title

The Short Coat Podcast

Dave Etler and the Students of the University of I

7
Followers
2
Plays
The Short Coat Podcast
The Short Coat Podcast

The Short Coat Podcast

Dave Etler and the Students of the University of I

7
Followers
2
Plays
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About Us

Broadcasts from the amazing and intense world of medical school.

Latest Episodes

A Stitch In Time Saves Swine.

ETwo questions this week from Short Coats! Listener Luis wrote in to ask what books co-hosts Hillary O'Brien, Kylie Miller, Emma Barr and newbie Sahaana Arumugam consulted to find their paths. And Mia wrote to theshortcoats@gmail.com to find out more about MS/DO or MS/MD programs and what they look for in their applicants. And can we find patient-care uses for weird proverbs? No, we can't. But it was fun to try. This Week in Medical News. This week Dave learned about "The Husband Stitch" much to his disgust. North Dakota physicians no longer have to lie to their patients about drug-induced abortions; and long-ignored African DNA is finding its way into gene banks courtesy of a Nigerian health tech startup. We Want to Hear From You. What's going on in your world? We like stories, so call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, or send your questions or comments to theshortcoats@gmail.com!

51 MIN3 days ago
Comments
A Stitch In Time Saves Swine.

Too Idealistic for Medicine?

EFourth-year students David Rudolph and Chandini Reddy join co-hosts Brendan George and LJ Agistonelli to answer listener Krista's question--a self-confessed "loud mouth" with radical hopes about how she'd like to practice medicine one day. Can she bring those ideals to life, or will she be drummed out of medicine. And is it even practical for her to consider this career given her age and background? We've got you, Krista! Plus, Dave asks David and Chandini what they learned from watching their Medical Student Performance Evaluation take shape before it gets sent off to residency programs they're applying to. This Week in Medical News: Weill Cornell joins the list of schools offering med school for free (to some). Napping is good for you, up to a point. And skeletons aren't just scary during Halloween--they seem to be part of the fight-or-flight response in a rather big way. We Want to Hear From You: so, how are you? Tell us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

59 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Too Idealistic for Medicine?

Get to Know the Nurse, Save Yourself from Grief

EA cliche, of course, but true. Because without the nurses (and other people) doing their jobs to help the doctor, the doctor can't do nuthin'--no IVs, no regular BP checks, no comfortable patients, no monitoring while they're home sleeping, no nothing. Listener Amber stops by to ask what med students learn about nurses and how to work with them, and of course M4s Hillary O'Brien and Kylie Miller and new M1 co-hosts Jessica De Haan and Greta Becker are happy to help. And Fifi Trixiebell returns, craving med school war stories. Also, Hillary and Kylie discuss the residency personal statements they wrote and where they sought help. Do you have war stories to share? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime to tell us. We'll play them for Fifi (and whoever else is listening).

54 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Get to Know the Nurse, Save Yourself from Grief

Terms and Conditions Apply

ECo-host and MD/PhD student Miranda Schene is a woman who has obviously been raised well. So when her mother, Ginny, wrote to theshortcoats@gmail.com asking about the surprises med school had in store for this week's gang, Dave--who also loves his mother--couldn't very well say no! M1 Nathan Spitz and M2 Jenna Mullins, along with new co-host M1 Bryn Myers join in to give Mama Ginny the deets. Plus Dave asks if his co-hosts can find and supply doctors' testimonials for some As-Seen-On-TV products. This Week in Medical News: The plight of a Colorado prisoner sheds more light on the abysmal healthcare incarcerated mothers-to-be get. And some interesting case studies show why it might not be a good idea to keep roosters in your backyard if you have varicose veins; and what a diet of chips, fries, and sausages can do to your eyes. We Want to Hear From You! What are your favorite case studies? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com. Dave can't get enough!

56 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Terms and Conditions Apply

Medicine Has a DARK Past

ESome of the most important contributions to knowledge have come at a terrible price. The BBC featured a story on their site about an anatomy atlas that was created by a Nazi doctor, and the images within are those of hundreds of dissected political prisoners. The very conditions in Hitler's concentration camps may have been among the reasons why these illustrations are so detailed. It is a terrible piece of work. This book, now out of print for decades, is still on the shelves of surgeons and consulted (if rather furtively) when they run out of other options. But we have to ask--can its vast utility outweigh it's evil origins? Short Coats, we'd love to hear your thoughts. Plus the gang visits Yahoo! Answers to practice their patient-communication skills, sort of. Pharmaceutical giants Johnson & Johnson and Purdue Pharma were both in the news recently as opioid manufacturers who will be paying millions for their roles in the opioid epidemic. And a study suggests intermittent fasting ...

49 MINSEP 13
Comments
Medicine Has a DARK Past

Elders Need Docs Who Understand Them (ft. Louise Aronson, MD)

EElders are not just sickly adults. Ours is an aging society, and as the populations skews older, medicine has begun to realize that treating elder patients isn't the same as treating adults or children. Treating the conditions of older people means that clinicians have to understand them in ways that go beyond diseases and drugs. Hence, the science of geriatrics. Dr. Louise Aronson is a geriatrician and the author of Elderhood: Redefining Aging, Transforming Medicine, Reimagining Life (Bloomsbury 2019). It's a beautifully written book the focuses on the stories of our elders and what they can teach us about their needs both biological and psychological. Among the things co-hosts Miranda Schene, Emma Barr, Mason LaMarche and Nick Lind learned: Older people respond in unpredictable ways to medications. Often the work of a geriatrician is to 'deprescribe' medicines that are hurting them. Never undervalue the things that are important to elders just because they aren't medicines or procedures. If the patient needs something from their doctor that increases their success in life, then it's important. Recognizing when you as a doctor are doing things for you, vs. when you're doing things for your patient is important. Older people are no longer beyond help simply due to age. With the right training and an in-depth understanding of the science of aging, huge gains can be made in treating the serious disorders of elderhood. American medicine's concept of "the Good Death" (aka, dying at home surrounded by loved ones) isn't a given for elders. Understanding what elders want, rather than subscribing to some monolithic idea, is important. We Want to Hear From You: Are you considering geriatrics, and why? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

58 MINSEP 5
Comments
Elders Need Docs Who Understand Them (ft. Louise Aronson, MD)

Slipping On The Short Coat

EThe first step in med school Ceremonies are important. If you’re like Dave, you think they’re a bit of a pain–you have to dress up and keep a straight face. But as a bit of (lengthy) symbolism, they do have their place, and the White Coat Ceremony is no exception. Maddie Mix and Aline Sandouk reflect on their White Coat Ceremonies and what it meant to them to be standing up in front of those theyadmired, respected, and loved, and promised to essentially selflessly give their lives to medicine in return for admiration, respect, and love of their own. Of course, since Aline got kicked out of Cedar Rapids’ Paramount Theater for using her cell phone by a very angry usher, I guess that respect and love she can expect from others will only go so far. It makes a good story, though, and was totally offset by a bit of feedback she got from a listener. Remember–you can send questions or feedback to theshortcoats@gmail.com! We love it! Buy Our Merch and Give At The Same Time You care abou...

45 MINAUG 29
Comments
Slipping On The Short Coat

Think Ahead to Save Your Soul

EBrandon Bacalzo and Angeline Vanle join the team as incoming medical students. Luckily for them they have the chance to put questions about med school to M2 Nick Lind and M3 Brady Campbell, including how to find the new study habits they'll need to succeed. Ethical objections to a controversial practice in medical education have been simmering for a while, so we discuss how medical students should prepare for potential dilemmas that may occur during their training. And Dave is snared by clickbait yet again--because who wouldn't want to know more about how tickling elders could keep them young? And are there other kinds of stimulation we should study to cure disease? Artificial intelligence is always fun, so we try out an app that measures your stress level, pulse, and (one-day) your blood pressure just by looking at your face. We Want to Hear From You: What are (were) you thinking about when you started medical school? Did your hopes and fears pan out? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com. Do all three!

61 MINAUG 22
Comments
Think Ahead to Save Your Soul

Cracking Open the Firehose

EFor those who have been out of the student game for a while, or who feel they need a little extra time to get acclimated to the fast pace of medical education, there are programs like our Intro to Medical Education at Iowa. Whatever an individual school calls it, these programs can act as a bridge between your life before med school to the rigours of learning medicine. On this episode that Dave forgot to release a while back because he went on vacation, we meet pre-M1s in our program, Nicole Lacina, Timothy Morris, and Alec James. They and their teaching assistant, regular co-host Jacob Chrestensen are here to have some fun and describe what it's like to crack the firehose with this program instead of taking it full in the face. Plus, Dave's unreasonable susceptibility to clickbait leads him to make up a new game. Can the co-hosts get him to click on their article with their crazy headlines? Yes. Yes, they can. We Want to Hear From You: Are you starting med school this fall? What did you do to prepare yourself? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

74 MINAUG 15
Comments
Cracking Open the Firehose

Millennials may be changing healthcare (ft. Martin Makary, MD)

EContinuing our recent discussion on the price of healthcare in the United States, on this episode we talk with Dr. Martin Makary. Dr. Makary is a surgeon at Johns Hopkins, a best-selling author, and a health policy expert. Dr. Makary's latest book entitled The Price We Pay: What Broke American Health Care--and How to Fix It, is due out in September. We were so glad to talk with him, because it's all-too-easy to be jaded about the 'business' of healthcare when one in five Americans are in collections over healthcare debt. But Dr. Makary combines outrage at the market forces that have created a used-car-lot sales environment with optimism about healthcare's future prospects for transparency and fairness. Things are changing, he says! Interestingly, the medical students doing research with him--pouring their hearts, souls, and minds into it--have helped to create that sense of optimism in him. In other words, millennials may be saving American healthcare even as they're killing the napkin and real estate industries. On top of all that, while The Price We Pay is an indictment of the insurance and billing practices that hinder the work of doctors and the healing of patients, the book is also a guidebook to the things that can and are being done to restore medicine's mission.

58 MINJUL 26
Comments
Millennials may be changing healthcare (ft. Martin Makary, MD)

Latest Episodes

A Stitch In Time Saves Swine.

ETwo questions this week from Short Coats! Listener Luis wrote in to ask what books co-hosts Hillary O'Brien, Kylie Miller, Emma Barr and newbie Sahaana Arumugam consulted to find their paths. And Mia wrote to theshortcoats@gmail.com to find out more about MS/DO or MS/MD programs and what they look for in their applicants. And can we find patient-care uses for weird proverbs? No, we can't. But it was fun to try. This Week in Medical News. This week Dave learned about "The Husband Stitch" much to his disgust. North Dakota physicians no longer have to lie to their patients about drug-induced abortions; and long-ignored African DNA is finding its way into gene banks courtesy of a Nigerian health tech startup. We Want to Hear From You. What's going on in your world? We like stories, so call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, or send your questions or comments to theshortcoats@gmail.com!

51 MIN3 days ago
Comments
A Stitch In Time Saves Swine.

Too Idealistic for Medicine?

EFourth-year students David Rudolph and Chandini Reddy join co-hosts Brendan George and LJ Agistonelli to answer listener Krista's question--a self-confessed "loud mouth" with radical hopes about how she'd like to practice medicine one day. Can she bring those ideals to life, or will she be drummed out of medicine. And is it even practical for her to consider this career given her age and background? We've got you, Krista! Plus, Dave asks David and Chandini what they learned from watching their Medical Student Performance Evaluation take shape before it gets sent off to residency programs they're applying to. This Week in Medical News: Weill Cornell joins the list of schools offering med school for free (to some). Napping is good for you, up to a point. And skeletons aren't just scary during Halloween--they seem to be part of the fight-or-flight response in a rather big way. We Want to Hear From You: so, how are you? Tell us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

59 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Too Idealistic for Medicine?

Get to Know the Nurse, Save Yourself from Grief

EA cliche, of course, but true. Because without the nurses (and other people) doing their jobs to help the doctor, the doctor can't do nuthin'--no IVs, no regular BP checks, no comfortable patients, no monitoring while they're home sleeping, no nothing. Listener Amber stops by to ask what med students learn about nurses and how to work with them, and of course M4s Hillary O'Brien and Kylie Miller and new M1 co-hosts Jessica De Haan and Greta Becker are happy to help. And Fifi Trixiebell returns, craving med school war stories. Also, Hillary and Kylie discuss the residency personal statements they wrote and where they sought help. Do you have war stories to share? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime to tell us. We'll play them for Fifi (and whoever else is listening).

54 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Get to Know the Nurse, Save Yourself from Grief

Terms and Conditions Apply

ECo-host and MD/PhD student Miranda Schene is a woman who has obviously been raised well. So when her mother, Ginny, wrote to theshortcoats@gmail.com asking about the surprises med school had in store for this week's gang, Dave--who also loves his mother--couldn't very well say no! M1 Nathan Spitz and M2 Jenna Mullins, along with new co-host M1 Bryn Myers join in to give Mama Ginny the deets. Plus Dave asks if his co-hosts can find and supply doctors' testimonials for some As-Seen-On-TV products. This Week in Medical News: The plight of a Colorado prisoner sheds more light on the abysmal healthcare incarcerated mothers-to-be get. And some interesting case studies show why it might not be a good idea to keep roosters in your backyard if you have varicose veins; and what a diet of chips, fries, and sausages can do to your eyes. We Want to Hear From You! What are your favorite case studies? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com. Dave can't get enough!

56 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Terms and Conditions Apply

Medicine Has a DARK Past

ESome of the most important contributions to knowledge have come at a terrible price. The BBC featured a story on their site about an anatomy atlas that was created by a Nazi doctor, and the images within are those of hundreds of dissected political prisoners. The very conditions in Hitler's concentration camps may have been among the reasons why these illustrations are so detailed. It is a terrible piece of work. This book, now out of print for decades, is still on the shelves of surgeons and consulted (if rather furtively) when they run out of other options. But we have to ask--can its vast utility outweigh it's evil origins? Short Coats, we'd love to hear your thoughts. Plus the gang visits Yahoo! Answers to practice their patient-communication skills, sort of. Pharmaceutical giants Johnson & Johnson and Purdue Pharma were both in the news recently as opioid manufacturers who will be paying millions for their roles in the opioid epidemic. And a study suggests intermittent fasting ...

49 MINSEP 13
Comments
Medicine Has a DARK Past

Elders Need Docs Who Understand Them (ft. Louise Aronson, MD)

EElders are not just sickly adults. Ours is an aging society, and as the populations skews older, medicine has begun to realize that treating elder patients isn't the same as treating adults or children. Treating the conditions of older people means that clinicians have to understand them in ways that go beyond diseases and drugs. Hence, the science of geriatrics. Dr. Louise Aronson is a geriatrician and the author of Elderhood: Redefining Aging, Transforming Medicine, Reimagining Life (Bloomsbury 2019). It's a beautifully written book the focuses on the stories of our elders and what they can teach us about their needs both biological and psychological. Among the things co-hosts Miranda Schene, Emma Barr, Mason LaMarche and Nick Lind learned: Older people respond in unpredictable ways to medications. Often the work of a geriatrician is to 'deprescribe' medicines that are hurting them. Never undervalue the things that are important to elders just because they aren't medicines or procedures. If the patient needs something from their doctor that increases their success in life, then it's important. Recognizing when you as a doctor are doing things for you, vs. when you're doing things for your patient is important. Older people are no longer beyond help simply due to age. With the right training and an in-depth understanding of the science of aging, huge gains can be made in treating the serious disorders of elderhood. American medicine's concept of "the Good Death" (aka, dying at home surrounded by loved ones) isn't a given for elders. Understanding what elders want, rather than subscribing to some monolithic idea, is important. We Want to Hear From You: Are you considering geriatrics, and why? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

58 MINSEP 5
Comments
Elders Need Docs Who Understand Them (ft. Louise Aronson, MD)

Slipping On The Short Coat

EThe first step in med school Ceremonies are important. If you’re like Dave, you think they’re a bit of a pain–you have to dress up and keep a straight face. But as a bit of (lengthy) symbolism, they do have their place, and the White Coat Ceremony is no exception. Maddie Mix and Aline Sandouk reflect on their White Coat Ceremonies and what it meant to them to be standing up in front of those theyadmired, respected, and loved, and promised to essentially selflessly give their lives to medicine in return for admiration, respect, and love of their own. Of course, since Aline got kicked out of Cedar Rapids’ Paramount Theater for using her cell phone by a very angry usher, I guess that respect and love she can expect from others will only go so far. It makes a good story, though, and was totally offset by a bit of feedback she got from a listener. Remember–you can send questions or feedback to theshortcoats@gmail.com! We love it! Buy Our Merch and Give At The Same Time You care abou...

45 MINAUG 29
Comments
Slipping On The Short Coat

Think Ahead to Save Your Soul

EBrandon Bacalzo and Angeline Vanle join the team as incoming medical students. Luckily for them they have the chance to put questions about med school to M2 Nick Lind and M3 Brady Campbell, including how to find the new study habits they'll need to succeed. Ethical objections to a controversial practice in medical education have been simmering for a while, so we discuss how medical students should prepare for potential dilemmas that may occur during their training. And Dave is snared by clickbait yet again--because who wouldn't want to know more about how tickling elders could keep them young? And are there other kinds of stimulation we should study to cure disease? Artificial intelligence is always fun, so we try out an app that measures your stress level, pulse, and (one-day) your blood pressure just by looking at your face. We Want to Hear From You: What are (were) you thinking about when you started medical school? Did your hopes and fears pan out? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com. Do all three!

61 MINAUG 22
Comments
Think Ahead to Save Your Soul

Cracking Open the Firehose

EFor those who have been out of the student game for a while, or who feel they need a little extra time to get acclimated to the fast pace of medical education, there are programs like our Intro to Medical Education at Iowa. Whatever an individual school calls it, these programs can act as a bridge between your life before med school to the rigours of learning medicine. On this episode that Dave forgot to release a while back because he went on vacation, we meet pre-M1s in our program, Nicole Lacina, Timothy Morris, and Alec James. They and their teaching assistant, regular co-host Jacob Chrestensen are here to have some fun and describe what it's like to crack the firehose with this program instead of taking it full in the face. Plus, Dave's unreasonable susceptibility to clickbait leads him to make up a new game. Can the co-hosts get him to click on their article with their crazy headlines? Yes. Yes, they can. We Want to Hear From You: Are you starting med school this fall? What did you do to prepare yourself? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

74 MINAUG 15
Comments
Cracking Open the Firehose

Millennials may be changing healthcare (ft. Martin Makary, MD)

EContinuing our recent discussion on the price of healthcare in the United States, on this episode we talk with Dr. Martin Makary. Dr. Makary is a surgeon at Johns Hopkins, a best-selling author, and a health policy expert. Dr. Makary's latest book entitled The Price We Pay: What Broke American Health Care--and How to Fix It, is due out in September. We were so glad to talk with him, because it's all-too-easy to be jaded about the 'business' of healthcare when one in five Americans are in collections over healthcare debt. But Dr. Makary combines outrage at the market forces that have created a used-car-lot sales environment with optimism about healthcare's future prospects for transparency and fairness. Things are changing, he says! Interestingly, the medical students doing research with him--pouring their hearts, souls, and minds into it--have helped to create that sense of optimism in him. In other words, millennials may be saving American healthcare even as they're killing the napkin and real estate industries. On top of all that, while The Price We Pay is an indictment of the insurance and billing practices that hinder the work of doctors and the healing of patients, the book is also a guidebook to the things that can and are being done to restore medicine's mission.

58 MINJUL 26
Comments
Millennials may be changing healthcare (ft. Martin Makary, MD)