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FT News in Focus

Financial Times

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FT News in Focus
FT News in Focus

FT News in Focus

Financial Times

216
Followers
1.7K
Plays
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About Us

News features and analysis from Financial Times reporters around the world. FT News in Focus is produced by Fiona Symon.

Latest Episodes

What went wrong at WeWork?

The workplace philosophy of WeWork founder Adam Neumann was at the heart of his global real estate company. But WeWork is imploding after a recent IPO was shelved and Mr Neumann has been removed as CEO. Pilita Clark discusses how the company got into such difficulties and what this signifies for the property markets with Andrew Edgecliffe Johnson and Judith Evans. Contributors: Pilita Clark, business columnist, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, US business editor, and Judith Evans, property correspondent. Producers: Persis Love and Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

13 MIN1 days ago
Comments
What went wrong at WeWork?

Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

A Chicago start-up has found a way of turning microbes into edible protein, part of a growing trend towards a microbial revolution in food. Leslie Hook discusses why investors are increasingly interested in this area with Emiko Terazono, commodities correspondent, and Clive Cookson, science editor. Contributors: Leslie Hook, environment correspondent, Emiko Terazono, commodities correspondent, and Clive Cookson, science editor. Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

9 MIN5 days ago
Comments
Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

Shakespeare on Merseyside

Thanks to its links to Shakespeare and his players that were until recently a well kept secret, a deprived suburb of Liverpool is to house a new playhouse. Local investors have high hopes that it will woo some of the tourists that flock to Stratford-upon-Avon and Shakespeare’s Globe in London. Andy Bounds went to Prescot to speak to some of the project's supporters. Contributors: Andy Bounds, Enterprise editor and North of England correspondent. Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

11 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Shakespeare on Merseyside

European court sets precedent on hate speech

Europe’s top court has ruled that individual countries can force Facebook to take down illegal content, including hate speech, both inside the EU and across the world. Malcolm Moore discusses the implications of the ruling for freedom of expression with Mehreen Khan and Madhumita Murgia. Contributors: Malcolm Moore, technology news editor, Mehreen Khan, Brusselscorrespondent, and Madhumita Murgia, European Technology correspondent, Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

13 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
European court sets precedent on hate speech

The call that triggered a US impeachment inquiry

Many US Democrats had pushed for an impeachment inquiry against Donald Trump after the Mueller probe into Russian meddling in the last US election released its findings.But it took a July telephone conversation between Mr Trump and Ukraine’s new president to persuade Nancy Pelosi, speaker of the US house of Representatives, that it was time to act. Katie Martin discusses what happens next and what we know so far with Demetri Sevastopulo, Washington bureau chief. Contributors: Katie Martin, capital markets editor, and Demetri Sevastopulo, Washington bureau chief. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

16 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The call that triggered a US impeachment inquiry

John Ruskin's message for our times

John Ruskin was a towering figure in the Victorian era: an art critic, social reformer and all round thinker who had a huge influence on British society.After his death he fell out of favour. Yet much of what he wrote about the nature of work and the importance of protecting the environment is relevant today. James Pickford discusses his legacy with Sandra Kemp, an academic who oversees the Ruskin collection at Lancaster University and Andrew Hill, management editor. The Ruskin: Museum of the Near Future Contributors: James Pickford, deputy FT Money editor, Sandra Kemp, director of the Lancaster University’s Ruskin Library, and Andrew Hill, management editor. Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

12 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
John Ruskin's message for our times

Why would Iran attack Saudi Aramco's oil facilities?

A devastating missile and drone attack on Saudi oil installations last week highlighted the vulnerability of global oil supplies to the threat of regional unrest.The attack was claimed by Houthi rebels fighting Saudi-backed forces in neighbouring Yemen, but Saudi and US officials were quick to point the finger of blame at Iran. Geoff Dyer discusses the repercussions of the attack for the region and the oil market with Andrew England, Middle East editor, and Anjli Raval, senior energy correspondent. Contributors: Geoff Dyer, analysis editor, Andrew England, Middle East editor, and Anjli Raval, senior energy correspondent. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

14 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Why would Iran attack Saudi Aramco's oil facilities?

UK judges overrule PM on suspension of parliament

We have seen a historic day for British politics as the Supreme Court ruled that Boris Johnson’s decision to prorogue parliament for five weeks was unlawful. Siona Jenkins discusses what the ruling means for Brexit, for the prime minister, and for British democracy, with Jane Croft, law courts correspondent, and Neil Buckley, leader writer. Contributors: Siona Jenkins, news editor, Jane Croft, law courts correspondent and Neil Buckley, leader writer. Producer: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

8 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
UK judges overrule PM on suspension of parliament

As world leaders meet to discuss emissions, how is China doing?

As the world’s largest carbon emitter, China will be in the spotlight at this week’s UN climate summit in New York. Beijing has taken steps to tackle its pollution problems in recent years, but is it working? Pilita Clark puts this question to Leslie Hook, environment correspondent, and Lucy Hornby, deputy Beijing bureau chief. Contributors: Pilita Clark, business columnist, Leslie Hook, environment correspondent, and Lucy Hornby, deputy Beijing bureau chief. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

11 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
As world leaders meet to discuss emissions, how is China doing?

Memoirs of a whistleblower

In 2013, Edward Snowden was responsible for one of the biggest US intelligence leaks ever. He’s just published a memoir offering his version of the events. Janine Gibson was the Guardian’s US editor at the time and oversaw publication of the story. She shares her impressions of book and what it says about the man and his motives with Frederick Studemann, FT literary editor. Read Janine's story here Contributors: Janine Gibson, special projects editor, and Frederick Studemann, literary editor. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

16 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Memoirs of a whistleblower

Latest Episodes

What went wrong at WeWork?

The workplace philosophy of WeWork founder Adam Neumann was at the heart of his global real estate company. But WeWork is imploding after a recent IPO was shelved and Mr Neumann has been removed as CEO. Pilita Clark discusses how the company got into such difficulties and what this signifies for the property markets with Andrew Edgecliffe Johnson and Judith Evans. Contributors: Pilita Clark, business columnist, Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, US business editor, and Judith Evans, property correspondent. Producers: Persis Love and Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

13 MIN1 days ago
Comments
What went wrong at WeWork?

Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

A Chicago start-up has found a way of turning microbes into edible protein, part of a growing trend towards a microbial revolution in food. Leslie Hook discusses why investors are increasingly interested in this area with Emiko Terazono, commodities correspondent, and Clive Cookson, science editor. Contributors: Leslie Hook, environment correspondent, Emiko Terazono, commodities correspondent, and Clive Cookson, science editor. Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

9 MIN5 days ago
Comments
Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

Shakespeare on Merseyside

Thanks to its links to Shakespeare and his players that were until recently a well kept secret, a deprived suburb of Liverpool is to house a new playhouse. Local investors have high hopes that it will woo some of the tourists that flock to Stratford-upon-Avon and Shakespeare’s Globe in London. Andy Bounds went to Prescot to speak to some of the project's supporters. Contributors: Andy Bounds, Enterprise editor and North of England correspondent. Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

11 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Shakespeare on Merseyside

European court sets precedent on hate speech

Europe’s top court has ruled that individual countries can force Facebook to take down illegal content, including hate speech, both inside the EU and across the world. Malcolm Moore discusses the implications of the ruling for freedom of expression with Mehreen Khan and Madhumita Murgia. Contributors: Malcolm Moore, technology news editor, Mehreen Khan, Brusselscorrespondent, and Madhumita Murgia, European Technology correspondent, Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

13 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
European court sets precedent on hate speech

The call that triggered a US impeachment inquiry

Many US Democrats had pushed for an impeachment inquiry against Donald Trump after the Mueller probe into Russian meddling in the last US election released its findings.But it took a July telephone conversation between Mr Trump and Ukraine’s new president to persuade Nancy Pelosi, speaker of the US house of Representatives, that it was time to act. Katie Martin discusses what happens next and what we know so far with Demetri Sevastopulo, Washington bureau chief. Contributors: Katie Martin, capital markets editor, and Demetri Sevastopulo, Washington bureau chief. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

16 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The call that triggered a US impeachment inquiry

John Ruskin's message for our times

John Ruskin was a towering figure in the Victorian era: an art critic, social reformer and all round thinker who had a huge influence on British society.After his death he fell out of favour. Yet much of what he wrote about the nature of work and the importance of protecting the environment is relevant today. James Pickford discusses his legacy with Sandra Kemp, an academic who oversees the Ruskin collection at Lancaster University and Andrew Hill, management editor. The Ruskin: Museum of the Near Future Contributors: James Pickford, deputy FT Money editor, Sandra Kemp, director of the Lancaster University’s Ruskin Library, and Andrew Hill, management editor. Producers: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

12 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
John Ruskin's message for our times

Why would Iran attack Saudi Aramco's oil facilities?

A devastating missile and drone attack on Saudi oil installations last week highlighted the vulnerability of global oil supplies to the threat of regional unrest.The attack was claimed by Houthi rebels fighting Saudi-backed forces in neighbouring Yemen, but Saudi and US officials were quick to point the finger of blame at Iran. Geoff Dyer discusses the repercussions of the attack for the region and the oil market with Andrew England, Middle East editor, and Anjli Raval, senior energy correspondent. Contributors: Geoff Dyer, analysis editor, Andrew England, Middle East editor, and Anjli Raval, senior energy correspondent. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

14 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Why would Iran attack Saudi Aramco's oil facilities?

UK judges overrule PM on suspension of parliament

We have seen a historic day for British politics as the Supreme Court ruled that Boris Johnson’s decision to prorogue parliament for five weeks was unlawful. Siona Jenkins discusses what the ruling means for Brexit, for the prime minister, and for British democracy, with Jane Croft, law courts correspondent, and Neil Buckley, leader writer. Contributors: Siona Jenkins, news editor, Jane Croft, law courts correspondent and Neil Buckley, leader writer. Producer: Fiona Symon and Persis Love For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

8 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
UK judges overrule PM on suspension of parliament

As world leaders meet to discuss emissions, how is China doing?

As the world’s largest carbon emitter, China will be in the spotlight at this week’s UN climate summit in New York. Beijing has taken steps to tackle its pollution problems in recent years, but is it working? Pilita Clark puts this question to Leslie Hook, environment correspondent, and Lucy Hornby, deputy Beijing bureau chief. Contributors: Pilita Clark, business columnist, Leslie Hook, environment correspondent, and Lucy Hornby, deputy Beijing bureau chief. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

11 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
As world leaders meet to discuss emissions, how is China doing?

Memoirs of a whistleblower

In 2013, Edward Snowden was responsible for one of the biggest US intelligence leaks ever. He’s just published a memoir offering his version of the events. Janine Gibson was the Guardian’s US editor at the time and oversaw publication of the story. She shares her impressions of book and what it says about the man and his motives with Frederick Studemann, FT literary editor. Read Janine's story here Contributors: Janine Gibson, special projects editor, and Frederick Studemann, literary editor. Producer: Fiona Symon For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

16 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Memoirs of a whistleblower