title

The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics

Melina Palmer

9
Followers
4
Plays
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics

The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics

Melina Palmer

9
Followers
4
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Consumers are weird. They don't do what they say they will do and don't act how we think they "should." Enter Melina Palmer, a sales conversion expert with a personal mission to make your business more effective and brain friendly. In this podcast, Melina will take the complex concepts of behavioral economics (the study and science of why people buy - or not) and provide simple, actionable tips you can apply right away in your business. Whether you're a small business or thriving corporation, Melina's tips can help your business increase sales and get more customers.

Latest Episodes

5 Things Your Business Must Learn from NASA

In honor of the 50 year anniversary of Neil Armstrong landing on the moon, we are going to talk about behavioral economics lessons you can learn from NASA! On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong descended onto the lunar surface and uttered those immortal words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." It’s hard to believe that was 50 years ago, and that – knowing what we know today about technology – that it was able to be done with the equipment they had available. Most anyone today would think it was impossible to have completed that feat in the 1960s. So the questions may arise – why then? Why the moon? Why did it matter so much? There are lots of lessons your business can learn from NASA during the space race. While your failures are likely not life or death situations and you may not be breaking world records at every turn, and this story unfolded half a century ago, I want to break down five areas where your business – no matter what industry you are in – can learn from the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions at NASA. CLICK HERE FOR YOUR FREE DOWNLOAD! Show Notes: [05:40] On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong descended onto the lunar surface and uttered those immortal words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." [05:43] Most people today would think that would be an impossible feat with 1960s technology. [06:40] The cold war intensified as the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first satellite, into orbit in October 1957 – much to the shock of the United States. [07:19] This led to fear and essentially kicked off the space race. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (also known as NASA) was created in 1958. [07:47] Kennedy really ratcheted up excitement and budget for NASA. [07:59] In Kennedy's famous speech at Rice University, he mentioned that the budget and taxes would be increased to accommodate the new space program. [08:24] Overall, the Apollo program cost nearly 20 billion dollars – a third of NASA’s budget for those 13 years, so public interest was important to keep funding around for the program. [08:42] Kennedy also does a great job of priming and framing throughout the speech, and playing on the past victories and pride of the US, Texas and the city of Houston. [09:17] In the moon speech, he did great work to motivate the audience and the general public about the importance of the program and to encourage them to get behind the initiative. [10:53] Kennedy drew a line in the sand that helped launch the program. He also helped to overcome some hurdles by saying we CHOOSE to go to the moon. [12:02] Acknowledging our mistakes and hinting that the Soviets had mistakes helped to instill confidence and combat the availability bias. [13:24] Kennedy also made the task ahead relatable to the audience. [14:35] Kennedy's speech was truly amazing and inspiring. Everybody should read /watch it. [14:57] There are a lot of lessons that your business can learn from NASA during the space race. [15:47] 1) Look for problems (and solutions) [16:31] It would be impossible to think of every possible issue that could come up, but it was critical to think through as many of these pieces as possible. [17:01] Using challenges as inspiration is in direct competition with a bias humans are susceptible to called functional fixedness. [17:23] There are times in your business when this natural bias in your brain is doing more damage than you realize. [19:00] When the astronauts needed to fix their CO2 scrubber, they were literally faced with fitting a square peg in a round hole. Flight director Gene Kranz famously said, "I don't care what anything was designed to do--I care about what it can do." Those on the ground were inspired to overcome their natural tendency toward functional fixedness to create an ingenious hack to save the lives of the astronauts over 100,000 miles away. [19:12] It's important to think through problems before they come up. [20:05] 2) Test and Retest (But Know When

36 MIN3 days ago
Comments
5 Things Your Business Must Learn from NASA

Behavioral Economics Foundations: Mental Accounting

Hopefully, you tuned in last week for the special anniversary episode, where I went over the top episodes by downloads, your votes and some of my favorites. I also gave some of my book recommendations and a sneak peek behind the scenes with the top questions I get asked, the weird thing I hear all the time now…and so much more. Today, we are back into the swing of things with a behavioral economics foundations episode on mental accounting. This concept was mentioned briefly in the biases series, but today we are going to dig into what this really is and just how much it impacts our approach to money, risk, time and more. CLICK HERE FOR YOUR FREE DOWNLOAD! Show Notes: [05:02] The concept of mental accounting was introduced by nobel prize winner Richard Thaler, and is based on humans’ illogical approach to value in relative terms instead of looking at it as an absolute. [05:31] Three examples by Richard Thaler of mental accounting. [07:41] These are all examples of the way that mental accounting can impact the decisions we make. [08:17] Money and accounts should be perfectly fungible (that is an economics term for interchangeable). It shouldn’t matter if money was in a savings account, or a checking account or your pocket or a 401k…it would all exchange exactly the same. [09:32] Our brain segregates when thinking about money. This is one of the reasons the field of behavioral economics was needed…traditional economics does not account for the importance of this phenomenon. [10:10] The three ways money is commonly labeled: expenses are grouped into budgets like food, rent, and entertainment. Wealth is separated into accounts (checking, emergency or “rainy day” funds, and retirement). And lastly income is looked at in categories: namely regular or windfall. [12:35] Much like regular accounting, in mental accounting, individuals will book and post any occurring or planned transactions to the mental account. [15:59] When businesses are reporting their year-end earnings and losses, they always want to have a positive year end, which could make it tempting to hold on to losses until the next year. [16:42] If you are looking like you are going to have a bad year and have no option but to take a loss, general wisdom is to throw in as much negative and expense as you can. If it is going to be negative, might as well have it all come in at once. (Known as “taking the big bath”) [17:13] Adding a small amount to an already large payment doesn’t feel the same as having that payment on its own. This is because of decoupling – where you remove the pain of the payment away from the joy of the purchase. [18:28] There are some times where people significantly prefer to prepay over delaying their payments. Vacations are enjoyed more when they are prepaid because they feel free. [24:10] The way the consumer uses their mental accounting transforms something that can be very expensive hobby (like wine collecting) into one that is seen as free. [25:24] People can and often do plan for expenses in one way and experience it completely differently in the moment. [26:57] Internalize how the brain is wired to make its decisions around mental accounting. Think about how this has impacted you and how it can impact your customers. [27:52] Expenses are thought about in budgets, and wealth is considered in accounts. [28:03] The most tempting and easiest accounts to spend from are the current assets, this is your checking account and physical cash. [28:13] It's less tempting to spend from the current wealth category, which is made up of other liquid assets – savings accounts, stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. [28:33] The next, even less tempting category is equity (like that in a home or car you own). Future income is the least tempting category. These are your retirement accounts. [29:27] Those who have issues with self control should set up accounts that are off limits and put together automatic transfers so they are not tempted. [31:03] An example of

47 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Behavioral Economics Foundations: Mental Accounting

Special Anniversary Episode: Celebrating the First Year of the Podcast

Welcome to season two of The Brainy Business. This episode is a special anniversary episode celebrating the first year of the podcast. I can’t believe it has been a full year already. Year one brought us 54 episodes with over 60,000 downloads in 133 countries around the world. So much has happened this year. I’ve made amazing connections to listeners in person and on social media. I’ve had conversations with academics, students, business owners, and marketers. I also launched my column on Inc.com Today, I’m going to share the top ten episodes by downloads, some of your favorites – with clips from the audiograms you submitted, and a few of my favorite episodes – including which ones I share the most. I will also give some looks behind the scenes, with the top questions I get asked, the funniest thing people say to me now (that I had never heard before becoming a podcaster), my favorite books, and more. CLICK HERE FOR YOUR FREE DOWNLOAD! Show Notes: [05:43] An audio clip featuring Nikki Rausch of Sales Maven. [06:06] The Business Bros are early adopters and find this podcast instrumental in their marketing. [08:59] I share the top 10 podcasts based on your downloads. [09:40] A message from Maureen about episode 43 and how she benefited from a discovery call and then working together. [13:15] Number 9 on the countdown was episode 42: A Behavioral Economics Analysi of Apple Card. [14:54] Episode 32 was one of my favorite episodes, and it includes the chocolate cake study. This one is about The Overwhelmed Brain, and I play a quick clip from Debby. This was also the first episode where I referenced the Texas A & M Human Behavior Lab. [19:27] Episode 3 about lead magnets was number 7. This was based on a popular video I did before the podcast launched. [21:03] Episode 47: The Behavioral Analysis of Costco was number 6. I have some more fun business analysis shows coming up. [23:16] Episode 35, which was The Introduction to Choice Architecture and Nudging. This episode is where I first started using my air conditioner example. This is a really intricate and complex topic. It's critical for any business to understand the complexity of choice. [27:03] Episode 45: An Overview of Personal Biases was the fourth most downloaded episode. I was a bit nervous launching into this rapid fire series. [29:10] Number 3 was episode 5: The Truth About Pricing. I also play a quick clip by Kadra who I was fortunate enough to work with. [32:47] The second most downloaded episode of all time is episode 2. This episode was the Top 5 Wording Mistakes That Businesses Make. Because of this episode I am now associated with cotton candy grapes. [34:40] Number 1 is also Episode 1: Unlocking the Secrets of the Brain. I write out full scripts for my podcast. I discovered this was the best way to work after episode 1 and 2 had to be recorded multiple times each. [37:38] Episode 11: Anchoring and Adjustment was also really popular. This is the episode with the story about the 38% increase of sales in Snickers. [38:48] Episode 23: Reciprocity and Episode 31 on Mirror Neurons were also popular with listeners. I got to talk about Sheldon Cooper and the Big Bang Theory in episode 23 (which I love). Mirror neurons are so fascinating and one of my favorite topics. [41:39] Kelly Ferguson, of Ferguson Avenue Photography said via Facebook that episode 8, What is Value? is her favorite. It was so much fun to come up with examples of what creates real value. [42:48] An episode I recommend often is episode 16 on Framing. I also recommend episode 19 on Herding and episode 17 The Power of Numbers. [44:00] I also loved talking about Time Discounting and my interview with Texas A & M. My online strategy session was also a favorite. [44:53] I also loved the episode on Booms, Bubbles and Busts because it was really fun to talk about tulips and Beanie Babies. [45:13] The last episode I want to talk about is episode 9 which was my very first foundations episode on Loss Aver

60 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Special Anniversary Episode: Celebrating the First Year of the Podcast

Latest Episodes

5 Things Your Business Must Learn from NASA

In honor of the 50 year anniversary of Neil Armstrong landing on the moon, we are going to talk about behavioral economics lessons you can learn from NASA! On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong descended onto the lunar surface and uttered those immortal words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." It’s hard to believe that was 50 years ago, and that – knowing what we know today about technology – that it was able to be done with the equipment they had available. Most anyone today would think it was impossible to have completed that feat in the 1960s. So the questions may arise – why then? Why the moon? Why did it matter so much? There are lots of lessons your business can learn from NASA during the space race. While your failures are likely not life or death situations and you may not be breaking world records at every turn, and this story unfolded half a century ago, I want to break down five areas where your business – no matter what industry you are in – can learn from the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions at NASA. CLICK HERE FOR YOUR FREE DOWNLOAD! Show Notes: [05:40] On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong descended onto the lunar surface and uttered those immortal words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." [05:43] Most people today would think that would be an impossible feat with 1960s technology. [06:40] The cold war intensified as the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first satellite, into orbit in October 1957 – much to the shock of the United States. [07:19] This led to fear and essentially kicked off the space race. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (also known as NASA) was created in 1958. [07:47] Kennedy really ratcheted up excitement and budget for NASA. [07:59] In Kennedy's famous speech at Rice University, he mentioned that the budget and taxes would be increased to accommodate the new space program. [08:24] Overall, the Apollo program cost nearly 20 billion dollars – a third of NASA’s budget for those 13 years, so public interest was important to keep funding around for the program. [08:42] Kennedy also does a great job of priming and framing throughout the speech, and playing on the past victories and pride of the US, Texas and the city of Houston. [09:17] In the moon speech, he did great work to motivate the audience and the general public about the importance of the program and to encourage them to get behind the initiative. [10:53] Kennedy drew a line in the sand that helped launch the program. He also helped to overcome some hurdles by saying we CHOOSE to go to the moon. [12:02] Acknowledging our mistakes and hinting that the Soviets had mistakes helped to instill confidence and combat the availability bias. [13:24] Kennedy also made the task ahead relatable to the audience. [14:35] Kennedy's speech was truly amazing and inspiring. Everybody should read /watch it. [14:57] There are a lot of lessons that your business can learn from NASA during the space race. [15:47] 1) Look for problems (and solutions) [16:31] It would be impossible to think of every possible issue that could come up, but it was critical to think through as many of these pieces as possible. [17:01] Using challenges as inspiration is in direct competition with a bias humans are susceptible to called functional fixedness. [17:23] There are times in your business when this natural bias in your brain is doing more damage than you realize. [19:00] When the astronauts needed to fix their CO2 scrubber, they were literally faced with fitting a square peg in a round hole. Flight director Gene Kranz famously said, "I don't care what anything was designed to do--I care about what it can do." Those on the ground were inspired to overcome their natural tendency toward functional fixedness to create an ingenious hack to save the lives of the astronauts over 100,000 miles away. [19:12] It's important to think through problems before they come up. [20:05] 2) Test and Retest (But Know When

36 MIN3 days ago
Comments
5 Things Your Business Must Learn from NASA

Behavioral Economics Foundations: Mental Accounting

Hopefully, you tuned in last week for the special anniversary episode, where I went over the top episodes by downloads, your votes and some of my favorites. I also gave some of my book recommendations and a sneak peek behind the scenes with the top questions I get asked, the weird thing I hear all the time now…and so much more. Today, we are back into the swing of things with a behavioral economics foundations episode on mental accounting. This concept was mentioned briefly in the biases series, but today we are going to dig into what this really is and just how much it impacts our approach to money, risk, time and more. CLICK HERE FOR YOUR FREE DOWNLOAD! Show Notes: [05:02] The concept of mental accounting was introduced by nobel prize winner Richard Thaler, and is based on humans’ illogical approach to value in relative terms instead of looking at it as an absolute. [05:31] Three examples by Richard Thaler of mental accounting. [07:41] These are all examples of the way that mental accounting can impact the decisions we make. [08:17] Money and accounts should be perfectly fungible (that is an economics term for interchangeable). It shouldn’t matter if money was in a savings account, or a checking account or your pocket or a 401k…it would all exchange exactly the same. [09:32] Our brain segregates when thinking about money. This is one of the reasons the field of behavioral economics was needed…traditional economics does not account for the importance of this phenomenon. [10:10] The three ways money is commonly labeled: expenses are grouped into budgets like food, rent, and entertainment. Wealth is separated into accounts (checking, emergency or “rainy day” funds, and retirement). And lastly income is looked at in categories: namely regular or windfall. [12:35] Much like regular accounting, in mental accounting, individuals will book and post any occurring or planned transactions to the mental account. [15:59] When businesses are reporting their year-end earnings and losses, they always want to have a positive year end, which could make it tempting to hold on to losses until the next year. [16:42] If you are looking like you are going to have a bad year and have no option but to take a loss, general wisdom is to throw in as much negative and expense as you can. If it is going to be negative, might as well have it all come in at once. (Known as “taking the big bath”) [17:13] Adding a small amount to an already large payment doesn’t feel the same as having that payment on its own. This is because of decoupling – where you remove the pain of the payment away from the joy of the purchase. [18:28] There are some times where people significantly prefer to prepay over delaying their payments. Vacations are enjoyed more when they are prepaid because they feel free. [24:10] The way the consumer uses their mental accounting transforms something that can be very expensive hobby (like wine collecting) into one that is seen as free. [25:24] People can and often do plan for expenses in one way and experience it completely differently in the moment. [26:57] Internalize how the brain is wired to make its decisions around mental accounting. Think about how this has impacted you and how it can impact your customers. [27:52] Expenses are thought about in budgets, and wealth is considered in accounts. [28:03] The most tempting and easiest accounts to spend from are the current assets, this is your checking account and physical cash. [28:13] It's less tempting to spend from the current wealth category, which is made up of other liquid assets – savings accounts, stocks, bonds, and mutual funds. [28:33] The next, even less tempting category is equity (like that in a home or car you own). Future income is the least tempting category. These are your retirement accounts. [29:27] Those who have issues with self control should set up accounts that are off limits and put together automatic transfers so they are not tempted. [31:03] An example of

47 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Behavioral Economics Foundations: Mental Accounting

Special Anniversary Episode: Celebrating the First Year of the Podcast

Welcome to season two of The Brainy Business. This episode is a special anniversary episode celebrating the first year of the podcast. I can’t believe it has been a full year already. Year one brought us 54 episodes with over 60,000 downloads in 133 countries around the world. So much has happened this year. I’ve made amazing connections to listeners in person and on social media. I’ve had conversations with academics, students, business owners, and marketers. I also launched my column on Inc.com Today, I’m going to share the top ten episodes by downloads, some of your favorites – with clips from the audiograms you submitted, and a few of my favorite episodes – including which ones I share the most. I will also give some looks behind the scenes, with the top questions I get asked, the funniest thing people say to me now (that I had never heard before becoming a podcaster), my favorite books, and more. CLICK HERE FOR YOUR FREE DOWNLOAD! Show Notes: [05:43] An audio clip featuring Nikki Rausch of Sales Maven. [06:06] The Business Bros are early adopters and find this podcast instrumental in their marketing. [08:59] I share the top 10 podcasts based on your downloads. [09:40] A message from Maureen about episode 43 and how she benefited from a discovery call and then working together. [13:15] Number 9 on the countdown was episode 42: A Behavioral Economics Analysi of Apple Card. [14:54] Episode 32 was one of my favorite episodes, and it includes the chocolate cake study. This one is about The Overwhelmed Brain, and I play a quick clip from Debby. This was also the first episode where I referenced the Texas A & M Human Behavior Lab. [19:27] Episode 3 about lead magnets was number 7. This was based on a popular video I did before the podcast launched. [21:03] Episode 47: The Behavioral Analysis of Costco was number 6. I have some more fun business analysis shows coming up. [23:16] Episode 35, which was The Introduction to Choice Architecture and Nudging. This episode is where I first started using my air conditioner example. This is a really intricate and complex topic. It's critical for any business to understand the complexity of choice. [27:03] Episode 45: An Overview of Personal Biases was the fourth most downloaded episode. I was a bit nervous launching into this rapid fire series. [29:10] Number 3 was episode 5: The Truth About Pricing. I also play a quick clip by Kadra who I was fortunate enough to work with. [32:47] The second most downloaded episode of all time is episode 2. This episode was the Top 5 Wording Mistakes That Businesses Make. Because of this episode I am now associated with cotton candy grapes. [34:40] Number 1 is also Episode 1: Unlocking the Secrets of the Brain. I write out full scripts for my podcast. I discovered this was the best way to work after episode 1 and 2 had to be recorded multiple times each. [37:38] Episode 11: Anchoring and Adjustment was also really popular. This is the episode with the story about the 38% increase of sales in Snickers. [38:48] Episode 23: Reciprocity and Episode 31 on Mirror Neurons were also popular with listeners. I got to talk about Sheldon Cooper and the Big Bang Theory in episode 23 (which I love). Mirror neurons are so fascinating and one of my favorite topics. [41:39] Kelly Ferguson, of Ferguson Avenue Photography said via Facebook that episode 8, What is Value? is her favorite. It was so much fun to come up with examples of what creates real value. [42:48] An episode I recommend often is episode 16 on Framing. I also recommend episode 19 on Herding and episode 17 The Power of Numbers. [44:00] I also loved talking about Time Discounting and my interview with Texas A & M. My online strategy session was also a favorite. [44:53] I also loved the episode on Booms, Bubbles and Busts because it was really fun to talk about tulips and Beanie Babies. [45:13] The last episode I want to talk about is episode 9 which was my very first foundations episode on Loss Aver

60 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Special Anniversary Episode: Celebrating the First Year of the Podcast

Listen Now On Himalaya