title

StrategyDriven Editorial Perspective

StrategyDriven

0
Followers
0
Plays
StrategyDriven Editorial Perspective
StrategyDriven Editorial Perspective

StrategyDriven Editorial Perspective

StrategyDriven

0
Followers
0
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Learn how to deal with today's unnecessary marketplace uncertainty to create value-adding results.

Latest Episodes

StrategyDriven Editorial Perspective – Good Intentions, Bad Results: Learning from the Panic of 1826

They say the road to hell is paved with good intentions. In 1825,to deal with the “Indian Problem,”the US Congress formed a region known as “Indian Country,” lands West of the Mississippi (today Oklahoma). Their intentions were good. “The removal of the tribes from the territory which they now inhabit would not only shield them from impending ruin, but promote their welfare and happiness,” President James Monroe told Congress on January 27. He went so far as to say that without a defined Indian country “their degradation and extermination will be inevitable.” It’s heartening to know that at least some of the President’s contemporaries could see through his good intentions. New York County District Attorney Hugh Maxwell and twelve other prominent New Yorkers wrote in a pamphlet published in1825 that “the American Indians, now living upon lands derived from their ancestors and never alienated or surrendered, have a perfect right to the continued and undisturbed possession o...

11 MIN2014 MAR 6
Comments
StrategyDriven Editorial Perspective – Good Intentions, Bad Results: Learning from the Panic of 1826
the END

Latest Episodes

StrategyDriven Editorial Perspective – Good Intentions, Bad Results: Learning from the Panic of 1826

They say the road to hell is paved with good intentions. In 1825,to deal with the “Indian Problem,”the US Congress formed a region known as “Indian Country,” lands West of the Mississippi (today Oklahoma). Their intentions were good. “The removal of the tribes from the territory which they now inhabit would not only shield them from impending ruin, but promote their welfare and happiness,” President James Monroe told Congress on January 27. He went so far as to say that without a defined Indian country “their degradation and extermination will be inevitable.” It’s heartening to know that at least some of the President’s contemporaries could see through his good intentions. New York County District Attorney Hugh Maxwell and twelve other prominent New Yorkers wrote in a pamphlet published in1825 that “the American Indians, now living upon lands derived from their ancestors and never alienated or surrendered, have a perfect right to the continued and undisturbed possession o...

11 MIN2014 MAR 6
Comments
StrategyDriven Editorial Perspective – Good Intentions, Bad Results: Learning from the Panic of 1826
the END
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。