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Declarations: The Human Rights Podcast

Declarations: The Human Rights

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Declarations: The Human Rights Podcast
Declarations: The Human Rights Podcast

Declarations: The Human Rights Podcast

Declarations: The Human Rights

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About Us

A show about human rights coming to you every week from the Cambridge Centre of Governance and Human Rights. Tune in each week as our panel explores the rights and wrongs of contemporary politics, joined by fascinating guests from the University of Cambridge and around the world.(All rights reserved, so to speak. Our theme song, "Relative Dimensions", was created by the artificial intelligence at JukeDeck.)

Latest Episodes

Bodies and Borders: Migration in the Digital Age

Technology is redefining the experiences of refugees and asylum seekers in this globalised world, whether it is artificial intelligence (AI) being used to screen their immigration applications or mobile applications designed to help them to access information and healthcare. The implications are far-reaching and complex, since such technological innovations could either strength or undermine human rights. Moreover, how human bodies are sorted reflects power dynamics and values in the 21st century. For instance, AI could expedite decision-making for immigration agents and reduce the backlog. Yet it is potentially dangerous to use AI in making decisions which could bear life-or-death consequences, by approving or denying a request for asylum. On this episode, we consider these questions about the current and future use of technology in the immigration space, plus how we should change the conversation so that people can become more informed in using and developing these tools. From the University of Cambridge and the Centre of Governance and Human Rights, this is Declarations and I am Jennifer Tridgell. We are joined by Petra Molnar, and Matt Mahmoudi. Petra Molnar is the Acting Director of the International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto, and specialises in immigration and human rights law. Matt Mahmoudi is Jo Cox PhD Scholar at the University of Cambridge, where his research focuses on technological marginalisation among refugees and vulnerable migrant populations.

35 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Bodies and Borders: Migration in the Digital Age

Weaponizing Walls: Trump, the Border, and Its Scars (with Dr. Ieva Jusionyte)

In this episode we discuss how the infrastructure of the US-Mexico border wall has become a weapon in and of itself. Since Trump’s campaign promise, “the wall” has captured onlookers’ horror and imagination. It is a frontline for so-called wars on drugs, terror, and migrants, but resistance to it is also a frontline in the fight for human rights. We explore the impact of the wall as weaponised infrastructure – not only a deadly symbol, but also a physical object that shapes the lives of those at or around the border. Our guest for the episode, Dr. Ieva Jusionyte, has worked as an emergency responder on both sides of the border in Arizona and Sonora. She is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Harvard, and Editor of the University of California Press Series in Public Anthropology. Her most recent book, Threshold: Emergency Responders on the US.-Mexico Border is written from the perspective of firefighters and paramedics working along the border. Music by Blue Dot Sessions, Borrtex, and Seed A.I.

49 MINSEP 12
Comments
Weaponizing Walls: Trump, the Border, and Its Scars (with Dr. Ieva Jusionyte)

Change in the Niger Delta: Oil Extraction, Greased Palms, and Petro-Capitalism

This week’s episode explores how the petroleum industry in the Niger Delta takes place at the intersection of contentious relations between multinational oil companies, the Nigerian nation-state, and local communities in the oil-producing regions. The guest on the show is Dr Elias Courson, a lecturer at Niger Delta University, Nigeria and a former postdoc fellow at the Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge.

41 MINMAY 6
Comments
Change in the Niger Delta: Oil Extraction, Greased Palms, and Petro-Capitalism

Special Episode: Launching 'Rhetoric Versus Reality in the War in Raqqa' (with Amnesty International)

In this episode, we speak with Donatella Rovera, Senior Crisis Advisor at Amnesty, Milena Marin, Senior advisor for Tactical Research, and Katya alkhateeb a senior researcher at the Essex Human Rights Centre, about launching the immersive investigation titled 'Rhetoric Versus Reality in the War in Raqqa' project. The project set out to document US-led Coalition civilian harms in Raqqa in 2017, through a collaboration between some 3,000 digital volunteers, and Amnesty's on-the-ground researchers.

40 MINAPR 26
Comments
Special Episode: Launching 'Rhetoric Versus Reality in the War in Raqqa' (with Amnesty International)

Race, Political Representation and Human Rights in the United Kingdom (with Simon Woolley)

In this episode we discuss the notion of a human rights-based approach to the socio-economic and cultural development of the UK, particularly in relation to race. The discussion explores the relationship between political representation and racial equality, alongside the development of political literacy amongst young people from minority backgrounds. Our guest for the panel discussion was Mr Simon Woolley, Director and one of the founders of Operation Black Vote & Chair of the Race Disparity Advisory Group at 10 Downing St. Soundtrack: 'Highway to the Stars' by Kai Engel, and 'Ascent' by Jon Luc Hefferman.

26 MINAPR 23
Comments
Race, Political Representation and Human Rights in the United Kingdom (with Simon Woolley)

What Can Maps, Twitter, and the Crowd do for Human Rights? (with Sam Dubberley)

In this episode we will be talking about the use of mapping and social media technologies to conduct human rights work, both outside the field and inside the field (what has come to be known as “Open Source Intelligence” or OSINT). This kind of work increasingly supports how human rights workers know with certainty when something has happened, and is becoming an important part of denouncing and reacting to human rights abuses. We were joined by Sam Dubberley, Senior Advisor to the Crisis Response Team at Amnesty International, and Manager of the Digital Verification Corps.

50 MINMAR 11
Comments
What Can Maps, Twitter, and the Crowd do for Human Rights? (with Sam Dubberley)

A Right to Sleep: Homelessness and Temporary Housing

The documentary “Cities of Sleep” explores the world of insurgent sleeper communities, as well as the infamous 'sleep mafia' in Delhi. Filmmaker Shaunak Sen and Cambridge PhD candidate Shreyashi Dasgupta join us to discuss the intersection between urban development, changing societies, city life and communities experiencing homelessness.

50 MINJAN 21
Comments
A Right to Sleep: Homelessness and Temporary Housing

Lost in Europe: Missing Migrant Children

Over 10,000 migrant children have been lost after arriving in Europe. Where do they end up? What are their stories? And who is responsible for their increasing vulnerability and their being forgotten? Our guests are Cecilia Ferrara and Ismael Einashe, investigative journalists from Lost in Europe: an investigative network committed to recovering the stories of these missing children.

45 MIN2018 DEC 11
Comments
Lost in Europe: Missing Migrant Children

Bolsonaro and #NotHim: Something Old or Something New?

Everyone's asking, "How did he win? What does this mean for Brazil's future?" But Jair Bolsonaro's victory in the October presidential election also raises more systemic questions. Our guest, Dr Malu Gatto from the University of Zurich, joins us to explore the legacy of Brazil's not-so-dated dictatorship for Bolsonaro and for resistance movements like #NotHim.

54 MIN2018 NOV 24
Comments
Bolsonaro and #NotHim: Something Old or Something New?

Season 3: Memory, Community, Futures

Welcome to Season 3 of Declarations. This episode introduces our brand new team of regular panelists, as well as this year's three themes: Memory, Community, and Futures.

11 MIN2018 NOV 19
Comments
Season 3: Memory, Community, Futures

Latest Episodes

Bodies and Borders: Migration in the Digital Age

Technology is redefining the experiences of refugees and asylum seekers in this globalised world, whether it is artificial intelligence (AI) being used to screen their immigration applications or mobile applications designed to help them to access information and healthcare. The implications are far-reaching and complex, since such technological innovations could either strength or undermine human rights. Moreover, how human bodies are sorted reflects power dynamics and values in the 21st century. For instance, AI could expedite decision-making for immigration agents and reduce the backlog. Yet it is potentially dangerous to use AI in making decisions which could bear life-or-death consequences, by approving or denying a request for asylum. On this episode, we consider these questions about the current and future use of technology in the immigration space, plus how we should change the conversation so that people can become more informed in using and developing these tools. From the University of Cambridge and the Centre of Governance and Human Rights, this is Declarations and I am Jennifer Tridgell. We are joined by Petra Molnar, and Matt Mahmoudi. Petra Molnar is the Acting Director of the International Human Rights Program, University of Toronto, and specialises in immigration and human rights law. Matt Mahmoudi is Jo Cox PhD Scholar at the University of Cambridge, where his research focuses on technological marginalisation among refugees and vulnerable migrant populations.

35 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Bodies and Borders: Migration in the Digital Age

Weaponizing Walls: Trump, the Border, and Its Scars (with Dr. Ieva Jusionyte)

In this episode we discuss how the infrastructure of the US-Mexico border wall has become a weapon in and of itself. Since Trump’s campaign promise, “the wall” has captured onlookers’ horror and imagination. It is a frontline for so-called wars on drugs, terror, and migrants, but resistance to it is also a frontline in the fight for human rights. We explore the impact of the wall as weaponised infrastructure – not only a deadly symbol, but also a physical object that shapes the lives of those at or around the border. Our guest for the episode, Dr. Ieva Jusionyte, has worked as an emergency responder on both sides of the border in Arizona and Sonora. She is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Harvard, and Editor of the University of California Press Series in Public Anthropology. Her most recent book, Threshold: Emergency Responders on the US.-Mexico Border is written from the perspective of firefighters and paramedics working along the border. Music by Blue Dot Sessions, Borrtex, and Seed A.I.

49 MINSEP 12
Comments
Weaponizing Walls: Trump, the Border, and Its Scars (with Dr. Ieva Jusionyte)

Change in the Niger Delta: Oil Extraction, Greased Palms, and Petro-Capitalism

This week’s episode explores how the petroleum industry in the Niger Delta takes place at the intersection of contentious relations between multinational oil companies, the Nigerian nation-state, and local communities in the oil-producing regions. The guest on the show is Dr Elias Courson, a lecturer at Niger Delta University, Nigeria and a former postdoc fellow at the Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge.

41 MINMAY 6
Comments
Change in the Niger Delta: Oil Extraction, Greased Palms, and Petro-Capitalism

Special Episode: Launching 'Rhetoric Versus Reality in the War in Raqqa' (with Amnesty International)

In this episode, we speak with Donatella Rovera, Senior Crisis Advisor at Amnesty, Milena Marin, Senior advisor for Tactical Research, and Katya alkhateeb a senior researcher at the Essex Human Rights Centre, about launching the immersive investigation titled 'Rhetoric Versus Reality in the War in Raqqa' project. The project set out to document US-led Coalition civilian harms in Raqqa in 2017, through a collaboration between some 3,000 digital volunteers, and Amnesty's on-the-ground researchers.

40 MINAPR 26
Comments
Special Episode: Launching 'Rhetoric Versus Reality in the War in Raqqa' (with Amnesty International)

Race, Political Representation and Human Rights in the United Kingdom (with Simon Woolley)

In this episode we discuss the notion of a human rights-based approach to the socio-economic and cultural development of the UK, particularly in relation to race. The discussion explores the relationship between political representation and racial equality, alongside the development of political literacy amongst young people from minority backgrounds. Our guest for the panel discussion was Mr Simon Woolley, Director and one of the founders of Operation Black Vote & Chair of the Race Disparity Advisory Group at 10 Downing St. Soundtrack: 'Highway to the Stars' by Kai Engel, and 'Ascent' by Jon Luc Hefferman.

26 MINAPR 23
Comments
Race, Political Representation and Human Rights in the United Kingdom (with Simon Woolley)

What Can Maps, Twitter, and the Crowd do for Human Rights? (with Sam Dubberley)

In this episode we will be talking about the use of mapping and social media technologies to conduct human rights work, both outside the field and inside the field (what has come to be known as “Open Source Intelligence” or OSINT). This kind of work increasingly supports how human rights workers know with certainty when something has happened, and is becoming an important part of denouncing and reacting to human rights abuses. We were joined by Sam Dubberley, Senior Advisor to the Crisis Response Team at Amnesty International, and Manager of the Digital Verification Corps.

50 MINMAR 11
Comments
What Can Maps, Twitter, and the Crowd do for Human Rights? (with Sam Dubberley)

A Right to Sleep: Homelessness and Temporary Housing

The documentary “Cities of Sleep” explores the world of insurgent sleeper communities, as well as the infamous 'sleep mafia' in Delhi. Filmmaker Shaunak Sen and Cambridge PhD candidate Shreyashi Dasgupta join us to discuss the intersection between urban development, changing societies, city life and communities experiencing homelessness.

50 MINJAN 21
Comments
A Right to Sleep: Homelessness and Temporary Housing

Lost in Europe: Missing Migrant Children

Over 10,000 migrant children have been lost after arriving in Europe. Where do they end up? What are their stories? And who is responsible for their increasing vulnerability and their being forgotten? Our guests are Cecilia Ferrara and Ismael Einashe, investigative journalists from Lost in Europe: an investigative network committed to recovering the stories of these missing children.

45 MIN2018 DEC 11
Comments
Lost in Europe: Missing Migrant Children

Bolsonaro and #NotHim: Something Old or Something New?

Everyone's asking, "How did he win? What does this mean for Brazil's future?" But Jair Bolsonaro's victory in the October presidential election also raises more systemic questions. Our guest, Dr Malu Gatto from the University of Zurich, joins us to explore the legacy of Brazil's not-so-dated dictatorship for Bolsonaro and for resistance movements like #NotHim.

54 MIN2018 NOV 24
Comments
Bolsonaro and #NotHim: Something Old or Something New?

Season 3: Memory, Community, Futures

Welcome to Season 3 of Declarations. This episode introduces our brand new team of regular panelists, as well as this year's three themes: Memory, Community, and Futures.

11 MIN2018 NOV 19
Comments
Season 3: Memory, Community, Futures