and identity, and is a heck of a mystery novel to boot. Did you figure out "whatdunnit"? Who's your favourite new character? And what do you think the Pratchat coat of arms and motto should be? Use the hashtag #Pratchat24 on social media to join the conversation and let us know what you think! PS - we recorded this just before the casting announcements for The Watch television series, so don't be disappointed when they don't come up! We'll find a place to discuss them in the near future.

134 MINOCT 8
Comments
Arsenic and Old Clays

The Music of the Nitt

EFor episode 23, Elizabeth and Ben are joined by teacher, opera singer and Dungeon Master Myf Coghill on a trip to Ankh-Morpork's opera house in 1994's Discworld novel of witches, phantoms and experimental cookery: Maskerade! Nanny Ogg has a problem on her hands: she's stuck in a coven with Granny Weatherwax without a third witch. She decides young Agnes Nitt - last seen dabbling in the craft while wearing black lace and calling herself "Perdita" - is just the person to fill the position, but Agnes has run off to Ankh-Morpork to join the opera. Strange things are afoot behind the curtains and greasepaint: a ghost watches their every move, and can't seem to decide if he wants to improve things or kill people... Pratchett delves into a world hitherto unknown to him and takes Granny and Nanny to the big city for their penultimate starring adventure, heavily influenced by The Phantom of the Opera. We learn a lot about opera, Andrew Lloyd Webber and the world of publishing, and delve into Pratchett's treatment of Agnes, a beloved character whose unflattering portrayal was the subject of many questions and comments. So many in fact that this episode could barely be contained - it's a long one, but still jam-packed! Did Maskerade bring out the opera fan in you? Do you think Agnes deserved better? And despite being a bit of a downer, is this one of the best Discworld books we've discussed so far? Use the hashtag #Pratchat23 on social media to join the conversation and let us know what you think! We're staying in Ankh-Morpork for Feet of Clay in October before heading back in time to revisit the origins of Granny Weatherwax in November with Equal Rites. And we have something very suitable planned for December! Plus our subscriber-only podcast, Ook Club, has launched - episodes are available to subscribers at any level, so support us for as little as $2 a month to check it out. You'll find all the details on our Support Us page.

138 MINSEP 8
Comments
The Music of the Nitt

The Cat in the Prat

EEpisode 22 features Elizabeth, Ben and resident Pratcat Asimov for a look at one of Pratchett's oddest books: 1989's humorous examination of all things feline, The Unadulterated Cat. Cats these days just aren't a patch on the ones you used to get: untameable aloof outdoor beasts who are more likely to trap you in a neighbours' house with a broken leg (long story) than to sit nicely on your lap and purr. The Campaign for Real Cats has had enough of modern, "fizzy keg" cats, with their bows and bells and posing. This is the Campaign's guide to identifying, understanding and appreciating honest-to-Bastet real cats. Pratchett teams up with cartoonist and illustrator Gray Jolliffe to give us a tongue-firm-in-durry-cheek rundown of the world of cats in one of his rare non-fiction works. It's the kind of thing you buy the cat lover in your life for Christmas, full of chapters detailing the types of cats, their names, the games they play and "advice" on how to deal with them. Are you a cat lover? Did this ring true for you? We'd love to hear from you - and to hear your cat stories, and any real cats you've identified in fiction! Use the hashtag #Pratchat22 on social media to join the conversation.

76 MINAUG 8
Comments
The Cat in the Prat

Memoirs of Agatea

ETwenty-one today! In this episode, Elizabeth and Ben are joined by David Ryding of Melbourne UNESCO City of Literature as we rejoin Rincewind and some of his old friends in the 17th Discworld novel: 1994's Interesting Times. Rincewind, the worst student Unseen University ever had, has been quite literally to hell and back. But when a summons arrives in Ankh-Morpork requesting the presence of "the Great Wizzard", his old faculty bring him home, then send him to the far-flung Agatean Empire. All is not well on the Counterweight Continent: rebels are (gently) questioning centuries of enforced order, inspired by the revolutionary pamphlet "What I Did on My Holidays". The ruthless Lord Hong plots to change the Empire forever. The walls have failed to keep out a horde of barbarian invaders - seven of them, in fact. And it's about to be visited by a very special kind of butterfly... Pratchett revisits characters from his first Discworld novels, as Rincewind is reunited with Cohen the Barbarian in Twoflower's homeland. But in 2019, twenty-five years after it was first published, his depiction of a comic fantasy Asia leaves a bit to be desired. There's plenty going on, and some stirring speeches, but it's also hard to ignore that nearly all the main characters are white folks "saving" a nation inspired by real-world Asian countries from itself. Is there a clear message in the book? How does this sit on the evolution of Pratchett's work from parody to satire? And were you glad to see such old favourite characters return, or could you have done without them? We'd love to hear from you! Use the hashtag #Pratchat21 on social media to join the conversation.

121 MINJUL 8
Comments
Memoirs of Agatea

A Troll New World

Back in April, Liz and Ben attended the seventh bi-annual Australian Discworld Convention, Nullus Anxietas VII! They enlisted fellow convention guest (and friend of the podcast), author Tansy Rayner Roberts, to discuss the earliest Discworld short story: 1991's Troll Bridge! Cohen the Barbarian has led a long life, but his greatest glories and biggest adventures seem far behind him. It's time to tick a few items off his bucket list - starting with facing a troll in one-on-one combat. But when he and his annoying talking horse reach one of the few troll bridges left on the Disc, things aren't as straightforward as they were in the old days... With the Snowgum Films adaptation of Troll Bridge being screened at the convention, it seemed only right to cover the source material in this, our first ever live show! Like a lot of Pratchett's work, Troll Bridge is by turns silly and deep, drawing on the traditions of Tolkien and Howard while at the same time pointing out that their worlds couldn't stay the same forever. Did you find it poignant? When do you think it happens in Cohen's timeline? And is a short story enough for an entire podcast? We'd love to know! Use the hashtag #PratchatNA7 on social media to join the conversation.

89 MINJUN 23
Comments
A Troll New World

The Thing Beneath My Wings

EFor our twentieth episode we finish our first Pratchett series! Elizabeth and Ben are joined by writer Dr Lili Wilkinson to discover the final fate of Masklin, Angalo, Gurder and the rest of the Nomes in the 1990 conclusion to the Bromeliad: Wings! When Masklin arrived in the Store, he learned that the Thing - an ancient artefact handed down over thousands of generations of Nomes - wasn't just a useless box, but could speak. It warned him of the destruction of the Store, helped him escape with all the Store Nomes in a truck to the quarry, and revealed that Nomes came to Earth from a distant star. Masklin knows the Nomes can't run from humans forever - they have to find a proper home of their own. So with the help of the Abbott Gurder and explorer Angalo, he's going to sneak onto a Concorde and go to Florida to hijack a satellite so the Thing can talk to their starship and fly them to another planet. Not that Masklin understands what most of those words mean... The Book of the Nomes concludes with a rollicking, fast-paced adventure that doesn't shy away from some big questions about identity, religion, philosophy and taking risks to do what's right. Picking up from where we left him at the start of Diggers, Wings follows Masklin, Angalo and Gurder as they travel vast distances, meet their own gods and eventually have a close encounter of the Nome kind. Did you find the ending satisfying? How does the mix of fantasy and sci-fi tropes site with you? Do you wish there'd been more stories of the Nomes? We'd love to hear from you! Use the hashtag #Pratchat20 on social media to join the conversation.

118 MINJUN 8
Comments
The Thing Beneath My Wings

It Don't Mean a Thing if it Ain't Got Rocks In

EIn our nineteenth episode it's back to the Discworld as we join Death, and meet his granddaughter Susan, as writer and illustrator Fury joins us to talk about the 1994 Discworld novel, Soul Music! Susan Sto Helit doesn’t have time for anything silly – not for grief, not for tiny skeletal rats who are here to inform her of SQUEAK, and most definitely not for this new craze sweeping the disc. But music with rocks in it has other ideas, and doesn’t care who gets swept up in the swell. With her long lost grandfather (the one with the bony knees) missing in action however, Susan has no choice but to take on the family business and try not to *erm* rock the boat. Pratchett is never one to shy away from the big themes and Soul Music packs a lot of punch into a deceptively simple plot. Exploring the complexities of grief, and the idea that family is more than just genetics, the 16th Discworld continues the story from where Mort left off, and introduces us to some new (sadly one-off) name...

134 MINMAY 8
Comments
It Don't Mean a Thing if it Ain't Got Rocks In

Latest Episodes

The Long Dark Mr Teatime of the Soul

EIn episode 26, Michael Williams of The Wheeler Centre joins Liz and Ben to get into the holiday spirit with the very Christmassy 1996 Discworld novel Hogfather. It's Hogswatch, and the Assassins Guild of Ankh-Morpork has accepted a very unusual assignment, and Lord Downey has given it to the very unusual assassin Mr Teatime. But who would want to kill the Hogfather? And how would you even accomplish such a thing? As Death fills in for the Fat Man delivering presents, his granddaughter Susan is reluctantly drawn to investigate, teaming up with the newly created Oh God of Hangovers. But much more than the joy of children is at stake - for without the Hogfather, will the sun even rise tomorrow? Hogfather brings to life a character previously mentioned only in passing rather paradoxically by replacing him with Death, who gets a sort of working holiday. It's our second and final adventure with Susan, and the wizards get heavily involved - as does their arcane thinking machine Hex. It's full of not-quite-Christmas cheer, black humour, true pathos and a pure expression of many of Terry's most deeply held beliefs. Could this be the ultimate story of Christmas? Do its themes of belief and justice hit the mark? And what kind of creature would you call into existence if there were excess belief sloshing around? Use the hashtag #Pratchat26 on social media to join the conversation and have your say! Guest Michael Williams is the Director of the Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas in Melbourne. They have a year-round program of talks, interviews, panel discussions, podcasts and writing. Find out more about what's happening at @wheelercentre on Twitter and Instagram, or check out videos of past talks on YouTube. You'll find all the Wheeler Centre's upcoming events at wheelercentre.com, as well as a collection of Michael's writings and events. The Sci-Fight comedy debate over the topic "Santa is Real" features a great line-up of comedians and scientists, including previous Pratchat guest Nate Byrne (episode 24). It's on at Howler in Brunswick on Thursday December 12, 2019. Details and tickets via scifight.com.au. Next month we continue through the Discworld with 1997's Jingo, a tale of nationalism, war, racism and greed, which also has a submarine in it. We'll be recording in the week or so before Hogswa- er, Christmas, so get your questions in via social media using the hashtag #Pratchat27. You'll find the full notes and errata for this episode on our web site. Want to make sure we get through every Pratchett book? You can support Pratchat for as little as $2 a month and get subscriber bonuses, like the exclusive bonus podcast Ook Club!

130 MIN15 h ago
Comments
The Long Dark Mr Teatime of the Soul

The Pratchatters' Guide to the Night Terrace

EIn this bonus mini-episode of Pratchat, Liz asks Ben about Night Terrace, the time travel radio comedy series from Splendid Chaps Productions! Get the lowdown on the characters, hear some excerpts, and find out how or if it connects to the Discworld. Season three of the show is crowdfunding right now; the campaign ends very soon, so get in before November 22 if you want to help it get made!

9 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Pratchatters' Guide to the Night Terrace

Eskist Attitudes

EIn episode 25, Elizabeth, Ben and Noongar writer and poet Claire G. Coleman go back to the early days of the Discworld to Granny Weatherwax's debut in 1986's Equal Rites. Drum Billet, wizard, travels to the village of Bad Ass high in the Ramtop mountains, where at the moment of his death he hands over his wizard's staff to the newborn eighth son of an eighth son. But Eskarina Smith isn't the eighth son of anyone, and it falls to the witch Granny Weatherwax to watch over her. As Esk comes into her powers, Granny realises she needs training in the ways of wizardry lest she pose a danger to everyone around her. So the pair set off to distant Ankh-Morpork on a quest to enrol Esk as the first ever female student of Unseen University... Equal Rites is a book of contradictions: it doesn't feel quite like the Discworld, but it's vital and beautifully written. It's not full of jokes or footnotes, but is consistently funny. And even after more than thirty years, it feels entirely relevant. Do you recognise Esk's struggle? Did Granny feel like Granny yet? And why did it take so long for Pratchett to revisit some of these characters? Use the hashtag #Pratchat25 on social media to join the conversation and tell us your thoughts! Guest Claire G. Coleman's novels are the multi-award winning Terra Nullius, and her new work The Old Lie. She also writes short fiction, poetry and non-fiction and has been published in numerous publications. You can find her on Twitter and Instagram as @clairegcoleman, or visit her web site, clairegcoleman.com, for more info. Next month we're joined by the Director of the Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas, Michael Williams, as we celebrate Hogswatch by discussing - what else? - Hogfather!

127 MINNOV 8
Comments
Eskist Attitudes

Arsenic and Old Clays

EIn episode 24, weather presenter, meteorologist and science communicator Nate Byrne joins Elizabeth and Ben for a Discworld tale of murder, golems and nobility in 1996's Feet of Clay. Two old men have been murdered in Ankh-Morpork, but they're not the worst of Commander Vimes' woes. His best Sergeant is six weeks from retirement; his worst Corporal might be the Earl of Ankh; his newest recruit is an alchemist with some pretty strange ideas for a dwarf; and someone has poisoned the Patrician, though he's damned if he can figure out how. And somehow, the golems are involved... Content note: this episode contains brief discussion of (fictional) suicide. If you or anyone you know needs help, use the Wikipedia list of crisis lines to find one local to you. Following on from Men at Arms (from way back in episode one!), Feet of Clay evolves the Watch - and its leader - even further, and introduces some of Pratchett's most memorable supporting characters: Cheery Littlebottom, Wee Mad Arthur and Dorfl the golem. It gets a bit deep on questions of artificial life, gender expression and identity, and is a heck of a mystery novel to boot. Did you figure out "whatdunnit"? Who's your favourite new character? And what do you think the Pratchat coat of arms and motto should be? Use the hashtag #Pratchat24 on social media to join the conversation and let us know what you think! PS - we recorded this just before the casting announcements for The Watch television series, so don't be disappointed when they don't come up! We'll find a place to discuss them in the near future.

134 MINOCT 8
Comments
Arsenic and Old Clays

The Music of the Nitt

EFor episode 23, Elizabeth and Ben are joined by teacher, opera singer and Dungeon Master Myf Coghill on a trip to Ankh-Morpork's opera house in 1994's Discworld novel of witches, phantoms and experimental cookery: Maskerade! Nanny Ogg has a problem on her hands: she's stuck in a coven with Granny Weatherwax without a third witch. She decides young Agnes Nitt - last seen dabbling in the craft while wearing black lace and calling herself "Perdita" - is just the person to fill the position, but Agnes has run off to Ankh-Morpork to join the opera. Strange things are afoot behind the curtains and greasepaint: a ghost watches their every move, and can't seem to decide if he wants to improve things or kill people... Pratchett delves into a world hitherto unknown to him and takes Granny and Nanny to the big city for their penultimate starring adventure, heavily influenced by The Phantom of the Opera. We learn a lot about opera, Andrew Lloyd Webber and the world of publishing, and delve into Pratchett's treatment of Agnes, a beloved character whose unflattering portrayal was the subject of many questions and comments. So many in fact that this episode could barely be contained - it's a long one, but still jam-packed! Did Maskerade bring out the opera fan in you? Do you think Agnes deserved better? And despite being a bit of a downer, is this one of the best Discworld books we've discussed so far? Use the hashtag #Pratchat23 on social media to join the conversation and let us know what you think! We're staying in Ankh-Morpork for Feet of Clay in October before heading back in time to revisit the origins of Granny Weatherwax in November with Equal Rites. And we have something very suitable planned for December! Plus our subscriber-only podcast, Ook Club, has launched - episodes are available to subscribers at any level, so support us for as little as $2 a month to check it out. You'll find all the details on our Support Us page.

138 MINSEP 8
Comments
The Music of the Nitt

The Cat in the Prat

EEpisode 22 features Elizabeth, Ben and resident Pratcat Asimov for a look at one of Pratchett's oddest books: 1989's humorous examination of all things feline, The Unadulterated Cat. Cats these days just aren't a patch on the ones you used to get: untameable aloof outdoor beasts who are more likely to trap you in a neighbours' house with a broken leg (long story) than to sit nicely on your lap and purr. The Campaign for Real Cats has had enough of modern, "fizzy keg" cats, with their bows and bells and posing. This is the Campaign's guide to identifying, understanding and appreciating honest-to-Bastet real cats. Pratchett teams up with cartoonist and illustrator Gray Jolliffe to give us a tongue-firm-in-durry-cheek rundown of the world of cats in one of his rare non-fiction works. It's the kind of thing you buy the cat lover in your life for Christmas, full of chapters detailing the types of cats, their names, the games they play and "advice" on how to deal with them. Are you a cat lover? Did this ring true for you? We'd love to hear from you - and to hear your cat stories, and any real cats you've identified in fiction! Use the hashtag #Pratchat22 on social media to join the conversation.

76 MINAUG 8
Comments
The Cat in the Prat

Memoirs of Agatea

ETwenty-one today! In this episode, Elizabeth and Ben are joined by David Ryding of Melbourne UNESCO City of Literature as we rejoin Rincewind and some of his old friends in the 17th Discworld novel: 1994's Interesting Times. Rincewind, the worst student Unseen University ever had, has been quite literally to hell and back. But when a summons arrives in Ankh-Morpork requesting the presence of "the Great Wizzard", his old faculty bring him home, then send him to the far-flung Agatean Empire. All is not well on the Counterweight Continent: rebels are (gently) questioning centuries of enforced order, inspired by the revolutionary pamphlet "What I Did on My Holidays". The ruthless Lord Hong plots to change the Empire forever. The walls have failed to keep out a horde of barbarian invaders - seven of them, in fact. And it's about to be visited by a very special kind of butterfly... Pratchett revisits characters from his first Discworld novels, as Rincewind is reunited with Cohen the Barbarian in Twoflower's homeland. But in 2019, twenty-five years after it was first published, his depiction of a comic fantasy Asia leaves a bit to be desired. There's plenty going on, and some stirring speeches, but it's also hard to ignore that nearly all the main characters are white folks "saving" a nation inspired by real-world Asian countries from itself. Is there a clear message in the book? How does this sit on the evolution of Pratchett's work from parody to satire? And were you glad to see such old favourite characters return, or could you have done without them? We'd love to hear from you! Use the hashtag #Pratchat21 on social media to join the conversation.

121 MINJUL 8
Comments
Memoirs of Agatea

A Troll New World

Back in April, Liz and Ben attended the seventh bi-annual Australian Discworld Convention, Nullus Anxietas VII! They enlisted fellow convention guest (and friend of the podcast), author Tansy Rayner Roberts, to discuss the earliest Discworld short story: 1991's Troll Bridge! Cohen the Barbarian has led a long life, but his greatest glories and biggest adventures seem far behind him. It's time to tick a few items off his bucket list - starting with facing a troll in one-on-one combat. But when he and his annoying talking horse reach one of the few troll bridges left on the Disc, things aren't as straightforward as they were in the old days... With the Snowgum Films adaptation of Troll Bridge being screened at the convention, it seemed only right to cover the source material in this, our first ever live show! Like a lot of Pratchett's work, Troll Bridge is by turns silly and deep, drawing on the traditions of Tolkien and Howard while at the same time pointing out that their worlds couldn't stay the same forever. Did you find it poignant? When do you think it happens in Cohen's timeline? And is a short story enough for an entire podcast? We'd love to know! Use the hashtag #PratchatNA7 on social media to join the conversation.

89 MINJUN 23
Comments
A Troll New World

The Thing Beneath My Wings

EFor our twentieth episode we finish our first Pratchett series! Elizabeth and Ben are joined by writer Dr Lili Wilkinson to discover the final fate of Masklin, Angalo, Gurder and the rest of the Nomes in the 1990 conclusion to the Bromeliad: Wings! When Masklin arrived in the Store, he learned that the Thing - an ancient artefact handed down over thousands of generations of Nomes - wasn't just a useless box, but could speak. It warned him of the destruction of the Store, helped him escape with all the Store Nomes in a truck to the quarry, and revealed that Nomes came to Earth from a distant star. Masklin knows the Nomes can't run from humans forever - they have to find a proper home of their own. So with the help of the Abbott Gurder and explorer Angalo, he's going to sneak onto a Concorde and go to Florida to hijack a satellite so the Thing can talk to their starship and fly them to another planet. Not that Masklin understands what most of those words mean... The Book of the Nomes concludes with a rollicking, fast-paced adventure that doesn't shy away from some big questions about identity, religion, philosophy and taking risks to do what's right. Picking up from where we left him at the start of Diggers, Wings follows Masklin, Angalo and Gurder as they travel vast distances, meet their own gods and eventually have a close encounter of the Nome kind. Did you find the ending satisfying? How does the mix of fantasy and sci-fi tropes site with you? Do you wish there'd been more stories of the Nomes? We'd love to hear from you! Use the hashtag #Pratchat20 on social media to join the conversation.

118 MINJUN 8
Comments
The Thing Beneath My Wings

It Don't Mean a Thing if it Ain't Got Rocks In

EIn our nineteenth episode it's back to the Discworld as we join Death, and meet his granddaughter Susan, as writer and illustrator Fury joins us to talk about the 1994 Discworld novel, Soul Music! Susan Sto Helit doesn’t have time for anything silly – not for grief, not for tiny skeletal rats who are here to inform her of SQUEAK, and most definitely not for this new craze sweeping the disc. But music with rocks in it has other ideas, and doesn’t care who gets swept up in the swell. With her long lost grandfather (the one with the bony knees) missing in action however, Susan has no choice but to take on the family business and try not to *erm* rock the boat. Pratchett is never one to shy away from the big themes and Soul Music packs a lot of punch into a deceptively simple plot. Exploring the complexities of grief, and the idea that family is more than just genetics, the 16th Discworld continues the story from where Mort left off, and introduces us to some new (sadly one-off) name...

134 MINMAY 8
Comments
It Don't Mean a Thing if it Ain't Got Rocks In
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。