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2Scientists

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2Scientists
2Scientists

2Scientists

Scientists Inc

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About Us

Curious about the cosmos? Intrigued by evolution? Two scientists put their heads together to help answer your questions. You can show your love for science by supporting us on patreon.com/2scientists

Latest Episodes

Stem by name stem by nature

She enjoys STEM advocacy, she works on stem cells, she is: Dr. Kristi Stemler. While she works at MD Anderson, she isn’t a cancer researcher. Rather she looks at the role of stem cells and diet in making cancer sufferer’s lives more comfortable. We talked to Kristi about being a first generation college graduate, an artist and thrower of sharp implements! This episode also features a guest appearance from cancer scientist, Stanford postdoc, and our SF taste of science coordinator: Saumyaa.

42 MINAPR 11
Comments
Stem by name stem by nature

23 and them

In the immortal words of Jeff Goldblum (well, his character anyway) “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.” This feels like a recurring theme in today’s world of technology that has the power to change our very DNA. Enter Dr. Katherine Drabiak, a doctor of jurisprudence and a bioethical scholar. What are our rights once we spit in a tube for 23 and me? How do we decide when science is being done for the greater good or just for profit? These are the kind of questions Katherine has considered in the course of her work.

51 MINAPR 4
Comments
23 and them

What a scientist looks like

Picture a scientist. Do you see the typical white lab coat, and a researcher trying to cure diseases? Who do you consider to be a scientist? Could it be a teacher? A girl scout leader? A comedienne? Our friend Ana Zambrana, says yes to all of the above. Whether talking to school children, or delivering monologues, Ana keeps those scientific principles in mind. Find out more about her outreach activities with Bardo Científico, or follow her antics on Twitter.

53 MINMAR 28
Comments
What a scientist looks like

Science out in the open

Anson Mackay studies the effects of climate change on freshwater ecosystems. His work often takes him way out to areas like Lake Baikal in Siberia, but openness in his work is not limited to geography. He understands his privilege as a white male professor at a prestigious university. He is an advocate for more open access to scientific information. He also supports efforts for gender equality, increased diversity and inclusion of ethnic minorities and the LGBTQ community. Don’t believe us? Check out his Twitter!

53 MINMAR 22
Comments
Science out in the open

Statistically Speaking

Ask the average scientist about statistics and watch them squirm. Not Dr. Karen Lamb though, she loves applying her training to real life problems. We met up with her in Melbourne to talk stats, scicomm and Superstars of STEM. You can follow Karen and her adventures on Twitter.

39 MINMAR 14
Comments
Statistically Speaking

Stars in indigenous eyes

How does seeing monsters in the stars help scientists understand where ancient wildlife could be found? Much in the same way that a cultural man and astrophysicist can become friends. Australian aborigines have been telling stories for tens of thousands of years, but only now are researchers starting to find the science within them. In this story we talked to Muruwari man Willy Stevens and his scientific partner in crime Dr. Duane Hamacher.

45 MINMAR 7
Comments
Stars in indigenous eyes

Dr Schaumberg (or how I learned to stop worrying and love the pill)

Mia Schaumberg always loved science, but she also loves exercise, so it would seem natural that she would end up as an exercise physiologist. Having received her doctorate she works as a lecturer at the University of the Sunshine Coast, whilst researching links between exercise and brain health in the ageing brain. During her PhD, though, she focused on how the contraceptive pill might affect athletic performance.

45 MINFEB 28
Comments
Dr Schaumberg (or how I learned to stop worrying and love the pill)

Addiction and attachment in monogamous mammals

Part III of our Stanford Special. Dr. Natalie Nevárez is first generation Mexican, the first in her family to go to college, but only the second to receive a scholarship from Pornhub (yes you read that right), and she’s proud of all of these things! She talked to us about her past and present research looking at how animals form attachments, and the importance of social networks in tackling problems like addiction. Natalie also talked to us about struggling through grad school, getting therapy and her love for community colleges. You can follow her fighting the good fight on twitter.

45 MINFEB 23
Comments
Addiction and attachment in monogamous mammals

When brain meets machine

Part II of our Stanford Special. No one wants someone poking around in their head and neither does your brain. This is a puzzle for scientists like Dr. Marc Ferro, who are interested in bioelectronics. He’s trying to develop brain implants to help in conditions like Parkinson’s disease, but how to do that when the brain wants to reject them?

45 MINFEB 22
Comments
When brain meets machine

The protein folding biologist: Marie Kondo of the cell

Part I of our Stanford Special. Dr. João Rodrigues decided early on that as much as he loved biology, he didn’t want to get his hands too dirty, so now he studies the shapes that proteins make by using computer models. He works with biologists and chemists to look at the way the proteins in our cells go from being like beaded necklaces to more complex structures to help them do what they need to do.

45 MINFEB 21
Comments
The protein folding biologist: Marie Kondo of the cell

Latest Episodes

Stem by name stem by nature

She enjoys STEM advocacy, she works on stem cells, she is: Dr. Kristi Stemler. While she works at MD Anderson, she isn’t a cancer researcher. Rather she looks at the role of stem cells and diet in making cancer sufferer’s lives more comfortable. We talked to Kristi about being a first generation college graduate, an artist and thrower of sharp implements! This episode also features a guest appearance from cancer scientist, Stanford postdoc, and our SF taste of science coordinator: Saumyaa.

42 MINAPR 11
Comments
Stem by name stem by nature

23 and them

In the immortal words of Jeff Goldblum (well, his character anyway) “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.” This feels like a recurring theme in today’s world of technology that has the power to change our very DNA. Enter Dr. Katherine Drabiak, a doctor of jurisprudence and a bioethical scholar. What are our rights once we spit in a tube for 23 and me? How do we decide when science is being done for the greater good or just for profit? These are the kind of questions Katherine has considered in the course of her work.

51 MINAPR 4
Comments
23 and them

What a scientist looks like

Picture a scientist. Do you see the typical white lab coat, and a researcher trying to cure diseases? Who do you consider to be a scientist? Could it be a teacher? A girl scout leader? A comedienne? Our friend Ana Zambrana, says yes to all of the above. Whether talking to school children, or delivering monologues, Ana keeps those scientific principles in mind. Find out more about her outreach activities with Bardo Científico, or follow her antics on Twitter.

53 MINMAR 28
Comments
What a scientist looks like

Science out in the open

Anson Mackay studies the effects of climate change on freshwater ecosystems. His work often takes him way out to areas like Lake Baikal in Siberia, but openness in his work is not limited to geography. He understands his privilege as a white male professor at a prestigious university. He is an advocate for more open access to scientific information. He also supports efforts for gender equality, increased diversity and inclusion of ethnic minorities and the LGBTQ community. Don’t believe us? Check out his Twitter!

53 MINMAR 22
Comments
Science out in the open

Statistically Speaking

Ask the average scientist about statistics and watch them squirm. Not Dr. Karen Lamb though, she loves applying her training to real life problems. We met up with her in Melbourne to talk stats, scicomm and Superstars of STEM. You can follow Karen and her adventures on Twitter.

39 MINMAR 14
Comments
Statistically Speaking

Stars in indigenous eyes

How does seeing monsters in the stars help scientists understand where ancient wildlife could be found? Much in the same way that a cultural man and astrophysicist can become friends. Australian aborigines have been telling stories for tens of thousands of years, but only now are researchers starting to find the science within them. In this story we talked to Muruwari man Willy Stevens and his scientific partner in crime Dr. Duane Hamacher.

45 MINMAR 7
Comments
Stars in indigenous eyes

Dr Schaumberg (or how I learned to stop worrying and love the pill)

Mia Schaumberg always loved science, but she also loves exercise, so it would seem natural that she would end up as an exercise physiologist. Having received her doctorate she works as a lecturer at the University of the Sunshine Coast, whilst researching links between exercise and brain health in the ageing brain. During her PhD, though, she focused on how the contraceptive pill might affect athletic performance.

45 MINFEB 28
Comments
Dr Schaumberg (or how I learned to stop worrying and love the pill)

Addiction and attachment in monogamous mammals

Part III of our Stanford Special. Dr. Natalie Nevárez is first generation Mexican, the first in her family to go to college, but only the second to receive a scholarship from Pornhub (yes you read that right), and she’s proud of all of these things! She talked to us about her past and present research looking at how animals form attachments, and the importance of social networks in tackling problems like addiction. Natalie also talked to us about struggling through grad school, getting therapy and her love for community colleges. You can follow her fighting the good fight on twitter.

45 MINFEB 23
Comments
Addiction and attachment in monogamous mammals

When brain meets machine

Part II of our Stanford Special. No one wants someone poking around in their head and neither does your brain. This is a puzzle for scientists like Dr. Marc Ferro, who are interested in bioelectronics. He’s trying to develop brain implants to help in conditions like Parkinson’s disease, but how to do that when the brain wants to reject them?

45 MINFEB 22
Comments
When brain meets machine

The protein folding biologist: Marie Kondo of the cell

Part I of our Stanford Special. Dr. João Rodrigues decided early on that as much as he loved biology, he didn’t want to get his hands too dirty, so now he studies the shapes that proteins make by using computer models. He works with biologists and chemists to look at the way the proteins in our cells go from being like beaded necklaces to more complex structures to help them do what they need to do.

45 MINFEB 21
Comments
The protein folding biologist: Marie Kondo of the cell
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