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8 O'Clock Buzz

Brian Standing, Haywood Simmons & Michelle Naff, J

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8 O'Clock Buzz
8 O'Clock Buzz

8 O'Clock Buzz

Brian Standing, Haywood Simmons & Michelle Naff, J

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Latest Episodes

King’s Bay Plowshares 7 headed to trial over civil disobedience

In 2015, a group of seven peace activists, some of them grandparents, broke into a U.S. nuclear submarine base and performed acts of civil disobedience to protest the government’s policy on nuclear war. Now known as the “King’s Bay Plowshares 7”, the group is headed toward trial, and their defence is being squelched by the government. Jan talked with six of the seven members of the group.

13 MIN4 d ago
Comments
King’s Bay Plowshares 7 headed to trial over civil disobedience

John Miller on “The Optimal Tax”

Several Democratic Presidential candidates are proposing increasing taxes on the wealthy. John Miller, professor of economics at Wheaton College and a member of the Dollars & Sense collective, recently wrote an article, “The Optimal Tax“, relating the 91% taxes in the Eisenhower era to proposals today — and what should be done with the revenue.

7 MIN4 d ago
Comments
John Miller on “The Optimal Tax”

Confused by Healthcare choices? ABC for Health can help!

The open enrollment period for signing up for healthcare starts soon, and so it’s time to hear from Brynne McBride, CEO of ABC for Health, a non-profit in Dane County which works to help people sort through the confusion surrounding the choices available.

16 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Confused by Healthcare choices? ABC for Health can help!

Rep Chris Taylor on the F-35 saga

Jan talks with 76th district Representative Chris Taylor for an update on discussions and public input for the stationing of F-35 fighter jets in Madison. She and a group of concerned Madison leaders will be visiting Burlington, VT to see how the F-35 squad stationed there is affecting that city.

10 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Rep Chris Taylor on the F-35 saga

Pseudoscience and Propaganda

In an era where political charges of “junk science” and “fake news” get thrown around to stifle opinions that differ from one’s own, getting science journalism right is a difficult, and often dangerous task. University of Wisconsin Journalist in Residence Christie Aschwanden recently tackled this minefield in her book “GOOD TO GO: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn From the Strange Science of Recovery.” Christie will speak on a Wisconsin Book Festival panel on Wednesday, October 16 that explores the intersection of scientific research and propaganda. Christie Aschwanden joined Monday Buzz host Brian Standing on 10/14/2019.

12 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Pseudoscience and Propaganda

Canteen Cuisine: Respite from the Prison-Chow Blues

For the 23,000 people incarcerated in Wisconsin’s prisons, getting a decent meal is not an easy task. Prison canteens offer a very limited selection, cooking utensils are few and far between, and most prisoners earn too little on the inside to afford much in the way of food from the for-profit canteens. Necessity, however, is the mother of invention, and inmates have found a variety of ways to cadge together a more varied menu than the standard prison fare. Wisconsin’s Books for Prisoners program has compiled 45 recipes donated by current residents of the Wisconsin Correctional System into a new book, “Canteen Cuisine. Cami Mathay edited and compiled the cookbook, and she joined the Monday 8 O’Clock Buzz on October 14, 2019.

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Canteen Cuisine: Respite from the Prison-Chow Blues

Rural Wisconsin Healthcare in Trouble

If you’re going to have a heart attack or a stroke, don’t do it in a small town. According to a national study, you have a six percent higher chance of dying in areas without a local hospital. And across the country, hospitals in rural areas are closing at an alarming rate — 155 since 2004. Wisconsin has weathered the rural health care crisis better than most, but even so, 15 of the state’s 76 rural hospitals are losing money, and may be at risk. The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism’s new series “Seeking a Cure: The Quest to Save Rural Hospitals” documents this problem. Parker Schorr of the Capital Times has been writing for the Center for Investigative Journalism on this topic. Parker Schorr joined Monday Buzz host Brian Standing on October 14, 2019.

13 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Rural Wisconsin Healthcare in Trouble

Laboring Bodies: The Plantation Legacy

In the 16th and 17th centuries, a new type of agriculture began appearing in the new world: the plantation. Focused exclusively on cash crops for an international market, but lacking industrial technology, plantations were dependent on cheap, human labor in order to turn a profit. A lot of labor, the cheaper the better. After finding that voluntary, paid laborers refused to do the brutal work required to keep the plantation running, and then finding that Native Americans were too susceptible to European diseases to be kept in close quarters, the plantation owners turned to African slaves. The legacy of the plantation system, and the slave trade it generated, is with us still. Historian Sasha Turner, of Quinnipiac University, is in Madison this week to participate in the Wisconsin Humanities Institute’s year-long “Interrogating the Plantationocene” seminar, with a couple of workshops on “Laboring Bodies.” Sasha Turner joined Monday Buzz host Brian Standing on October 7th, 2019.

11 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Laboring Bodies: The Plantation Legacy

Xandria Phillips Debuts New Poetry Collection, “Hull”

Xandria Phillips has published poems in the shade journal, American Poetry Review, Scalawag and the Virginia Poetry Review. Phillips’s debut poetry collection, “Hull,” explores emotional impacts of colonialism and racism on the Black queer body and the present-day emotional impacts of enslavement in urban, rural, and international settings. A University of Wisconsin First Wave Poetry Scholar, Phillips is also an accomplished visual artist. Xandria joined Monday Buzz host Brian Standing on October 7th, 2019.

12 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Xandria Phillips Debuts New Poetry Collection, “Hull”

Fermentation Fest Lets the Microbes Do the Work

For nine years now, the Wormfarm Institute has been presenting Fermentation Fest: A Live Culture Convergence. The 2019 edition of Fermentation Fest takes place on the first two Thursdays and Fridays in October in Reedsburg, Wisconsin. Expect a cornucopia of edible and quaffable products produced by the metabolism of microorganisms. Two 2019 Fermentation Fest presenters join us now by telephone. Kirsten Shockey co-founded FermentWorks in Applegate, Oregon to train people how to work with fermentation, and she is the author of Miso, Tempeh, Natto and other Tasty Ferments: A step-by-step guide to fermenting grains and beans for Umami and Health. Also joining us is Lou Bank, Executive Director of Saving Agave for Culture, Recreation, Education and Development, or SACRED, which works with rural communities distilling mezcal and tequila in Mexico.

11 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Fermentation Fest Lets the Microbes Do the Work
the END

Latest Episodes

King’s Bay Plowshares 7 headed to trial over civil disobedience

In 2015, a group of seven peace activists, some of them grandparents, broke into a U.S. nuclear submarine base and performed acts of civil disobedience to protest the government’s policy on nuclear war. Now known as the “King’s Bay Plowshares 7”, the group is headed toward trial, and their defence is being squelched by the government. Jan talked with six of the seven members of the group.

13 MIN4 d ago
Comments
King’s Bay Plowshares 7 headed to trial over civil disobedience

John Miller on “The Optimal Tax”

Several Democratic Presidential candidates are proposing increasing taxes on the wealthy. John Miller, professor of economics at Wheaton College and a member of the Dollars & Sense collective, recently wrote an article, “The Optimal Tax“, relating the 91% taxes in the Eisenhower era to proposals today — and what should be done with the revenue.

7 MIN4 d ago
Comments
John Miller on “The Optimal Tax”

Confused by Healthcare choices? ABC for Health can help!

The open enrollment period for signing up for healthcare starts soon, and so it’s time to hear from Brynne McBride, CEO of ABC for Health, a non-profit in Dane County which works to help people sort through the confusion surrounding the choices available.

16 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Confused by Healthcare choices? ABC for Health can help!

Rep Chris Taylor on the F-35 saga

Jan talks with 76th district Representative Chris Taylor for an update on discussions and public input for the stationing of F-35 fighter jets in Madison. She and a group of concerned Madison leaders will be visiting Burlington, VT to see how the F-35 squad stationed there is affecting that city.

10 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Rep Chris Taylor on the F-35 saga

Pseudoscience and Propaganda

In an era where political charges of “junk science” and “fake news” get thrown around to stifle opinions that differ from one’s own, getting science journalism right is a difficult, and often dangerous task. University of Wisconsin Journalist in Residence Christie Aschwanden recently tackled this minefield in her book “GOOD TO GO: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn From the Strange Science of Recovery.” Christie will speak on a Wisconsin Book Festival panel on Wednesday, October 16 that explores the intersection of scientific research and propaganda. Christie Aschwanden joined Monday Buzz host Brian Standing on 10/14/2019.

12 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Pseudoscience and Propaganda

Canteen Cuisine: Respite from the Prison-Chow Blues

For the 23,000 people incarcerated in Wisconsin’s prisons, getting a decent meal is not an easy task. Prison canteens offer a very limited selection, cooking utensils are few and far between, and most prisoners earn too little on the inside to afford much in the way of food from the for-profit canteens. Necessity, however, is the mother of invention, and inmates have found a variety of ways to cadge together a more varied menu than the standard prison fare. Wisconsin’s Books for Prisoners program has compiled 45 recipes donated by current residents of the Wisconsin Correctional System into a new book, “Canteen Cuisine. Cami Mathay edited and compiled the cookbook, and she joined the Monday 8 O’Clock Buzz on October 14, 2019.

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Canteen Cuisine: Respite from the Prison-Chow Blues

Rural Wisconsin Healthcare in Trouble

If you’re going to have a heart attack or a stroke, don’t do it in a small town. According to a national study, you have a six percent higher chance of dying in areas without a local hospital. And across the country, hospitals in rural areas are closing at an alarming rate — 155 since 2004. Wisconsin has weathered the rural health care crisis better than most, but even so, 15 of the state’s 76 rural hospitals are losing money, and may be at risk. The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism’s new series “Seeking a Cure: The Quest to Save Rural Hospitals” documents this problem. Parker Schorr of the Capital Times has been writing for the Center for Investigative Journalism on this topic. Parker Schorr joined Monday Buzz host Brian Standing on October 14, 2019.

13 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Rural Wisconsin Healthcare in Trouble

Laboring Bodies: The Plantation Legacy

In the 16th and 17th centuries, a new type of agriculture began appearing in the new world: the plantation. Focused exclusively on cash crops for an international market, but lacking industrial technology, plantations were dependent on cheap, human labor in order to turn a profit. A lot of labor, the cheaper the better. After finding that voluntary, paid laborers refused to do the brutal work required to keep the plantation running, and then finding that Native Americans were too susceptible to European diseases to be kept in close quarters, the plantation owners turned to African slaves. The legacy of the plantation system, and the slave trade it generated, is with us still. Historian Sasha Turner, of Quinnipiac University, is in Madison this week to participate in the Wisconsin Humanities Institute’s year-long “Interrogating the Plantationocene” seminar, with a couple of workshops on “Laboring Bodies.” Sasha Turner joined Monday Buzz host Brian Standing on October 7th, 2019.

11 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Laboring Bodies: The Plantation Legacy

Xandria Phillips Debuts New Poetry Collection, “Hull”

Xandria Phillips has published poems in the shade journal, American Poetry Review, Scalawag and the Virginia Poetry Review. Phillips’s debut poetry collection, “Hull,” explores emotional impacts of colonialism and racism on the Black queer body and the present-day emotional impacts of enslavement in urban, rural, and international settings. A University of Wisconsin First Wave Poetry Scholar, Phillips is also an accomplished visual artist. Xandria joined Monday Buzz host Brian Standing on October 7th, 2019.

12 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Xandria Phillips Debuts New Poetry Collection, “Hull”

Fermentation Fest Lets the Microbes Do the Work

For nine years now, the Wormfarm Institute has been presenting Fermentation Fest: A Live Culture Convergence. The 2019 edition of Fermentation Fest takes place on the first two Thursdays and Fridays in October in Reedsburg, Wisconsin. Expect a cornucopia of edible and quaffable products produced by the metabolism of microorganisms. Two 2019 Fermentation Fest presenters join us now by telephone. Kirsten Shockey co-founded FermentWorks in Applegate, Oregon to train people how to work with fermentation, and she is the author of Miso, Tempeh, Natto and other Tasty Ferments: A step-by-step guide to fermenting grains and beans for Umami and Health. Also joining us is Lou Bank, Executive Director of Saving Agave for Culture, Recreation, Education and Development, or SACRED, which works with rural communities distilling mezcal and tequila in Mexico.

11 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Fermentation Fest Lets the Microbes Do the Work
the END