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Wolfson College Science Society

Cambridge University

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Wolfson College Science Society
Wolfson College Science Society

Wolfson College Science Society

Cambridge University

1
Followers
0
Plays
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About Us

Latest Episodes

Dr. Whitney Scott: “The role of perceived injustice in chronic pain: Outcomes, mechanisms, and opportunities for intervention"

This presentation will review a growing body of cross-sectional, prospective, and experimental data to show the negative impact of injustice perceptions on the experience of pain and chronic pain-related adjustment. Processes linking perceived injustice to adverse pain outcomes will be identified. Potential avenues for clinical intervention be discussed.

46 MIN2015 DEC 10
Comments
Dr. Whitney Scott: “The role of perceived injustice in chronic pain: Outcomes, mechanisms, and opportunities for intervention"

Jan Filochowski : Thoughts on the current crisis in the NHS and how to resolve it: getting from lose/lose to win/win

Jan Filochowski, a senior member of Wolfson College, who has 40 years of experience in the NHS, 20 as an NHS CEO in a wide variety of contexts and organisations. He talks about how serious the present situation in the NHS is, the conflicting and contradictory requirements it currently faces, the mismatch between supply and demand, what is wrong with the current NHS business model, and, most importantly, how to get the right one.

41 MIN2015 NOV 16
Comments
Jan Filochowski : Thoughts on the current crisis in the NHS and how to resolve it: getting from lose/lose to win/win

Dr. Pradipta Biswas: ‘Inclusive Human Computer Interaction - from Indian farmers to Eurofighter Typhoon pilots’

Human Computer Interaction (HCI) is a multi-disciplinary field investigating the boundary between man and machine. With the advent of electronic interactive technologies during past decade, the field turns ever more relevant and important. This talk will present HCI issues for a few special cases where conventional interactive devices and user interfaces do not work. The use cases will include people with severe physical impairment, farmers in India and pilots of Eurofighter Typhoon combat aircraft. The talk will introduce a concept called user modelling, that helps to personalize user interfaces for people with different range of abilities and contexts of use. The personalization feature is further augmented with intelligent interactive systems where users can control electronic interfaces simply by looking, gesturing and talking to it. The talk will conclude with a few demonstration videos of our recent multi-modal adaptive systems.

56 MIN2014 MAY 30
Comments
Dr. Pradipta Biswas: ‘Inclusive Human Computer Interaction - from Indian farmers to Eurofighter Typhoon pilots’

Dr Pau Figueras: May the force (of gravity) be with you: general relativity, black holes and beyond

Black holes are one of the most fascinating objects in Nature, so much so that they often feature in science fiction movies! But, why is that we find them so interesting? In this talk I will explain what is our current understanding of black holes in General Relativity, Einstein’s theory of gravity. As we shall see, black holes are extremely simple objects and yet they encode some of the greatest mysteries of gravity. Their “blackness” makes them very hard to see, but as I will explain, in the near future we may be able to “hear” them. It turns out that the interest in black holes goes beyond their traditional playground in astrophysics. According to recent developments, black holes encode properties of theories of particles, fluids (and turbulence) and superconductors!

54 MIN2014 MAR 10
Comments
Dr Pau Figueras: May the force (of gravity) be with you: general relativity, black holes and beyond

Dr Hannah Siddle : How does cancer become an infectious disease?

An aggressive contagious cancer has emerged in the Tasmanian devil, a carnivorous marsupial endemic to the island of Tasmania. Known as Devil Facial Tumour Disease or DFTD , the disease is characterised by the rapid growth of large and disfiguring tumours around the face and neck of host devils, causing close to 100% mortality and rapid decline of the Tasmanian devil population. Naturally occurring contagious cancers, where tumour cells pass between individuals, are rare as the vertebrate immune system is very good at detecting and destroying foreign cells, just as it detects pathogens. We have been investigating how DFTD cells so successfully evade the host devil immune system, allowing the tumour cells to pass between devils and quickly establish new tumours. Based on these studies we are developing a vaccine that could rescue the Tasmanian devil in the wild and our findings may also have implications for understanding other advanced, drug and immunotherapy resistant tumours.

55 MIN2013 DEC 9
Comments
Dr Hannah Siddle : How does cancer become an infectious disease?

Professor Ben Allanach: The Dark Matter Mystery and the Large Hadron Collider

The existence of dark matter solves some mysteries in astronomical observations, and fits in with the measurements of the afterglow of the big bang. Otherwise, it is hypothetical stuff for which there is currently no direct evidence. In this talk, we shall go on a journey to the unimaginably huge and the incredibly tiny, from back to a blink in an eye after the big bang to the present day. Along the way, I shall describe one of the main reasons that we believe in dark matter, and describe how the Large Hadron Collider might feasibly produce enough of it to study. We shall also visit the discovery of the Higgs boson, and explore why it is important.

57 MIN2013 NOV 12
Comments
Professor Ben Allanach: The Dark Matter Mystery and the Large Hadron Collider

Professor John Barrow: The Origin and Evolution of the Universe

We will describe the modern picture of the expanding universe and the astronomical evidence for it. The inflationary universe theory will be described in simple terms together with the evidence for it and how this theory leads to the concept of the multiverse.

59 MIN2013 OCT 28
Comments
Professor John Barrow: The Origin and Evolution of the Universe

Dr Samuel Aaron: Sonic Pi: Teaching Computer Science with Music

In the UK the school education system is experiencing radical reform. This is particularly the case with computing. There’s momentum to separate ICT from Computer Science and to place specific emphasis on the teaching of Computational Thinking. In broad terms, we shouldn’t just be teaching our children office skills such as formatting Word documents – we should be teaching them how to code and create their own software. This talk introduces Sonic Pi, a music language and environment running on the Raspberry Pi specifically focussed on introducing core Computer Science concepts for KS3 students. Sonic Pi emphasises the importance of creativity in pedagogic contexts enabling learners to exhibit self-agency through the application of the taught ideas in musical works they create and own. Sonic Pi is currently being trialled by schools. We will discuss some early observations and initial success stories of using music and composition as a means for both introducing technical concepts...

61 MIN2013 JUN 18
Comments
Dr Samuel Aaron: Sonic Pi: Teaching Computer Science with Music

Dr Andrew Herbert OBE: EDSAC: The World's First Practical Electronic Digital Computer

It is not generally known that the world’s first practical ‘stored program electronic digital computer” was designed and built in Cambridge by a team at the University’s Mathematical Laboratory between 1947 and 1949. Building on wartime expertise in radar electronics, the Cambridge team, led by M.V. Wilkes, designed a machine that embodied all the elements we expect to find in a modern computer. Of course EDDSAC was on a different scale: built using thermionic valves, it filled a large room; it’s memory was tiny, just 512 words; and its processor puny, running at a pedestrian 500KHz. But, in comparison to the hand calculators and other mechanical computers it replaced, EDSAC was a 1,500-fold speed up – perhaps the largest single leap in computing power ever seen. EDSAC ran for 10 years, helping 3 Cambridge scientists secure their Nobel prizes and starting many famous computer scientists on their careers. Scrapped after 10 years to make room for the next machine, very little of...

63 MIN2013 JUN 3
Comments
Dr Andrew Herbert OBE: EDSAC: The World's First Practical Electronic Digital Computer

Professor Paul Murdin: Planetary landscapes

Mankind has stood on, viewed and photographed only one other world beyond the Earth – the Moon – but has explored others out to the planet Saturn by proxy, with landed cameras, some on mobile robots able to venture into dramatic places. Yet other planetary explorations have been by remote mapping from orbiting satellites that produce files of scientific data that can be viewed as pictures. This effort has built up into a large number of little-known but stunning planetary landscape pictures that represent what you would see if, as a space tourist, you visited these alien worlds. In this talk I explore the scientific reality in this extraterrestrial scenery. In parallel I consider how the presentation of that reality in these extraterrestrial landscapes has been formed by the way space scientists and spacecraft controllers have viewed, been influenced by and remembered pictures of terrestrial scenery created by the landscape painters of art history.

60 MIN2013 MAY 20
Comments
Professor Paul Murdin: Planetary landscapes

Latest Episodes

Dr. Whitney Scott: “The role of perceived injustice in chronic pain: Outcomes, mechanisms, and opportunities for intervention"

This presentation will review a growing body of cross-sectional, prospective, and experimental data to show the negative impact of injustice perceptions on the experience of pain and chronic pain-related adjustment. Processes linking perceived injustice to adverse pain outcomes will be identified. Potential avenues for clinical intervention be discussed.

46 MIN2015 DEC 10
Comments
Dr. Whitney Scott: “The role of perceived injustice in chronic pain: Outcomes, mechanisms, and opportunities for intervention"

Jan Filochowski : Thoughts on the current crisis in the NHS and how to resolve it: getting from lose/lose to win/win

Jan Filochowski, a senior member of Wolfson College, who has 40 years of experience in the NHS, 20 as an NHS CEO in a wide variety of contexts and organisations. He talks about how serious the present situation in the NHS is, the conflicting and contradictory requirements it currently faces, the mismatch between supply and demand, what is wrong with the current NHS business model, and, most importantly, how to get the right one.

41 MIN2015 NOV 16
Comments
Jan Filochowski : Thoughts on the current crisis in the NHS and how to resolve it: getting from lose/lose to win/win

Dr. Pradipta Biswas: ‘Inclusive Human Computer Interaction - from Indian farmers to Eurofighter Typhoon pilots’

Human Computer Interaction (HCI) is a multi-disciplinary field investigating the boundary between man and machine. With the advent of electronic interactive technologies during past decade, the field turns ever more relevant and important. This talk will present HCI issues for a few special cases where conventional interactive devices and user interfaces do not work. The use cases will include people with severe physical impairment, farmers in India and pilots of Eurofighter Typhoon combat aircraft. The talk will introduce a concept called user modelling, that helps to personalize user interfaces for people with different range of abilities and contexts of use. The personalization feature is further augmented with intelligent interactive systems where users can control electronic interfaces simply by looking, gesturing and talking to it. The talk will conclude with a few demonstration videos of our recent multi-modal adaptive systems.

56 MIN2014 MAY 30
Comments
Dr. Pradipta Biswas: ‘Inclusive Human Computer Interaction - from Indian farmers to Eurofighter Typhoon pilots’

Dr Pau Figueras: May the force (of gravity) be with you: general relativity, black holes and beyond

Black holes are one of the most fascinating objects in Nature, so much so that they often feature in science fiction movies! But, why is that we find them so interesting? In this talk I will explain what is our current understanding of black holes in General Relativity, Einstein’s theory of gravity. As we shall see, black holes are extremely simple objects and yet they encode some of the greatest mysteries of gravity. Their “blackness” makes them very hard to see, but as I will explain, in the near future we may be able to “hear” them. It turns out that the interest in black holes goes beyond their traditional playground in astrophysics. According to recent developments, black holes encode properties of theories of particles, fluids (and turbulence) and superconductors!

54 MIN2014 MAR 10
Comments
Dr Pau Figueras: May the force (of gravity) be with you: general relativity, black holes and beyond

Dr Hannah Siddle : How does cancer become an infectious disease?

An aggressive contagious cancer has emerged in the Tasmanian devil, a carnivorous marsupial endemic to the island of Tasmania. Known as Devil Facial Tumour Disease or DFTD , the disease is characterised by the rapid growth of large and disfiguring tumours around the face and neck of host devils, causing close to 100% mortality and rapid decline of the Tasmanian devil population. Naturally occurring contagious cancers, where tumour cells pass between individuals, are rare as the vertebrate immune system is very good at detecting and destroying foreign cells, just as it detects pathogens. We have been investigating how DFTD cells so successfully evade the host devil immune system, allowing the tumour cells to pass between devils and quickly establish new tumours. Based on these studies we are developing a vaccine that could rescue the Tasmanian devil in the wild and our findings may also have implications for understanding other advanced, drug and immunotherapy resistant tumours.

55 MIN2013 DEC 9
Comments
Dr Hannah Siddle : How does cancer become an infectious disease?

Professor Ben Allanach: The Dark Matter Mystery and the Large Hadron Collider

The existence of dark matter solves some mysteries in astronomical observations, and fits in with the measurements of the afterglow of the big bang. Otherwise, it is hypothetical stuff for which there is currently no direct evidence. In this talk, we shall go on a journey to the unimaginably huge and the incredibly tiny, from back to a blink in an eye after the big bang to the present day. Along the way, I shall describe one of the main reasons that we believe in dark matter, and describe how the Large Hadron Collider might feasibly produce enough of it to study. We shall also visit the discovery of the Higgs boson, and explore why it is important.

57 MIN2013 NOV 12
Comments
Professor Ben Allanach: The Dark Matter Mystery and the Large Hadron Collider

Professor John Barrow: The Origin and Evolution of the Universe

We will describe the modern picture of the expanding universe and the astronomical evidence for it. The inflationary universe theory will be described in simple terms together with the evidence for it and how this theory leads to the concept of the multiverse.

59 MIN2013 OCT 28
Comments
Professor John Barrow: The Origin and Evolution of the Universe

Dr Samuel Aaron: Sonic Pi: Teaching Computer Science with Music

In the UK the school education system is experiencing radical reform. This is particularly the case with computing. There’s momentum to separate ICT from Computer Science and to place specific emphasis on the teaching of Computational Thinking. In broad terms, we shouldn’t just be teaching our children office skills such as formatting Word documents – we should be teaching them how to code and create their own software. This talk introduces Sonic Pi, a music language and environment running on the Raspberry Pi specifically focussed on introducing core Computer Science concepts for KS3 students. Sonic Pi emphasises the importance of creativity in pedagogic contexts enabling learners to exhibit self-agency through the application of the taught ideas in musical works they create and own. Sonic Pi is currently being trialled by schools. We will discuss some early observations and initial success stories of using music and composition as a means for both introducing technical concepts...

61 MIN2013 JUN 18
Comments
Dr Samuel Aaron: Sonic Pi: Teaching Computer Science with Music

Dr Andrew Herbert OBE: EDSAC: The World's First Practical Electronic Digital Computer

It is not generally known that the world’s first practical ‘stored program electronic digital computer” was designed and built in Cambridge by a team at the University’s Mathematical Laboratory between 1947 and 1949. Building on wartime expertise in radar electronics, the Cambridge team, led by M.V. Wilkes, designed a machine that embodied all the elements we expect to find in a modern computer. Of course EDDSAC was on a different scale: built using thermionic valves, it filled a large room; it’s memory was tiny, just 512 words; and its processor puny, running at a pedestrian 500KHz. But, in comparison to the hand calculators and other mechanical computers it replaced, EDSAC was a 1,500-fold speed up – perhaps the largest single leap in computing power ever seen. EDSAC ran for 10 years, helping 3 Cambridge scientists secure their Nobel prizes and starting many famous computer scientists on their careers. Scrapped after 10 years to make room for the next machine, very little of...

63 MIN2013 JUN 3
Comments
Dr Andrew Herbert OBE: EDSAC: The World's First Practical Electronic Digital Computer

Professor Paul Murdin: Planetary landscapes

Mankind has stood on, viewed and photographed only one other world beyond the Earth – the Moon – but has explored others out to the planet Saturn by proxy, with landed cameras, some on mobile robots able to venture into dramatic places. Yet other planetary explorations have been by remote mapping from orbiting satellites that produce files of scientific data that can be viewed as pictures. This effort has built up into a large number of little-known but stunning planetary landscape pictures that represent what you would see if, as a space tourist, you visited these alien worlds. In this talk I explore the scientific reality in this extraterrestrial scenery. In parallel I consider how the presentation of that reality in these extraterrestrial landscapes has been formed by the way space scientists and spacecraft controllers have viewed, been influenced by and remembered pictures of terrestrial scenery created by the landscape painters of art history.

60 MIN2013 MAY 20
Comments
Professor Paul Murdin: Planetary landscapes