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Podcasts from the journal Medical Education 2011

Medical Education

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Podcasts from the journal Medical Education 2011
Podcasts from the journal Medical Education 2011

Podcasts from the journal Medical Education 2011

Medical Education

2
Followers
5
Plays
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Latest Episodes

Medical students’ illness-related cognitions

Doctors do not follow guidance when managing their own health and illness. This behaviour may start at medical school. This study aimed to investigate whether inappropriate responses to illness are an issue for medical students and, if so, to identify the determinants of students’ responses to illness. Editor in Chief of Medical Education, Kevin Eva speaks to Sarah Ross (Division of Medical and Dental Education, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK) about her co-authored paper focusing on medical students’ illnesses and treatment of their own health, published in the December issue: ‘Medical students’ illness-related cognitions’ by Sarah Ross, Martin von Fragstein and Jennifer Cleland. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04079.x/abstract

13 MIN2011 NOV 30
Comments
Medical students’ illness-related cognitions

Culture in medical education: comparing a Thai and a Canadian residency programme

Globalisation initiatives in medical education are premised on a universal model of medical education. This study was conducted to challenge this premise by empirically examining the impact of culture on the practice of medical education in anaesthesia residency training programmes in Thailand and Canada. Editor in Chief of Medical Education speaks to Dr Anne Wong (Department of Anaesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) about the cultural contexts in her paper published in the December issue of the journal ‘Culture in medical education: comparing a Thai and a Canadian residency programme’. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04059.x/abstract

16 MIN2011 NOV 30
Comments
Culture in medical education: comparing a Thai and a Canadian residency programme

Educational interventions to improve handover in health care: a systematic review

Effective handover within the health care setting is vital to patient safety. Despite published literature discussing strategies to improve handover, the extent to which educational interventions have been used and how such interventions relate to the published theoretical models of handover remain unclear. These issues were investigated through a systematic review of the literature. Editor in Chief Kevin Eva speaks to Morris Gordon (Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Salford, Salford, UK) about the paper he co-authored in the November 2011 issue of Medical Education: 'Educational interventions to improve handover in health care: a systematic review' by Morris Gordon and Rebecca Findley. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04049.x/abstract

17 MIN2011 OCT 20
Comments
Educational interventions to improve handover in health care: a systematic review

Improving the recruitment and retention of doctors by training medical students locally

The global shortage of doctors is of concern. This is particularly true in French-speaking regions of New Brunswick, Canada, where there is no medical school. Since 1981, francophone medical students from New Brunswick have been able to undertake part of their training in their province through an agreement with medical schools in another province. We studied the effects of frequency and length of exposure to the province of origin during medical training on the likelihood that a doctor will ever or currently practise medicine in that province. Editor in Chief Kevin Eva, speaks to Professor Michele Landry (Dieppe Family Medicine Unit, Vitalité Health Network, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada) about the paper that he co-authored in the November issue of Medical Education: 'Improving the recruitment and retention of doctors by training medical students locally' by Michel Landry, Aurel Schofield, Rachel Bordage, Mathieu Bélanger. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.11...

15 MIN2011 OCT 20
Comments
Improving the recruitment and retention of doctors by training medical students locally

Medical students’ experiences of shame in professional enculturation

Despite the intentions of caregivers not to harm, medical encounters may involve intimidation and induce emotions of shame. Reflection is a critical part of professional learning and training. However, the role of shame in medical education has scarcely been studied. The aim of this study was to explore medical students’ reflections on shame-related experiences in clinical situations and to examine how they tackled these experiences. Kevin Eva, Editor in Chief of Medical Education, speaks to Ulf Lindström (Division of Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden) who is the co-author of the following paper appearing in the October 2011 issue of Medical Education: 'Medical students’ experiences of shame in professional enculturation' by Ulf H Lindström, Katarina Hamberg, Eva E Johansson. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04022.x/abstract

13 MIN2011 SEP 23
Comments
Medical students’ experiences of shame in professional enculturation

Understanding the behaviour of newly qualified doctors in acute care contexts

A particularly onerous aspect of the transition from medical student to practising doctor concerns the necessity to be able to rapidly identify acutely unwell patients and initiate appropriate resuscitation. These are skills in which many graduates feel poorly prepared and are considered by some to be best learned on the job. This constructivist study investigated the factors that influence the behaviour of junior doctors in this context and initiated the development of a framework that promotes understanding of this important area. Editor in Chief of Medical Education, Kevin Eva, speaks to Dr Victoria Tallentire (Centre for Medical Education, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK) who is the co-author of the following paper published in the October 2011 issue of Medical Education: 'Understanding the behaviour of newly qualified doctors in acute care contexts' by Victoria Tallentire, Samantha Smith, Janet Skinner and Helen Cameron. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi...

11 MIN2011 SEP 23
Comments
Understanding the behaviour of newly qualified doctors in acute care contexts

Teaching operating room conflict management to surgeons: clarifying the optimal approach

Conflict management has been identified as an essential competence for surgeons as they work in operating room (OR) teams; however, the optimal approach is unclear. Social science research offers two alternatives, the first of which recommends that task-related conflict be managed using problem-solving techniques while avoiding relationship conflict. The other approach advocates for the active management of relationship conflict as it almost always accompanies task-related conflict. Clarity about the optimal management strategy can be gained through a better understanding of conflict transformation, or the inter-relationship between conflict types, in this specific setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate conflict transformation in OR teams in order to clarify the approach most appropriate for an educational conflict management programme for surgeons. Editor in Chief Kevin Eva speaks to David Rogers (Department of Surgery, Faculty of School of Medicine, Southern Illinois U...

14 MIN2011 AUG 22
Comments
Teaching operating room conflict management to surgeons: clarifying the optimal approach

Putting the expert together again

The study of expertise in medical education has a long history of success. Researchers have identified and elaborated on many dimensions of expert performance. In part, this success has derived from researchers’ ability to effectively isolate the dimensions and explore each separately. Although this deconstruction of the expert has been successful, the need to recombine the dimensions of expertise as part of an integrated construct of expert practice has recently become an increasingly evident imperative in health professions education. The Editor in Chief Kevin Eva, speaks to Maria Mylopoulos (Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) about the article she co-authored in the September issue of Medical Education entitled: ‘Putting the expert together again’ by Maria Mylopoulos and Glenn Regehr. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04032.x/abstract

8 MIN2011 AUG 22
Comments
Putting the expert together again

Fifty years of medical education research: waves of migration

Kevin Eva, Editor in Chief of Medical Education talks to Geoff Norman (Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada), recent Karolinska award winner about his paper in the August issue of Medical Education: Fifty years of medical education research: waves of migration. Medical education research has been an academic pursuit for over 50 years, tracing its roots back to the Office of Medical Education at the State University of New York at Buffalo, New York, with George Miller. As the field has matured, the nature of the questions posed and the disciplinary bases of its practitioners have evolved. Geoff Norman looks at three chronological ‘generations’ of academics who have contributed to the field, at intervals of roughly 10–15 years. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2010.03921.x/abstract

11 MIN2011 JUL 22
Comments
Fifty years of medical education research: waves of migration

Looking back to the future: a message for a new generation of medical educators

Kevin Eva, Editor in Chief of Medical Education, speaks to Professor Ron Harden, the General Secretary of AMEE, and Professor of Medical Education at University of Dundee, amongst many other roles. This podcasts forms one of three commissioned articles for the August issue of Medical Education from the first three Karolinska prizewinners. The challenge for these authors in writing the articles was to reflect on their careers within medical education, and how they believe medical education has changed over the years and what the future may hold. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.03934.x/abstract

14 MIN2011 JUL 22
Comments
Looking back to the future: a message for a new generation of medical educators

Latest Episodes

Medical students’ illness-related cognitions

Doctors do not follow guidance when managing their own health and illness. This behaviour may start at medical school. This study aimed to investigate whether inappropriate responses to illness are an issue for medical students and, if so, to identify the determinants of students’ responses to illness. Editor in Chief of Medical Education, Kevin Eva speaks to Sarah Ross (Division of Medical and Dental Education, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK) about her co-authored paper focusing on medical students’ illnesses and treatment of their own health, published in the December issue: ‘Medical students’ illness-related cognitions’ by Sarah Ross, Martin von Fragstein and Jennifer Cleland. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04079.x/abstract

13 MIN2011 NOV 30
Comments
Medical students’ illness-related cognitions

Culture in medical education: comparing a Thai and a Canadian residency programme

Globalisation initiatives in medical education are premised on a universal model of medical education. This study was conducted to challenge this premise by empirically examining the impact of culture on the practice of medical education in anaesthesia residency training programmes in Thailand and Canada. Editor in Chief of Medical Education speaks to Dr Anne Wong (Department of Anaesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) about the cultural contexts in her paper published in the December issue of the journal ‘Culture in medical education: comparing a Thai and a Canadian residency programme’. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04059.x/abstract

16 MIN2011 NOV 30
Comments
Culture in medical education: comparing a Thai and a Canadian residency programme

Educational interventions to improve handover in health care: a systematic review

Effective handover within the health care setting is vital to patient safety. Despite published literature discussing strategies to improve handover, the extent to which educational interventions have been used and how such interventions relate to the published theoretical models of handover remain unclear. These issues were investigated through a systematic review of the literature. Editor in Chief Kevin Eva speaks to Morris Gordon (Faculty of Health and Social Care, University of Salford, Salford, UK) about the paper he co-authored in the November 2011 issue of Medical Education: 'Educational interventions to improve handover in health care: a systematic review' by Morris Gordon and Rebecca Findley. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04049.x/abstract

17 MIN2011 OCT 20
Comments
Educational interventions to improve handover in health care: a systematic review

Improving the recruitment and retention of doctors by training medical students locally

The global shortage of doctors is of concern. This is particularly true in French-speaking regions of New Brunswick, Canada, where there is no medical school. Since 1981, francophone medical students from New Brunswick have been able to undertake part of their training in their province through an agreement with medical schools in another province. We studied the effects of frequency and length of exposure to the province of origin during medical training on the likelihood that a doctor will ever or currently practise medicine in that province. Editor in Chief Kevin Eva, speaks to Professor Michele Landry (Dieppe Family Medicine Unit, Vitalité Health Network, Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada) about the paper that he co-authored in the November issue of Medical Education: 'Improving the recruitment and retention of doctors by training medical students locally' by Michel Landry, Aurel Schofield, Rachel Bordage, Mathieu Bélanger. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.11...

15 MIN2011 OCT 20
Comments
Improving the recruitment and retention of doctors by training medical students locally

Medical students’ experiences of shame in professional enculturation

Despite the intentions of caregivers not to harm, medical encounters may involve intimidation and induce emotions of shame. Reflection is a critical part of professional learning and training. However, the role of shame in medical education has scarcely been studied. The aim of this study was to explore medical students’ reflections on shame-related experiences in clinical situations and to examine how they tackled these experiences. Kevin Eva, Editor in Chief of Medical Education, speaks to Ulf Lindström (Division of Family Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden) who is the co-author of the following paper appearing in the October 2011 issue of Medical Education: 'Medical students’ experiences of shame in professional enculturation' by Ulf H Lindström, Katarina Hamberg, Eva E Johansson. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04022.x/abstract

13 MIN2011 SEP 23
Comments
Medical students’ experiences of shame in professional enculturation

Understanding the behaviour of newly qualified doctors in acute care contexts

A particularly onerous aspect of the transition from medical student to practising doctor concerns the necessity to be able to rapidly identify acutely unwell patients and initiate appropriate resuscitation. These are skills in which many graduates feel poorly prepared and are considered by some to be best learned on the job. This constructivist study investigated the factors that influence the behaviour of junior doctors in this context and initiated the development of a framework that promotes understanding of this important area. Editor in Chief of Medical Education, Kevin Eva, speaks to Dr Victoria Tallentire (Centre for Medical Education, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK) who is the co-author of the following paper published in the October 2011 issue of Medical Education: 'Understanding the behaviour of newly qualified doctors in acute care contexts' by Victoria Tallentire, Samantha Smith, Janet Skinner and Helen Cameron. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi...

11 MIN2011 SEP 23
Comments
Understanding the behaviour of newly qualified doctors in acute care contexts

Teaching operating room conflict management to surgeons: clarifying the optimal approach

Conflict management has been identified as an essential competence for surgeons as they work in operating room (OR) teams; however, the optimal approach is unclear. Social science research offers two alternatives, the first of which recommends that task-related conflict be managed using problem-solving techniques while avoiding relationship conflict. The other approach advocates for the active management of relationship conflict as it almost always accompanies task-related conflict. Clarity about the optimal management strategy can be gained through a better understanding of conflict transformation, or the inter-relationship between conflict types, in this specific setting. The purpose of this study was to evaluate conflict transformation in OR teams in order to clarify the approach most appropriate for an educational conflict management programme for surgeons. Editor in Chief Kevin Eva speaks to David Rogers (Department of Surgery, Faculty of School of Medicine, Southern Illinois U...

14 MIN2011 AUG 22
Comments
Teaching operating room conflict management to surgeons: clarifying the optimal approach

Putting the expert together again

The study of expertise in medical education has a long history of success. Researchers have identified and elaborated on many dimensions of expert performance. In part, this success has derived from researchers’ ability to effectively isolate the dimensions and explore each separately. Although this deconstruction of the expert has been successful, the need to recombine the dimensions of expertise as part of an integrated construct of expert practice has recently become an increasingly evident imperative in health professions education. The Editor in Chief Kevin Eva, speaks to Maria Mylopoulos (Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) about the article she co-authored in the September issue of Medical Education entitled: ‘Putting the expert together again’ by Maria Mylopoulos and Glenn Regehr. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04032.x/abstract

8 MIN2011 AUG 22
Comments
Putting the expert together again

Fifty years of medical education research: waves of migration

Kevin Eva, Editor in Chief of Medical Education talks to Geoff Norman (Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada), recent Karolinska award winner about his paper in the August issue of Medical Education: Fifty years of medical education research: waves of migration. Medical education research has been an academic pursuit for over 50 years, tracing its roots back to the Office of Medical Education at the State University of New York at Buffalo, New York, with George Miller. As the field has matured, the nature of the questions posed and the disciplinary bases of its practitioners have evolved. Geoff Norman looks at three chronological ‘generations’ of academics who have contributed to the field, at intervals of roughly 10–15 years. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2010.03921.x/abstract

11 MIN2011 JUL 22
Comments
Fifty years of medical education research: waves of migration

Looking back to the future: a message for a new generation of medical educators

Kevin Eva, Editor in Chief of Medical Education, speaks to Professor Ron Harden, the General Secretary of AMEE, and Professor of Medical Education at University of Dundee, amongst many other roles. This podcasts forms one of three commissioned articles for the August issue of Medical Education from the first three Karolinska prizewinners. The challenge for these authors in writing the articles was to reflect on their careers within medical education, and how they believe medical education has changed over the years and what the future may hold. Read the paper: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.03934.x/abstract

14 MIN2011 JUL 22
Comments
Looking back to the future: a message for a new generation of medical educators
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