title

Dermatology Weekly

MDEdge

6
Followers
375
Plays
Dermatology Weekly
Dermatology Weekly

Dermatology Weekly

MDEdge

6
Followers
375
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

Stay current on medical, surgical, and aesthetic dermatology developments with Dermatology Weekly, a podcast featuring news relevant to the practice of dermatology, and peer-to-peer interviews with Doctor Vincent A. DeLeo, who interviews physician authors from Cutis on topics such as psoriasis, skin cancer, atopic dermatitis, hair and nail disorders, cosmetic procedures, environmental dermatology, contact dermatitis, pigmentation disorders, acne, rosacea, alopecia, practice management, and more. Plus, resident discussions geared toward physicians in-training. Subscribe now. The information in this podcast is provided for informational and educational purposes only.

Latest Episodes

Shampoo products for the skin of color population; statins and skin infections; and adalimumab’s survival benefit in psoriasis

There is a consumer trend to avoid additives in hair care products and consider natural alternatives. Dr. Lynn McKinley-Grant, president of the Skin of Color Society, talks with Dr. Amy McMichael about shampoo ingredients and the importance of cleansing the scalp in the skin of color population. Dr. McMichael also discusses how hairstyling practices in this population can lead to hair loss and damage to the hair shaft. “We just have to be more healthy in our choices of how we do those styles and how we cleanse our scalp and our hair when we’re wearing those styles,” advises Dr. McMichael. We bring you the latest in dermatology news and research: 1. Psoriasis registry data provide evidence that adalimumab reduces mortality 2. Tape strips useful to identify biomarkers in skin of young children with atopic dermatitis 3. Short-term statin use linked to risk of skin and soft tissue infections * * * Things you will learn in this episode: Do patients need to avoid shampoos containing sulfates and parabens? “Sulfates are just one of the many ways that we can cleanse the scalp and the hair. It is a detergent, and when that detergent is removed, in order to cleanse the hair another detergent has to be put into its place,” explains Dr. McMichael There are "no data to suggest that these other detergents are better or safer or even helpful for our hair shaft.” Only patients with a true allergic contact sensitization to parabens need to avoid products with this ingredient. Patients need to understand that the “no-poo” method and dry shampoos are not cleansing the scalp. “There’s an idea that you can shampoo as infrequently as you want,” says Dr. McMichael. “That’s really not true. In order for your scalp to be healthy and to grow healthy hair, you need to have it cleansed. And once weekly is preferred but certainly every 2 weeks is reasonable.” Patients may rinse their hair with water and baking soda, apple cider vinegar, and tea tree oil without knowing how they interact with the bacterial and yeast components on the scalp. “And they can be bad for the hair shaft,” Dr. McMichael adds. Conditioners are not a good replacement for shampoo, especially for patients with a scalp condition. “Conditioners alone are not meant to cleanse,” Dr. McMichael explains. For women of African descent, consider dandruff shampoo products that are manufactured and tested for this patient population. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most prominent form of hair loss in the United States in women of African descent. Clinicians should help patients with or who are at risk for CCCA to minimize traction, tension, and trauma to the scalp caused by some hair care practices. In a recent study of more than 5,000 patients, CCCA seems to have an association with type 2 diabetes mellitus. “As we move forward, we need to start thinking about the whole patient,” Dr. McMichael advises. “It’s not just the scalp that we’re dealing with. It’s not just the hairstyle. But what is the health and underlying metabolism issue of some of these patients and can we as dermatologists be helpful in getting them to better health.” Dermatologists in residency need more training in hair care practices of patients with skin of color that encompasses the wide cultural differences in hairstyling methods and scalp conditions across different populations. Host: Lynn McKinley-Grant, MD (Howard University, Washington) Guest: Amy McMichael, MD (Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C.) Show notes by: Jason Orszt, Melissa Sears, Elizabeth Mechcatie For more MDedge Podcasts, go to mdedge.com/podcasts Email the show:podcasts@mdedge.com Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgeDerm

32 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Shampoo products for the skin of color population; statins and skin infections; and adalimumab’s survival benefit in psoriasis

Eye complications in patients with atopic dermatitis; indoor tanning’s SCC risk; and checkpoint inhibitor combo boosts melanoma survival

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with various ocular comorbidities that can result in permanent vision loss if left untreated. Dr. Soo Jung Kim talks with Dr. Vincent DeLeo about the incidence of keratoconjunctivitis, keratoconus, glaucoma, retinal detachment, and other ocular conditions associated with AD. Dr. Kim offers tips on spotting these complications and managing them but also indicates when referral to an ophthalmologist is necessary. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1. Nivolumab-ipilimumab nets long-term survival in advanced melanoma An update of CheckMate 067 finds that with combination nivolumab and ipilimumab therapy, 52% of patients were alive at 5 years. 2.Lifetime indoor tanning raises risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma Researchers found a dose-response association between number of indoor tanning sessions and SCC risk in Norwegian women. 3. FDA approves afamelanotide for treatment of rare condition with light-induced pain This is the first treatment approved to help patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria increase their exposure to light. * * * Things you will learn in this episode: Patients with AD may develop blepharitis, presenting with itching and irritation of the eyelids, as well as tearing, foreign body sensations, and even photophobia. The mainstay treatment of blepharitis is good eyelid hygiene with the use of warm compresses and gentle scrubbing of the lid margins. About 25%-52% of patients with AD have atopic keratoconjunctivitis. Clinicians should look out for red conjunctivae, hyperemia, and papillary hypertrophy of the conjunctivae. “Ultimately, if this is not treated in a timely manner, patients could have visual impairment,” explains Dr. Kim. Keratoconus is the progressive thinning and bulging of the cornea that can affect the cornea’s topography. “Patients experience imaging blurring as well as imaging distortions,” Dr. Kim describes. “We’re not exactly sure why atopic dermatitis patients develop more keratoconus, but it’s been believed that chronic, habitual eye rubbing is most likely to be the cause due to the periocular itching.” “Glaucoma is not necessarily a complication of atopic dermatitis; it’s more a complication of the steroid use,” explains Dr. Kim. Glaucoma in AD may be asymptomatic until advanced stages; therefore, clinicians should regularly screen patients who have a prolonged history of topical steroid application around the eye area, a family history of glaucoma, or a history of other ocular problems. Cataracts occur in 8%-25% of patients with AD, usually younger adults. Interior or posterior subcapsular cataracts are more common in these patients compared to nuclear and cortical cataracts, which are more common in the general population. Routine periodic screening by an ophthalmologist is required when patients have onset of periorbital atopic dermatitis, prolonged use of topical or systemic steroids, or a family history of cataracts. The incidence of retinal detachment is 4%-8% in patients with AD. “This is a lot higher than the general population, which is around 0.005%,” Dr. Kim says. “This retinal detachment occurs usually more bilaterally at a younger age, compared to cases without atopic dermatitis.” These patients should be quickly referred to an ophthalmologist for surgical repair. Patients with AD are at greater risk for herpetic ocular disease, and active ocular herpetic infections require urgent referral to an ophthalmologist. Dupilumab has been associated with ocular complications in patients with AD. Host:Vincent DeLeo, MD Guest: Soo Jung Kim, MD, PhD (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas) Show notes by: Jason Orszt, Melissa Sears, Elizabeth Mechcatie You can find more of our podcasts at http://www.mdedge.com/podcasts Email the show:podcasts@mdedge.com Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgeDerm

22 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Eye complications in patients with atopic dermatitis; indoor tanning’s SCC risk; and checkpoint inhibitor combo boosts melanoma survival

Why is atopic dermatitis disqualifying for military service? Plus, apple cider vinegar for AD, and opioid use in hidradenitis suppuritiva

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a highly challenging dermatologic condition for U.S. military members, especially for those deployed overseas with less-than-ideal access to care. Dr. Josephine Nguyen, president of the Association of Military Dermatologists, talks with Dr. Emily Wong about the military’s medical standards for evaluating individuals with AD who want to join the service. They also discuss how deployment can exacerbate symptoms of AD. “What is most important to understand regarding the military and any medical issue, including atopic dermatitis, is that we do not want a person’s medical condition to worsen because of their military service, or for them not to be able to receive the medical care they need,” advises Dr. Wong. “On the other hand, medical standards are in place to also ensure that the overall mission of the military can be done safely.” We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1. Apple cider vinegar soaks fall short in atopic dermatiti...

28 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Why is atopic dermatitis disqualifying for military service? Plus, apple cider vinegar for AD, and opioid use in hidradenitis suppuritiva

Dermatology residents experience burnout, too; plus why pediatric AD therapy has an adherence problem

Dermatology residents may be among the least burned-out residents across specialties, but burnout syndrome still affects almost one in three dermatology residents. In this special resident takeover of the podcast, three dermatology residents — Dr. Julie Croley (@dr.skinandsmiles), Dr. Elisabeth Tracey, and Dr. Daniel Mazori — discuss sources of stress for dermatology residents as well as tools to identify and combat burnout to ultimately be a better provider. “The low-stress perception of dermatologists may counterintuitively or paradoxically make recognizing burnout within others and ourselves challenging, so I think it’s important for residents and faculty to be aware that this occurs in such a high prevalence,” reports Dr. Croley. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1.Parent survey sheds some light on suboptimal compliance with eczema medications Nearly half of children with atopic dermatitis were not getting their medications as prescribed. 2.Meta-analysis finds platelet-rich plasma may improve hair growth Five studies reported statistically significant increases in hair density in favor of PRP over placebo. 3.Business case for interoperability remains elusive Bringing ownership of health data to the individual and setting a clearer definition of health IT standards are important drivers of interoperability. Things you will learn in this episode: Jeffrey Benabio quipped in a Dermatology News column, “The phrase ‘dermatologist burnout’ may seem as oxymoronic as jumbo shrimp, yet both are real.” Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment. For dermatology residents, the preliminary internship year plus the first year of residency can be the most stressful. “You have 2 years of being the least experienced person in your department,” explains Dr. Tracey, “and so that adds to the stress of the sense of lack of accomplishment during that time.” Board examinations are a top stressor for dermatology residents. Institutions are recognizing and addressing burnout among residents by offering wellness lectures, yoga classes, and social events to counteract the stresses of residency. Some also hold town hall meetings and forums that allow residents and other department members to raise concerns and find concrete solutions to shared problems. Formalizing feedback to residents, especially positive feedback, also is important. Residents — and all health care providers — need to take care of themselves to provide the best care to their patients. “It’s all about balance and about creating time for those other things that are important to you and not feeling guilty about setting aside time to do those things. We don’t always need to be productive and always be working,” Dr. Tracey adds. Setting both short- and long-term goals may be helpful in preventing burnout. Don’t lose sight of the ultimate goal — becoming a dermatologist — but set and focus on goals for the day or the week. First-year residents can help to create a positive culture within their departments. Instead of commiserating with colleagues only about a hard day, “sharing cool cases or talking about interesting things that you’ve learned” can create a better environment for everyone, Dr. Tracey advises. The idea that dermatology residents can’t or don’t experience burnout is a myth. “Just like a rare diagnosis, it’s sometimes harder to spot than something that we see all the time,” says Dr. Mazori. If a resident is starting to feel burned out, it is essential to reach out to a trusted friend or colleague to address the issues. Hosts: Elizabeth Mechcatie, Terry Rudd Guests: Julie Ann Amthor Croley, MD (University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston); Elisabeth (Libby) Tracey, MD (Cleveland Clinic Foundation); Daniel R. Mazori, MD (State University of New York, Brooklyn). Show notes by: Ann M. Hoppel, Melissa Sears, Elizabeth Mechcatie You can find more of our podcasts at htt

25 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Dermatology residents experience burnout, too; plus why pediatric AD therapy has an adherence problem

What’s eating you? Flea infestations; plus peanut allergy immunotherapy, and new data on sunscreens

The flea bite is a problem for a variety of populations — from those in natural disaster scenarios to pet owners. Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks with Dr. Dirk M. Elston about cat fleas and other issues in environmental dermatology. Dr. Elston discusses vector-borne diseases, including endemic typhus and cat-scratch disease, caused by organisms transmitted by fleas, as well as interventions to remove fleas and treat their bites. Dr. Elston also gets personal and talks about how he got interested in bugs following his time in the military. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1. States pass record number of laws to reel in drug prices Measures include authorizing imported prescription drugs, screening for excessive price increases by drug companies, and establishing oversight boards to set drug prices. 2. Peanut allergy pill gets thumbs-up from FDA advisory panel The approval of Palforzia is on condition that a black-box warning and medication guide are included in...

36 MINSEP 19
Comments
What’s eating you? Flea infestations; plus peanut allergy immunotherapy, and new data on sunscreens

Contact allergy to products with methylisothiazolinone; plus, topical options for hyperpigmentation, and thread lifts return

Household and personal care products are common sources of contact allergy in dermatology patients. Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks with Dr. Amber Atwater and Dr. Margo Reeder and about the epidemic of allergic contact dermatitis associated with methylisothiazolinone (MI), a common preservative found in many water-based products. Dr. Reeder and Dr. Atwater discuss the emergence of MI as a contact allergen and highlight some of the common and lesser-known sources of MI exposure. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1. Thread lifts making a comeback, but long-term effects remain unclear Patients with moderate skin sagging are better candidates than those with severe skin sagging. 2. New evidence supports immune system involvement in hidradenitis suppurativa Microscopy identifies signs of immune dysregulation in the blood of hidradenitis suppurativa patients. 3. Dr. Andrew Alexis discusses topical treatment options for pigmentary disorders Things you will learn in thi...

26 MINSEP 12
Comments
Contact allergy to products with methylisothiazolinone; plus, topical options for hyperpigmentation, and thread lifts return

Job satisfaction among dermatology hospitalists; plus understanding your millennial patients, and treating infections in atopic dermatitis

More patients are being admitted to the hospital with skin problems, and specialized dermatologists are needed to provide effective treatment. Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks with Dr. Michi M. Shinohara about the evolving role of the dermatology hospitalist in the inpatient setting. Dr. Shinohara highlights some key takeaways about job satisfaction and barriers to care from a recent survey of members of the Society for Dermatology Hospitalists. We also bring you the latest dermatology news and research: 1. Cephalosporins remain empiric therapy for skin infections in pediatric atopic dermatitis “When a patient with AD walks into your office and looks like they have an infection of their eczema, your go-to antibiotic is going to be one that targets MSSA [methicillin‐sensitiveStaphylococcus aureus].” 2.Should you market your aesthetic services to the ‘Me Me Me Generation’? By 2020, spending by millennials will account for $1.4 trillion in U.S. retail sales. Things you will learn in this e...

17 MINSEP 5
Comments
Job satisfaction among dermatology hospitalists; plus understanding your millennial patients, and treating infections in atopic dermatitis

Resident takeover on psychodermatology, plus a cure for vitiligo?

Psychiatric disease is seen in 30%-60% of dermatology patients. In this special resident takeover of the podcast, three dermatology residents – Dr. Elisabeth Tracey, Dr. Julie Croley, and Dr. Daniel Mazori – talk about the challenges of treating patients with both psychiatric and dermatologic disease. “In some instances, although ideally, we would like to refer [patients to a mental health professional], we do have to develop good skills during our training to be well equipped to handle these cases,” explains Dr. Croley. Beginning at 4:29, they discuss common psychiatric disorders seen by dermatologists, appropriate therapies, and strategies for building a strong rapport with these patients prior to referral. We also bring you the latest dermatology news and research. Recent progress in vitiligo treatment might be heading to vitiligo cure Clinical trials are now actively being planned to target interleukin-15, a cytokine thought to be essential for maintaining memory T cells. In...

23 MINAUG 29
Comments
Resident takeover on psychodermatology, plus a cure for vitiligo?

Get to know Julie Croley, MD, from Dermatology Weekly's Resident Takeovers

Julie Croley, MD, also known as @dr.skinandsmiles on Instagram, joins MDedge producer and host of the Postcall Podcast, Nick Andrews. You can find more interviews like this on the Postcall Podcast at https://www.mdedge.com/podcasts/postcall-podcast

21 MINAUG 28
Comments
Get to know Julie Croley, MD, from Dermatology Weekly's Resident Takeovers

Augmented intelligence: An interview with Dr. Justin Ko

Dr. Justin Ko speaks with MDedge reporter Ted Bosworth about the use of augmented intelligence in dermatology. Dr. Ko is the coauthor of the American Academy of Dermatology’s position statement on augmented intelligence, which was released in May 2019. Dr. Ko addressed this topic during the plenary session at the AAD’s summer meeting in New York City, in a presentation titled “Augmented intelligence: Fusing technology with human expertise to enhance dermatologic care.” “Augmented intelligence is a term that’s specifically used so that we can move people away from conceptions about artificial intelligence,” Dr. Ko explained in the interview. “When we use that term, the first thing that pops into people’s minds are robots, terminators … other things that seem intimidating … that misconception is one that I really want to draw attention towards.” This week, we also bring you the following news: 1: Hidradenitis suppurativa linked to higher NAFLD risk https://www.mdedge.com/d...

18 MINAUG 22
Comments
Augmented intelligence: An interview with Dr. Justin Ko

Latest Episodes

Shampoo products for the skin of color population; statins and skin infections; and adalimumab’s survival benefit in psoriasis

There is a consumer trend to avoid additives in hair care products and consider natural alternatives. Dr. Lynn McKinley-Grant, president of the Skin of Color Society, talks with Dr. Amy McMichael about shampoo ingredients and the importance of cleansing the scalp in the skin of color population. Dr. McMichael also discusses how hairstyling practices in this population can lead to hair loss and damage to the hair shaft. “We just have to be more healthy in our choices of how we do those styles and how we cleanse our scalp and our hair when we’re wearing those styles,” advises Dr. McMichael. We bring you the latest in dermatology news and research: 1. Psoriasis registry data provide evidence that adalimumab reduces mortality 2. Tape strips useful to identify biomarkers in skin of young children with atopic dermatitis 3. Short-term statin use linked to risk of skin and soft tissue infections * * * Things you will learn in this episode: Do patients need to avoid shampoos containing sulfates and parabens? “Sulfates are just one of the many ways that we can cleanse the scalp and the hair. It is a detergent, and when that detergent is removed, in order to cleanse the hair another detergent has to be put into its place,” explains Dr. McMichael There are "no data to suggest that these other detergents are better or safer or even helpful for our hair shaft.” Only patients with a true allergic contact sensitization to parabens need to avoid products with this ingredient. Patients need to understand that the “no-poo” method and dry shampoos are not cleansing the scalp. “There’s an idea that you can shampoo as infrequently as you want,” says Dr. McMichael. “That’s really not true. In order for your scalp to be healthy and to grow healthy hair, you need to have it cleansed. And once weekly is preferred but certainly every 2 weeks is reasonable.” Patients may rinse their hair with water and baking soda, apple cider vinegar, and tea tree oil without knowing how they interact with the bacterial and yeast components on the scalp. “And they can be bad for the hair shaft,” Dr. McMichael adds. Conditioners are not a good replacement for shampoo, especially for patients with a scalp condition. “Conditioners alone are not meant to cleanse,” Dr. McMichael explains. For women of African descent, consider dandruff shampoo products that are manufactured and tested for this patient population. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most prominent form of hair loss in the United States in women of African descent. Clinicians should help patients with or who are at risk for CCCA to minimize traction, tension, and trauma to the scalp caused by some hair care practices. In a recent study of more than 5,000 patients, CCCA seems to have an association with type 2 diabetes mellitus. “As we move forward, we need to start thinking about the whole patient,” Dr. McMichael advises. “It’s not just the scalp that we’re dealing with. It’s not just the hairstyle. But what is the health and underlying metabolism issue of some of these patients and can we as dermatologists be helpful in getting them to better health.” Dermatologists in residency need more training in hair care practices of patients with skin of color that encompasses the wide cultural differences in hairstyling methods and scalp conditions across different populations. Host: Lynn McKinley-Grant, MD (Howard University, Washington) Guest: Amy McMichael, MD (Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C.) Show notes by: Jason Orszt, Melissa Sears, Elizabeth Mechcatie For more MDedge Podcasts, go to mdedge.com/podcasts Email the show:podcasts@mdedge.com Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgeDerm

32 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Shampoo products for the skin of color population; statins and skin infections; and adalimumab’s survival benefit in psoriasis

Eye complications in patients with atopic dermatitis; indoor tanning’s SCC risk; and checkpoint inhibitor combo boosts melanoma survival

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with various ocular comorbidities that can result in permanent vision loss if left untreated. Dr. Soo Jung Kim talks with Dr. Vincent DeLeo about the incidence of keratoconjunctivitis, keratoconus, glaucoma, retinal detachment, and other ocular conditions associated with AD. Dr. Kim offers tips on spotting these complications and managing them but also indicates when referral to an ophthalmologist is necessary. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1. Nivolumab-ipilimumab nets long-term survival in advanced melanoma An update of CheckMate 067 finds that with combination nivolumab and ipilimumab therapy, 52% of patients were alive at 5 years. 2.Lifetime indoor tanning raises risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma Researchers found a dose-response association between number of indoor tanning sessions and SCC risk in Norwegian women. 3. FDA approves afamelanotide for treatment of rare condition with light-induced pain This is the first treatment approved to help patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria increase their exposure to light. * * * Things you will learn in this episode: Patients with AD may develop blepharitis, presenting with itching and irritation of the eyelids, as well as tearing, foreign body sensations, and even photophobia. The mainstay treatment of blepharitis is good eyelid hygiene with the use of warm compresses and gentle scrubbing of the lid margins. About 25%-52% of patients with AD have atopic keratoconjunctivitis. Clinicians should look out for red conjunctivae, hyperemia, and papillary hypertrophy of the conjunctivae. “Ultimately, if this is not treated in a timely manner, patients could have visual impairment,” explains Dr. Kim. Keratoconus is the progressive thinning and bulging of the cornea that can affect the cornea’s topography. “Patients experience imaging blurring as well as imaging distortions,” Dr. Kim describes. “We’re not exactly sure why atopic dermatitis patients develop more keratoconus, but it’s been believed that chronic, habitual eye rubbing is most likely to be the cause due to the periocular itching.” “Glaucoma is not necessarily a complication of atopic dermatitis; it’s more a complication of the steroid use,” explains Dr. Kim. Glaucoma in AD may be asymptomatic until advanced stages; therefore, clinicians should regularly screen patients who have a prolonged history of topical steroid application around the eye area, a family history of glaucoma, or a history of other ocular problems. Cataracts occur in 8%-25% of patients with AD, usually younger adults. Interior or posterior subcapsular cataracts are more common in these patients compared to nuclear and cortical cataracts, which are more common in the general population. Routine periodic screening by an ophthalmologist is required when patients have onset of periorbital atopic dermatitis, prolonged use of topical or systemic steroids, or a family history of cataracts. The incidence of retinal detachment is 4%-8% in patients with AD. “This is a lot higher than the general population, which is around 0.005%,” Dr. Kim says. “This retinal detachment occurs usually more bilaterally at a younger age, compared to cases without atopic dermatitis.” These patients should be quickly referred to an ophthalmologist for surgical repair. Patients with AD are at greater risk for herpetic ocular disease, and active ocular herpetic infections require urgent referral to an ophthalmologist. Dupilumab has been associated with ocular complications in patients with AD. Host:Vincent DeLeo, MD Guest: Soo Jung Kim, MD, PhD (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas) Show notes by: Jason Orszt, Melissa Sears, Elizabeth Mechcatie You can find more of our podcasts at http://www.mdedge.com/podcasts Email the show:podcasts@mdedge.com Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgeDerm

22 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Eye complications in patients with atopic dermatitis; indoor tanning’s SCC risk; and checkpoint inhibitor combo boosts melanoma survival

Why is atopic dermatitis disqualifying for military service? Plus, apple cider vinegar for AD, and opioid use in hidradenitis suppuritiva

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a highly challenging dermatologic condition for U.S. military members, especially for those deployed overseas with less-than-ideal access to care. Dr. Josephine Nguyen, president of the Association of Military Dermatologists, talks with Dr. Emily Wong about the military’s medical standards for evaluating individuals with AD who want to join the service. They also discuss how deployment can exacerbate symptoms of AD. “What is most important to understand regarding the military and any medical issue, including atopic dermatitis, is that we do not want a person’s medical condition to worsen because of their military service, or for them not to be able to receive the medical care they need,” advises Dr. Wong. “On the other hand, medical standards are in place to also ensure that the overall mission of the military can be done safely.” We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1. Apple cider vinegar soaks fall short in atopic dermatiti...

28 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Why is atopic dermatitis disqualifying for military service? Plus, apple cider vinegar for AD, and opioid use in hidradenitis suppuritiva

Dermatology residents experience burnout, too; plus why pediatric AD therapy has an adherence problem

Dermatology residents may be among the least burned-out residents across specialties, but burnout syndrome still affects almost one in three dermatology residents. In this special resident takeover of the podcast, three dermatology residents — Dr. Julie Croley (@dr.skinandsmiles), Dr. Elisabeth Tracey, and Dr. Daniel Mazori — discuss sources of stress for dermatology residents as well as tools to identify and combat burnout to ultimately be a better provider. “The low-stress perception of dermatologists may counterintuitively or paradoxically make recognizing burnout within others and ourselves challenging, so I think it’s important for residents and faculty to be aware that this occurs in such a high prevalence,” reports Dr. Croley. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1.Parent survey sheds some light on suboptimal compliance with eczema medications Nearly half of children with atopic dermatitis were not getting their medications as prescribed. 2.Meta-analysis finds platelet-rich plasma may improve hair growth Five studies reported statistically significant increases in hair density in favor of PRP over placebo. 3.Business case for interoperability remains elusive Bringing ownership of health data to the individual and setting a clearer definition of health IT standards are important drivers of interoperability. Things you will learn in this episode: Jeffrey Benabio quipped in a Dermatology News column, “The phrase ‘dermatologist burnout’ may seem as oxymoronic as jumbo shrimp, yet both are real.” Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced personal accomplishment. For dermatology residents, the preliminary internship year plus the first year of residency can be the most stressful. “You have 2 years of being the least experienced person in your department,” explains Dr. Tracey, “and so that adds to the stress of the sense of lack of accomplishment during that time.” Board examinations are a top stressor for dermatology residents. Institutions are recognizing and addressing burnout among residents by offering wellness lectures, yoga classes, and social events to counteract the stresses of residency. Some also hold town hall meetings and forums that allow residents and other department members to raise concerns and find concrete solutions to shared problems. Formalizing feedback to residents, especially positive feedback, also is important. Residents — and all health care providers — need to take care of themselves to provide the best care to their patients. “It’s all about balance and about creating time for those other things that are important to you and not feeling guilty about setting aside time to do those things. We don’t always need to be productive and always be working,” Dr. Tracey adds. Setting both short- and long-term goals may be helpful in preventing burnout. Don’t lose sight of the ultimate goal — becoming a dermatologist — but set and focus on goals for the day or the week. First-year residents can help to create a positive culture within their departments. Instead of commiserating with colleagues only about a hard day, “sharing cool cases or talking about interesting things that you’ve learned” can create a better environment for everyone, Dr. Tracey advises. The idea that dermatology residents can’t or don’t experience burnout is a myth. “Just like a rare diagnosis, it’s sometimes harder to spot than something that we see all the time,” says Dr. Mazori. If a resident is starting to feel burned out, it is essential to reach out to a trusted friend or colleague to address the issues. Hosts: Elizabeth Mechcatie, Terry Rudd Guests: Julie Ann Amthor Croley, MD (University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston); Elisabeth (Libby) Tracey, MD (Cleveland Clinic Foundation); Daniel R. Mazori, MD (State University of New York, Brooklyn). Show notes by: Ann M. Hoppel, Melissa Sears, Elizabeth Mechcatie You can find more of our podcasts at htt

25 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Dermatology residents experience burnout, too; plus why pediatric AD therapy has an adherence problem

What’s eating you? Flea infestations; plus peanut allergy immunotherapy, and new data on sunscreens

The flea bite is a problem for a variety of populations — from those in natural disaster scenarios to pet owners. Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks with Dr. Dirk M. Elston about cat fleas and other issues in environmental dermatology. Dr. Elston discusses vector-borne diseases, including endemic typhus and cat-scratch disease, caused by organisms transmitted by fleas, as well as interventions to remove fleas and treat their bites. Dr. Elston also gets personal and talks about how he got interested in bugs following his time in the military. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1. States pass record number of laws to reel in drug prices Measures include authorizing imported prescription drugs, screening for excessive price increases by drug companies, and establishing oversight boards to set drug prices. 2. Peanut allergy pill gets thumbs-up from FDA advisory panel The approval of Palforzia is on condition that a black-box warning and medication guide are included in...

36 MINSEP 19
Comments
What’s eating you? Flea infestations; plus peanut allergy immunotherapy, and new data on sunscreens

Contact allergy to products with methylisothiazolinone; plus, topical options for hyperpigmentation, and thread lifts return

Household and personal care products are common sources of contact allergy in dermatology patients. Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks with Dr. Amber Atwater and Dr. Margo Reeder and about the epidemic of allergic contact dermatitis associated with methylisothiazolinone (MI), a common preservative found in many water-based products. Dr. Reeder and Dr. Atwater discuss the emergence of MI as a contact allergen and highlight some of the common and lesser-known sources of MI exposure. We also bring you the latest in dermatology news and research. 1. Thread lifts making a comeback, but long-term effects remain unclear Patients with moderate skin sagging are better candidates than those with severe skin sagging. 2. New evidence supports immune system involvement in hidradenitis suppurativa Microscopy identifies signs of immune dysregulation in the blood of hidradenitis suppurativa patients. 3. Dr. Andrew Alexis discusses topical treatment options for pigmentary disorders Things you will learn in thi...

26 MINSEP 12
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Contact allergy to products with methylisothiazolinone; plus, topical options for hyperpigmentation, and thread lifts return

Job satisfaction among dermatology hospitalists; plus understanding your millennial patients, and treating infections in atopic dermatitis

More patients are being admitted to the hospital with skin problems, and specialized dermatologists are needed to provide effective treatment. Dr. Vincent DeLeo talks with Dr. Michi M. Shinohara about the evolving role of the dermatology hospitalist in the inpatient setting. Dr. Shinohara highlights some key takeaways about job satisfaction and barriers to care from a recent survey of members of the Society for Dermatology Hospitalists. We also bring you the latest dermatology news and research: 1. Cephalosporins remain empiric therapy for skin infections in pediatric atopic dermatitis “When a patient with AD walks into your office and looks like they have an infection of their eczema, your go-to antibiotic is going to be one that targets MSSA [methicillin‐sensitiveStaphylococcus aureus].” 2.Should you market your aesthetic services to the ‘Me Me Me Generation’? By 2020, spending by millennials will account for $1.4 trillion in U.S. retail sales. Things you will learn in this e...

17 MINSEP 5
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Job satisfaction among dermatology hospitalists; plus understanding your millennial patients, and treating infections in atopic dermatitis

Resident takeover on psychodermatology, plus a cure for vitiligo?

Psychiatric disease is seen in 30%-60% of dermatology patients. In this special resident takeover of the podcast, three dermatology residents – Dr. Elisabeth Tracey, Dr. Julie Croley, and Dr. Daniel Mazori – talk about the challenges of treating patients with both psychiatric and dermatologic disease. “In some instances, although ideally, we would like to refer [patients to a mental health professional], we do have to develop good skills during our training to be well equipped to handle these cases,” explains Dr. Croley. Beginning at 4:29, they discuss common psychiatric disorders seen by dermatologists, appropriate therapies, and strategies for building a strong rapport with these patients prior to referral. We also bring you the latest dermatology news and research. Recent progress in vitiligo treatment might be heading to vitiligo cure Clinical trials are now actively being planned to target interleukin-15, a cytokine thought to be essential for maintaining memory T cells. In...

23 MINAUG 29
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Resident takeover on psychodermatology, plus a cure for vitiligo?

Get to know Julie Croley, MD, from Dermatology Weekly's Resident Takeovers

Julie Croley, MD, also known as @dr.skinandsmiles on Instagram, joins MDedge producer and host of the Postcall Podcast, Nick Andrews. You can find more interviews like this on the Postcall Podcast at https://www.mdedge.com/podcasts/postcall-podcast

21 MINAUG 28
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Get to know Julie Croley, MD, from Dermatology Weekly's Resident Takeovers

Augmented intelligence: An interview with Dr. Justin Ko

Dr. Justin Ko speaks with MDedge reporter Ted Bosworth about the use of augmented intelligence in dermatology. Dr. Ko is the coauthor of the American Academy of Dermatology’s position statement on augmented intelligence, which was released in May 2019. Dr. Ko addressed this topic during the plenary session at the AAD’s summer meeting in New York City, in a presentation titled “Augmented intelligence: Fusing technology with human expertise to enhance dermatologic care.” “Augmented intelligence is a term that’s specifically used so that we can move people away from conceptions about artificial intelligence,” Dr. Ko explained in the interview. “When we use that term, the first thing that pops into people’s minds are robots, terminators … other things that seem intimidating … that misconception is one that I really want to draw attention towards.” This week, we also bring you the following news: 1: Hidradenitis suppurativa linked to higher NAFLD risk https://www.mdedge.com/d...

18 MINAUG 22
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Augmented intelligence: An interview with Dr. Justin Ko