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Geeks and Beats

Alan Cross and Michael Hainsworth

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Geeks and Beats
Geeks and Beats

Geeks and Beats

Alan Cross and Michael Hainsworth

6
Followers
0
Plays
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About Us

Music, Pop Culture and Technology from radio legend Alan Cross and TV's biggest geek Michael Hainsworth

Latest Episodes

Cause Songs are a Lost Cause

The inspiration for this week’s episode was the release of Robbie Robertson & friends’ cover of “The Weight” for “Playing for Change”. But as long time music industry exec Eric Alper tells us, the interest in rock icons rallying around a cause has been lost, and the 80s may get the blame. The video came out on September 18, 2019 featuring Ringo Starr, Robbie Robertson, Marcus King, and a bunch of other musicians from five continents. The release was to bring awareness to a project called “Playing for Change” – a music project to connect the world through music. Their website features an image an quote from Keith Richard quite prominently. So, this got us thinking… what other songs for causes have we seen through history? Here are some of the favourites from the Geeks & Beats newsroom: 1. “Wavin’ Flag” – Young Artists for HaitiRe Released in 2010, this song saw many Canadian artists like Tom Cochrane, Lights, Avril Lavigne, Drake, Justin Bieber, Sam Roberts, and many many more get together to raise funds for the hurricane devastation in Haiti. 2. “We Are the World” – USA for Africa Released in 1985, this song was written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie and was produced by none other than Quincy Jones to raise funds for famine relief in Africa. “We Are the World” was the first ever single to be certified multi-platinum, it received a Quadruple Platinum certification by the Recording Industry Association of America. 3. “What’s Going On?” – MTV All Stars The video opens with Bono, Gwen Stefani, and Aaron Lewis of Staind. Released in 2001, the song was brainchild of Bono and Jermaine Dupri to cover Marvin Gaye’s 1971 classic to raise funds and awareness for Artists Against AIDS Worldwide. 4. “We’re All In The Same Gang” – West Coast All Stars It came out in 1990, and was organized by rapper/producer, Dr. Dre to promote a message of anti-violence. The song featured many west coast rappers including Tone Loc, Ice-T, Dr. Dre and Eazy E, and MC Hammer. 5. “Tears in Heaven” – Tsunami Relief This song came out in 2004 to raise funds for tsunami relief. The song was produced by Sharon Osbourne and Simon Cowell and featured artists like Elton John, Scott Weiland, Ozzy Osbourne, Andrea Bocelli, Slash, Steven Tyler, and Mary J. Blige…. and many more surprises. Did we miss any good ones?

40 MIN5 days ago
Comments
Cause Songs are a Lost Cause

Rave and Drool, the 90s Documentary Gets a Podcast

Has there been a better time for Canadian rock bands than the 1990s? Tyler Elynuik doesn’t think so. Elynuik’s name might not ring a bell, but if you’re a fan of bands like Age of Electric, the Headstones, I Mother Earth, The Odds, The Watchmen and others who had their biggest hits and drew their biggest crowds in that era, you likely know his efforts to preserve and promote the music in a different way. He’s the mastermind behind Rave & Drool, the social media presence and in-progress documentary to tell the stories of musicians involved in the all-too-brief explosion of Canadian rock between hair metal and boy bands. From record store reminiscing to really big project “It all started years ago while I was working at a record store,” he says. “It was a slow night, so my coworker and I started reminiscing about all these ’90s Canadian bands (this was before people like Moist, Watchmen, AOE, IME had gotten back together) that led me to search the store’s database for recent ...

32 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Rave and Drool, the 90s Documentary Gets a Podcast

Little Green Men

Rumours of Alan Cross’s demise have been greatly exaggerated. He’s back from the (walking) dead and convinced little green men are watching us. We’ll review the UFO footage recently confirmed by the U.S. Navy and the connection to the band Blink 182. Plus, Abbey Road Studios opens its doors for 50% of The World’s Most Popular Podcast.

25 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Little Green Men

Alan Cross’s Last Show

By the time this podcast airs, Alan Cross could be dead. Also, this is the episode that happens when we tread water waiting for a guest who never shows.

34 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Alan Cross’s Last Show

Virtual Music Reality with Dark Slope Studios

Turning the graphic novel Scary Girl into a VR world was a tall task for Dark Slope Studios. Author and creative director Nathan Jurevicius and COO Dan Fill discuss the lessons learned in this new storytelling form, how music is integral to the success, and how “VR music” moves beyond crappy 360 degree concerts. Plus: you’re never gonna believe who Alan is ditching the CES 2020 after party for.

50 MINSEP 11
Comments
Virtual Music Reality with Dark Slope Studios

The iPhone from 1990: General Magic with filmmaker Matt Maude

General Magic invented the Emoji. Text messaging. Mobile communication. If it wasn’t for the biggest Silicon Valley failure nobody’s heard of, we wouldn’t have the iPhone we have today. It laid the groundwork for the modern mobile device only to have Apple pull the rug out from under it. Documentary filmmaker Matt Maude joins us from the London Bureau to talk about one of the biggest villains in computer history and the humanity behind the technology.

38 MINSEP 4
Comments
The iPhone from 1990: General Magic with filmmaker Matt Maude

Not Live from Black Lab Brewing

Thank you all who joined us live on location at Black Lab Brewing for the big fundraiser show! We managed to squeeze $1,200 out of you wonderful people, so we’re 12% on our way to CES 2020! Missed the live show? If only we had recorded it. We did manage to salvage the Q&A and that was awesome.

39 MINAUG 28
Comments
Not Live from Black Lab Brewing

Bubblegum Pop Turns 50

The first major manufactured band designed to cash-in on this new demographic called the “Teen-Ager” just turned 50. We talk to Andy Kim, the singer-songwriter behind the 1969 hit “Sugar Sugar” by “The Archies.”

35 MINAUG 21
Comments
Bubblegum Pop Turns 50

That Night at Massey Hall

One of Toronto’s most beloved theatres is currently undergoing a major renovation, but that doesn’t mean concert fans should stop telling stories about her.David Binks is on a mission to collect stories for a new book about Massey Hall, the great venue and icon, and he’s hoping you’ll be willing to help. “I love concert halls,” he said. “When I was a teenager, going to a show was just the highlight of everything… I have this love for a set of venues that really do something for me, that make the event memorable as well. And then I went to Massey Hall.” Massey Hall changed his life As someone who’s lived in Toronto on and off for nearly 20 years, Binks has his own favourite memories of the theatre. It’s a place he and his wife have gone so frequently, she’s bought tickets for them as he’s returned home from a trip to Europe, just because she knew he’d want to go out that night. Many times, they don’t even know who will be filling the stage that evening. One night, Bink...

39 MINAUG 14
Comments
That Night at Massey Hall

Political Cartoons with Pulitzer Winner Adam Zyglis

The editorial cartoon has power well outside its few words and images, but it is a power that is losing its place in the world at a time when it is needed most. In recent months, artists and readers of political satire, editorial cartoons and current affairs have been dealt three very real blows: The New York Times will stop publishing editorial cartoons in its international edition after an image perceived as anti-Semitic was published earlier this year; Michael de Adder, a widely respected and influential cartoonist in Canadian newspapers, was terminated the day after a cartoon was published showing Donald Trump asking drowned asylum seekers if he could continue playing golf around their dead bodies; and MAD Magazine announced it would stop publishing new material in its iconic issues. Any one of those announcements would be enough give people pause when considering the impact editorial and political cartoons can play. For all three to happen within weeks is astonishing. The world’s gone MAD MAD Magazine was created in 1952 and was the only publication of its time to survive a wave of pearl clutching self-censorship in the early days of the Cold War, when people were more worried about pulpy magazines and the images within causing irreparable damage to precious young minds than the actual horror in which they lived, being told daily that the Commies were going to bomb them out of existence. To survive, the magazine changed formats, becoming more magazine-style than its brethren, but it never wavered from biting satire and commentary that mocked just about everything and gave a generation or two of readers the inspiration to be funny, sarcastic and, most importantly critical thinkers. The New York Times does not run editorial cartoons in its domestic edition on a regular basis, but it had run editorial cartoons, either in the traditional single-image format or a short series of images, for a number of years. When it was noticed that a cartoon was published showing Trump blind and wearing a yarmulke, being led around by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the form of a guide dog, the newspaper took what some feel is an overzealous step and decided to cease any and all cartoons altogether. After the announcement was made, the paper said it would be open to running longer-form illustrations in the future, akin to the Pulitzer Prize-winning series depicting a Syrian family seeking asylum. That series, “Welcome to the New World,” was the first editorial cartoon to win the prestigious honour that was not direct commentary but, instead, a narrative story. Satire is not always humour de Adder had been a freelancer for Brunswick News Inc. for 17 years, with his work appearing in publications across Canada for nearly as long. He continues to be published nationally, but the New Brunswick job was particularly close to his heart as that’s the province in which he was raised. He believes that the cartoon, published on June 27, was “simply the final nail in the coffin and hastened my demise,” something that kind of backs up the company’s position that it was readying to offer de Adder a severance package and had already lined up someone else to replace him. The image that brought de Adder into the international spotlight certainly is a powerful one. But remember that cartoonists around the world have been jailed or killed for penning damning, evocative, critical and blatantly political pieces. Remember the four cartoonists at the French satire publication

34 MINJUL 31
Comments
Political Cartoons with Pulitzer Winner Adam Zyglis

Latest Episodes

Cause Songs are a Lost Cause

The inspiration for this week’s episode was the release of Robbie Robertson & friends’ cover of “The Weight” for “Playing for Change”. But as long time music industry exec Eric Alper tells us, the interest in rock icons rallying around a cause has been lost, and the 80s may get the blame. The video came out on September 18, 2019 featuring Ringo Starr, Robbie Robertson, Marcus King, and a bunch of other musicians from five continents. The release was to bring awareness to a project called “Playing for Change” – a music project to connect the world through music. Their website features an image an quote from Keith Richard quite prominently. So, this got us thinking… what other songs for causes have we seen through history? Here are some of the favourites from the Geeks & Beats newsroom: 1. “Wavin’ Flag” – Young Artists for HaitiRe Released in 2010, this song saw many Canadian artists like Tom Cochrane, Lights, Avril Lavigne, Drake, Justin Bieber, Sam Roberts, and many many more get together to raise funds for the hurricane devastation in Haiti. 2. “We Are the World” – USA for Africa Released in 1985, this song was written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie and was produced by none other than Quincy Jones to raise funds for famine relief in Africa. “We Are the World” was the first ever single to be certified multi-platinum, it received a Quadruple Platinum certification by the Recording Industry Association of America. 3. “What’s Going On?” – MTV All Stars The video opens with Bono, Gwen Stefani, and Aaron Lewis of Staind. Released in 2001, the song was brainchild of Bono and Jermaine Dupri to cover Marvin Gaye’s 1971 classic to raise funds and awareness for Artists Against AIDS Worldwide. 4. “We’re All In The Same Gang” – West Coast All Stars It came out in 1990, and was organized by rapper/producer, Dr. Dre to promote a message of anti-violence. The song featured many west coast rappers including Tone Loc, Ice-T, Dr. Dre and Eazy E, and MC Hammer. 5. “Tears in Heaven” – Tsunami Relief This song came out in 2004 to raise funds for tsunami relief. The song was produced by Sharon Osbourne and Simon Cowell and featured artists like Elton John, Scott Weiland, Ozzy Osbourne, Andrea Bocelli, Slash, Steven Tyler, and Mary J. Blige…. and many more surprises. Did we miss any good ones?

40 MIN5 days ago
Comments
Cause Songs are a Lost Cause

Rave and Drool, the 90s Documentary Gets a Podcast

Has there been a better time for Canadian rock bands than the 1990s? Tyler Elynuik doesn’t think so. Elynuik’s name might not ring a bell, but if you’re a fan of bands like Age of Electric, the Headstones, I Mother Earth, The Odds, The Watchmen and others who had their biggest hits and drew their biggest crowds in that era, you likely know his efforts to preserve and promote the music in a different way. He’s the mastermind behind Rave & Drool, the social media presence and in-progress documentary to tell the stories of musicians involved in the all-too-brief explosion of Canadian rock between hair metal and boy bands. From record store reminiscing to really big project “It all started years ago while I was working at a record store,” he says. “It was a slow night, so my coworker and I started reminiscing about all these ’90s Canadian bands (this was before people like Moist, Watchmen, AOE, IME had gotten back together) that led me to search the store’s database for recent ...

32 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Rave and Drool, the 90s Documentary Gets a Podcast

Little Green Men

Rumours of Alan Cross’s demise have been greatly exaggerated. He’s back from the (walking) dead and convinced little green men are watching us. We’ll review the UFO footage recently confirmed by the U.S. Navy and the connection to the band Blink 182. Plus, Abbey Road Studios opens its doors for 50% of The World’s Most Popular Podcast.

25 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Little Green Men

Alan Cross’s Last Show

By the time this podcast airs, Alan Cross could be dead. Also, this is the episode that happens when we tread water waiting for a guest who never shows.

34 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Alan Cross’s Last Show

Virtual Music Reality with Dark Slope Studios

Turning the graphic novel Scary Girl into a VR world was a tall task for Dark Slope Studios. Author and creative director Nathan Jurevicius and COO Dan Fill discuss the lessons learned in this new storytelling form, how music is integral to the success, and how “VR music” moves beyond crappy 360 degree concerts. Plus: you’re never gonna believe who Alan is ditching the CES 2020 after party for.

50 MINSEP 11
Comments
Virtual Music Reality with Dark Slope Studios

The iPhone from 1990: General Magic with filmmaker Matt Maude

General Magic invented the Emoji. Text messaging. Mobile communication. If it wasn’t for the biggest Silicon Valley failure nobody’s heard of, we wouldn’t have the iPhone we have today. It laid the groundwork for the modern mobile device only to have Apple pull the rug out from under it. Documentary filmmaker Matt Maude joins us from the London Bureau to talk about one of the biggest villains in computer history and the humanity behind the technology.

38 MINSEP 4
Comments
The iPhone from 1990: General Magic with filmmaker Matt Maude

Not Live from Black Lab Brewing

Thank you all who joined us live on location at Black Lab Brewing for the big fundraiser show! We managed to squeeze $1,200 out of you wonderful people, so we’re 12% on our way to CES 2020! Missed the live show? If only we had recorded it. We did manage to salvage the Q&A and that was awesome.

39 MINAUG 28
Comments
Not Live from Black Lab Brewing

Bubblegum Pop Turns 50

The first major manufactured band designed to cash-in on this new demographic called the “Teen-Ager” just turned 50. We talk to Andy Kim, the singer-songwriter behind the 1969 hit “Sugar Sugar” by “The Archies.”

35 MINAUG 21
Comments
Bubblegum Pop Turns 50

That Night at Massey Hall

One of Toronto’s most beloved theatres is currently undergoing a major renovation, but that doesn’t mean concert fans should stop telling stories about her.David Binks is on a mission to collect stories for a new book about Massey Hall, the great venue and icon, and he’s hoping you’ll be willing to help. “I love concert halls,” he said. “When I was a teenager, going to a show was just the highlight of everything… I have this love for a set of venues that really do something for me, that make the event memorable as well. And then I went to Massey Hall.” Massey Hall changed his life As someone who’s lived in Toronto on and off for nearly 20 years, Binks has his own favourite memories of the theatre. It’s a place he and his wife have gone so frequently, she’s bought tickets for them as he’s returned home from a trip to Europe, just because she knew he’d want to go out that night. Many times, they don’t even know who will be filling the stage that evening. One night, Bink...

39 MINAUG 14
Comments
That Night at Massey Hall

Political Cartoons with Pulitzer Winner Adam Zyglis

The editorial cartoon has power well outside its few words and images, but it is a power that is losing its place in the world at a time when it is needed most. In recent months, artists and readers of political satire, editorial cartoons and current affairs have been dealt three very real blows: The New York Times will stop publishing editorial cartoons in its international edition after an image perceived as anti-Semitic was published earlier this year; Michael de Adder, a widely respected and influential cartoonist in Canadian newspapers, was terminated the day after a cartoon was published showing Donald Trump asking drowned asylum seekers if he could continue playing golf around their dead bodies; and MAD Magazine announced it would stop publishing new material in its iconic issues. Any one of those announcements would be enough give people pause when considering the impact editorial and political cartoons can play. For all three to happen within weeks is astonishing. The world’s gone MAD MAD Magazine was created in 1952 and was the only publication of its time to survive a wave of pearl clutching self-censorship in the early days of the Cold War, when people were more worried about pulpy magazines and the images within causing irreparable damage to precious young minds than the actual horror in which they lived, being told daily that the Commies were going to bomb them out of existence. To survive, the magazine changed formats, becoming more magazine-style than its brethren, but it never wavered from biting satire and commentary that mocked just about everything and gave a generation or two of readers the inspiration to be funny, sarcastic and, most importantly critical thinkers. The New York Times does not run editorial cartoons in its domestic edition on a regular basis, but it had run editorial cartoons, either in the traditional single-image format or a short series of images, for a number of years. When it was noticed that a cartoon was published showing Trump blind and wearing a yarmulke, being led around by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the form of a guide dog, the newspaper took what some feel is an overzealous step and decided to cease any and all cartoons altogether. After the announcement was made, the paper said it would be open to running longer-form illustrations in the future, akin to the Pulitzer Prize-winning series depicting a Syrian family seeking asylum. That series, “Welcome to the New World,” was the first editorial cartoon to win the prestigious honour that was not direct commentary but, instead, a narrative story. Satire is not always humour de Adder had been a freelancer for Brunswick News Inc. for 17 years, with his work appearing in publications across Canada for nearly as long. He continues to be published nationally, but the New Brunswick job was particularly close to his heart as that’s the province in which he was raised. He believes that the cartoon, published on June 27, was “simply the final nail in the coffin and hastened my demise,” something that kind of backs up the company’s position that it was readying to offer de Adder a severance package and had already lined up someone else to replace him. The image that brought de Adder into the international spotlight certainly is a powerful one. But remember that cartoonists around the world have been jailed or killed for penning damning, evocative, critical and blatantly political pieces. Remember the four cartoonists at the French satire publication

34 MINJUL 31
Comments
Political Cartoons with Pulitzer Winner Adam Zyglis