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Educators

Academy of Achievement

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Educators
Educators

Educators

Academy of Achievement

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Followers
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Plays
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Latest Episodes

Alan Simpson

For 18 years, Alan K. Simpson represented the State of Wyoming in the United States Senate. As Assistant Majority Leader for ten of those years, he was an influential member of the body's Republican leadership. Partisanship aside, he was noted throughout his service for independent thinking, personal integrity and for a dry sense of humor that evaporated pretension on both sides of the aisle. Simpson grew up in Cody, Wyoming, where members of his family have practiced law for over a century. He was admitted to the Wyoming bar in 1958, as briefly served as Assistant Attorney General of the state. For many years, he practiced law in Cody, and served as City Attorney. In 1964, he began a 13-year career in the Wyoming House of Representatives. He was first elected to the United States Senate in 1978. In his three terms in Washington, he favored a conservative approach to fiscal matters and a moderate view of social issues. One of his proudest achievements in the Senate was the passage o...

10 MIN1998 MAY 23
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Alan Simpson

Stephen Ambrose

Although the historian Stephen Ambrose (1936 - 2002) wrote over 30 books, he was almost as well-known to the public for his appearances on television's political discussion programs, where he was frequently called upon to discuss the American presidency, the history of the American West and the legacy of the Second World War. As a boy growing up in Wisconsin, Stephen Ambrose planned to follow in his father's footsteps as a small-town doctor; he entered the University of Wisconsin as a pre-med student, but his first day in American History class changed his life. He changed his major to history and never looked back. His first book sold fewer than a thousand copies, but it caught the eye of former President Dwight Eisenhower, who invited Ambrose to write an authorized biography. Ambrose's multi-volume lives of Presidents Eisenhower and Nixon, along with works on the opening of the American West, and on the experience of common soldiers in World War II, made him one of America's most ...

12 MIN1998 MAY 23
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Stephen Ambrose

John Napier

The most honored and admired theatrical designer of our times, John Napier has received Broadway's Tony Award for his set designs for Nicholas Nickleby, Cats, Starlight Express, Les Miserables and Sunset Boulevard. He has also created acclaimed settings for the New York and London productions of Equus, Jesus Christ Superstar and Miss Saigon. A native Londoner, he began his formal art studies in his teens, and progressed from painting, to sculpture to set design. He became an Associate Designer at the Royal Shakespeare Company, designing numerous classics there and at Britain's National Theatre before his unparalleled series of successes on Broadway and in London's West End. Napier has applied his creativity in other fields as well, creating settings for the Royal Opera and the Metropolitan Opera, for Las Vegas nightclub spectacles, for Michael Jackson's Captain EO video, and for Steven Spielberg's film, Hook. In this podcast, recorded at the Academy of Achievement's 1994 Summit in L...

8 MIN1994 JUN 1
Comments
John Napier

Rudy Marcus

Rudolph "Rudy" Arthur Marcus is a Canadian-born chemist who received the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. A trailblazing researcher, Dr. Marcus is known for his work in many fields of theoretical chemical kinetics. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for elucidating a thermodynamic and kinetic framework for describing one electron outer-sphere electron transfer. "Marcus theory," provides a mathematical method to determine how fast or slow, or in what direction, electrons jump between molecules without breaking chemical bonds, explaining the electron transfers which make it possible for plants to store energy from sunlight and use it to fuel growth, or for humans to store energy from a meal and use it later to power the body's activities. In addition to the Nobel Prize, he has received the Irving Langmuir Award, the Wolf Prize in Chemistry, the Linus Pauling Award and the National Medal of Science. In this audio podcast, recorded at the Academy of Achievement's 1993 Summit in Glacier Park, ...

6 MIN1993 JUN 26
Comments
Rudy Marcus

Judith Jamison

Judith Jamison is the Artistic Director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, the best-known and most popular modern dance company in the United States. The daughter of a sheet metal worker and teacher, Jamison was sent to classical dance classes at the age of six. Jamison later attended the Philadelphia Dance Academy, where she was recruited Agnes de Mille for the American Ballet Theatre. When the dance production closed, she did a stint as an amusement ride operator at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York City. Jamison was invited by Alvin Ailey to join his company as a principal dancer. For the next 15 years, she thrilled and captivated audiences around the world as “modern dance’s first box-office star.” Jamison then went on to star in the hit Broadway musical “Sophisticated Ladies” based on Duke Ellington’s music. In 1988, she returned to the Ailey troupe to carry on the legacy of its founder. Jamison rejuvenated the company and extended the heritage of black expressio...

13 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Judith Jamison

Arthur Kornberg

The pioneering biochemist Arthur Kornberg (1918 - 2007) was awarded the 1959 Nobel Prize in Medicine for discovering the means by which DNA molecules are duplicated in the bacterial cell -- landmark research that helped advance our understanding of the hereditary process. He was also honored for devising the procedure for reconstructing this duplication process in the test tube. Dr. Kornberg was born in Brooklyn, New York, and educated in the city's public schools. He received his undergraduate degree in science from the City College of New York, and a medical degree from the University of Rochester in 1941. A commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, he was assigned to the Navy as a ship's doctor during World War II. Following the war, he was posted to the National Institutes of Health, where he organized and directed the program in enzyme research. After leaving NIH, he chaired the department of microbiology at Washington University in St. Louis. In 1959, the same ye...

8 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Arthur Kornberg

Joan Steitz

The molecular biologist Joan Steitz is famed for her discoveries involving RNA, one of the three major macromolecules essential for all known forms of life. Growing up in Minnesota, she was fascinated by biology but lacked female role models in the sciences. At Harvard, she was the first female graduate student to join the laboratory of the famed biologist James D. Watson, co-discoverer of the DNA molecule. Throughout her career, her work has centered on the function of RNA in catalytic processes. In 1970, Steitz became an assistant professor at Yale, and within five years had published the groundbreaking research for which she is most famous, demonstrating the complementary base pairing of ribosomes. Her discoveries have blazed new trails for basic molecular biology, and may yield new insights into the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases such as lupus, which develop when patients make antibodies against their own DNA or ribosomes. In 1989, she became the first female rec...

14 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Joan Steitz

Walter Massey

Dr. Walter E. Massey has enjoyed a uniquely varied career at the highest levels of science, education, business and public administration. A precocious student from Hattiesburg, Mississippi, he graduated from Atlanta's Morehouse College in 1958, and earned his doctorate in physics from Washington, University in St. Louis. He became a Professor of Physics at Brown University where he also served as Dean of the College. He later moved to the University of Chicago where he was Vice President for Research, and Director of the Argonne National Laboratory. While his academic research focused on the "many body" theories of quantum liquids and solids, he has also written extensively on the teaching of science and mathematics, and on the role of science and technology in a democratic society. In 1991, President George H.W. Bush named him Director of the National Science Foundation, the government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all fields of non-medical science, ma...

11 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Walter Massey

James Billington

The eminent historian and Russia scholar James H. Billington is the 13th person to serve as Librarian of the United States Congress. Valedictorian of his graduating class at Princeton University, he earned his doctorate in history as a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford. Following service in the U.S. Army, he taught at Harvard University and at Princeton, where he was a professor of history from 1964 to 1974. Billington first undertook the study of the Russian language when he was in high school. During his academic career he visited the Soviet Union as a guest professor at the University of Leningrad and an exchange research professor at the University of Moscow. In 1966 he published The Icon and the Axe: An Interpretive History of Russian culture, an encyclopedic, comprehensive study hailed as "the finest American book on Russia, and one of the major impressive accomplishments of American scholarship since the end of World War II." In 1973, he was chosen to serve as Directo...

10 MIN1992 JUN 26
Comments
James Billington

Thomas Sutherland

In 1985, Thomas Sutherland was serving as Dean of Agriculture at the American University in Beirut, Lebanon. Four months into his term, he was pulled from his car at gunpoint and taken from the life he knew into a six-and-a-half-year hell of chains, beatings, isolation, cold, darkness and despair. Born in Falkirk, Scotland, he graduated from Glasgow University and moved to the United States in the 1950s, earning a Ph.D. in animal breeding from Iowa State University. He taught animal science at Colorado State University for 26 years before accepting a three-year appointment in Beirut. Although American University (AUB) colleagues had already been assassinated and kidnapped by members of the Iranian-backed Islamic Jihad movement, Sutherland was committed to his work and remained in Beirut while others were fleeing the war-torn city. His kidnappers, who may have mistaken him for the university's president, moved him from place to place, chained and blindfolded, holding him in mosquito-...

16 MIN1992 JUN 26
Comments
Thomas Sutherland

Latest Episodes

Alan Simpson

For 18 years, Alan K. Simpson represented the State of Wyoming in the United States Senate. As Assistant Majority Leader for ten of those years, he was an influential member of the body's Republican leadership. Partisanship aside, he was noted throughout his service for independent thinking, personal integrity and for a dry sense of humor that evaporated pretension on both sides of the aisle. Simpson grew up in Cody, Wyoming, where members of his family have practiced law for over a century. He was admitted to the Wyoming bar in 1958, as briefly served as Assistant Attorney General of the state. For many years, he practiced law in Cody, and served as City Attorney. In 1964, he began a 13-year career in the Wyoming House of Representatives. He was first elected to the United States Senate in 1978. In his three terms in Washington, he favored a conservative approach to fiscal matters and a moderate view of social issues. One of his proudest achievements in the Senate was the passage o...

10 MIN1998 MAY 23
Comments
Alan Simpson

Stephen Ambrose

Although the historian Stephen Ambrose (1936 - 2002) wrote over 30 books, he was almost as well-known to the public for his appearances on television's political discussion programs, where he was frequently called upon to discuss the American presidency, the history of the American West and the legacy of the Second World War. As a boy growing up in Wisconsin, Stephen Ambrose planned to follow in his father's footsteps as a small-town doctor; he entered the University of Wisconsin as a pre-med student, but his first day in American History class changed his life. He changed his major to history and never looked back. His first book sold fewer than a thousand copies, but it caught the eye of former President Dwight Eisenhower, who invited Ambrose to write an authorized biography. Ambrose's multi-volume lives of Presidents Eisenhower and Nixon, along with works on the opening of the American West, and on the experience of common soldiers in World War II, made him one of America's most ...

12 MIN1998 MAY 23
Comments
Stephen Ambrose

John Napier

The most honored and admired theatrical designer of our times, John Napier has received Broadway's Tony Award for his set designs for Nicholas Nickleby, Cats, Starlight Express, Les Miserables and Sunset Boulevard. He has also created acclaimed settings for the New York and London productions of Equus, Jesus Christ Superstar and Miss Saigon. A native Londoner, he began his formal art studies in his teens, and progressed from painting, to sculpture to set design. He became an Associate Designer at the Royal Shakespeare Company, designing numerous classics there and at Britain's National Theatre before his unparalleled series of successes on Broadway and in London's West End. Napier has applied his creativity in other fields as well, creating settings for the Royal Opera and the Metropolitan Opera, for Las Vegas nightclub spectacles, for Michael Jackson's Captain EO video, and for Steven Spielberg's film, Hook. In this podcast, recorded at the Academy of Achievement's 1994 Summit in L...

8 MIN1994 JUN 1
Comments
John Napier

Rudy Marcus

Rudolph "Rudy" Arthur Marcus is a Canadian-born chemist who received the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. A trailblazing researcher, Dr. Marcus is known for his work in many fields of theoretical chemical kinetics. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for elucidating a thermodynamic and kinetic framework for describing one electron outer-sphere electron transfer. "Marcus theory," provides a mathematical method to determine how fast or slow, or in what direction, electrons jump between molecules without breaking chemical bonds, explaining the electron transfers which make it possible for plants to store energy from sunlight and use it to fuel growth, or for humans to store energy from a meal and use it later to power the body's activities. In addition to the Nobel Prize, he has received the Irving Langmuir Award, the Wolf Prize in Chemistry, the Linus Pauling Award and the National Medal of Science. In this audio podcast, recorded at the Academy of Achievement's 1993 Summit in Glacier Park, ...

6 MIN1993 JUN 26
Comments
Rudy Marcus

Judith Jamison

Judith Jamison is the Artistic Director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, the best-known and most popular modern dance company in the United States. The daughter of a sheet metal worker and teacher, Jamison was sent to classical dance classes at the age of six. Jamison later attended the Philadelphia Dance Academy, where she was recruited Agnes de Mille for the American Ballet Theatre. When the dance production closed, she did a stint as an amusement ride operator at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York City. Jamison was invited by Alvin Ailey to join his company as a principal dancer. For the next 15 years, she thrilled and captivated audiences around the world as “modern dance’s first box-office star.” Jamison then went on to star in the hit Broadway musical “Sophisticated Ladies” based on Duke Ellington’s music. In 1988, she returned to the Ailey troupe to carry on the legacy of its founder. Jamison rejuvenated the company and extended the heritage of black expressio...

13 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Judith Jamison

Arthur Kornberg

The pioneering biochemist Arthur Kornberg (1918 - 2007) was awarded the 1959 Nobel Prize in Medicine for discovering the means by which DNA molecules are duplicated in the bacterial cell -- landmark research that helped advance our understanding of the hereditary process. He was also honored for devising the procedure for reconstructing this duplication process in the test tube. Dr. Kornberg was born in Brooklyn, New York, and educated in the city's public schools. He received his undergraduate degree in science from the City College of New York, and a medical degree from the University of Rochester in 1941. A commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, he was assigned to the Navy as a ship's doctor during World War II. Following the war, he was posted to the National Institutes of Health, where he organized and directed the program in enzyme research. After leaving NIH, he chaired the department of microbiology at Washington University in St. Louis. In 1959, the same ye...

8 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Arthur Kornberg

Joan Steitz

The molecular biologist Joan Steitz is famed for her discoveries involving RNA, one of the three major macromolecules essential for all known forms of life. Growing up in Minnesota, she was fascinated by biology but lacked female role models in the sciences. At Harvard, she was the first female graduate student to join the laboratory of the famed biologist James D. Watson, co-discoverer of the DNA molecule. Throughout her career, her work has centered on the function of RNA in catalytic processes. In 1970, Steitz became an assistant professor at Yale, and within five years had published the groundbreaking research for which she is most famous, demonstrating the complementary base pairing of ribosomes. Her discoveries have blazed new trails for basic molecular biology, and may yield new insights into the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases such as lupus, which develop when patients make antibodies against their own DNA or ribosomes. In 1989, she became the first female rec...

14 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Joan Steitz

Walter Massey

Dr. Walter E. Massey has enjoyed a uniquely varied career at the highest levels of science, education, business and public administration. A precocious student from Hattiesburg, Mississippi, he graduated from Atlanta's Morehouse College in 1958, and earned his doctorate in physics from Washington, University in St. Louis. He became a Professor of Physics at Brown University where he also served as Dean of the College. He later moved to the University of Chicago where he was Vice President for Research, and Director of the Argonne National Laboratory. While his academic research focused on the "many body" theories of quantum liquids and solids, he has also written extensively on the teaching of science and mathematics, and on the role of science and technology in a democratic society. In 1991, President George H.W. Bush named him Director of the National Science Foundation, the government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all fields of non-medical science, ma...

11 MIN1992 JUN 27
Comments
Walter Massey

James Billington

The eminent historian and Russia scholar James H. Billington is the 13th person to serve as Librarian of the United States Congress. Valedictorian of his graduating class at Princeton University, he earned his doctorate in history as a Rhodes Scholar at Balliol College, Oxford. Following service in the U.S. Army, he taught at Harvard University and at Princeton, where he was a professor of history from 1964 to 1974. Billington first undertook the study of the Russian language when he was in high school. During his academic career he visited the Soviet Union as a guest professor at the University of Leningrad and an exchange research professor at the University of Moscow. In 1966 he published The Icon and the Axe: An Interpretive History of Russian culture, an encyclopedic, comprehensive study hailed as "the finest American book on Russia, and one of the major impressive accomplishments of American scholarship since the end of World War II." In 1973, he was chosen to serve as Directo...

10 MIN1992 JUN 26
Comments
James Billington

Thomas Sutherland

In 1985, Thomas Sutherland was serving as Dean of Agriculture at the American University in Beirut, Lebanon. Four months into his term, he was pulled from his car at gunpoint and taken from the life he knew into a six-and-a-half-year hell of chains, beatings, isolation, cold, darkness and despair. Born in Falkirk, Scotland, he graduated from Glasgow University and moved to the United States in the 1950s, earning a Ph.D. in animal breeding from Iowa State University. He taught animal science at Colorado State University for 26 years before accepting a three-year appointment in Beirut. Although American University (AUB) colleagues had already been assassinated and kidnapped by members of the Iranian-backed Islamic Jihad movement, Sutherland was committed to his work and remained in Beirut while others were fleeing the war-torn city. His kidnappers, who may have mistaken him for the university's president, moved him from place to place, chained and blindfolded, holding him in mosquito-...

16 MIN1992 JUN 26
Comments
Thomas Sutherland