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Flyover

Minnesota Public Radio

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Flyover

Flyover

Minnesota Public Radio

6
Followers
0
Plays
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About Us

Flyover from MPR News focuses on issues of American identity and the changing American dream as they are lived and experienced in the cities, towns and rural areas that lie beyond the media spotlight. This podcast is an unedited hour of live radio with award-winning host Kerri Miller. Season Three, starting January 2020, focuses on the counties that flipped party loyalties from one presidential election to the next. Season Two, which aired the summer of 2018, focused on the Mississippi River. Season One, which aired in the fall of 2017, examined issues that sometimes divide us as a nation.

Latest Episodes

They Believed: Maya Angelou’s ‘On the Pulse of Morning’

When Maya Angelou stepped to the podium on a cold January day in 1993, she became the first African-American and the first woman to offer an inaugural poem. And what a poem it was. “On the Pulse of Morning” garnered immediate praise for its sweeping portrait of American history and wisdom. Elizabeth Alexander remembers that moment – and contrasts it with her own time on the same stage – on MPR News with Kerri Miller, in the first installment of an occasional series, “They Believed.” At this pivotal moment in U.S. history, we want to look back at the words of America’s firebrands, visionaries and truth-tellers. What do they reveal about who we were then – and who we are now? Guest: Elizabeth Alexander is a poet and scholar. She currently leads The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

48 MIN3 d ago
Comments
They Believed: Maya Angelou’s ‘On the Pulse of Morning’

Identity Politics

The Upper Midwest is one of the most unpredictable places in politics right now. Voters in more than 50 counties in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois and Michigan flipped from President Obama in 2012 to President Trump in 2016. And so-called identity politics played a role in that, for better or worse. Today on Flyover 2020, we talk about how both political parties try to activate specific segments of voters – and whether that practice is leaving us even more fractured. We also talk with a conservative pastor from a small town in Iowa who defies some of those labels. Guests: Khalilah Brown-Dean, political science professor at Quinnipiac University and the author of the new book “Identity Politics in the United States” Rev. John Lee, Bethel Christian Reformed Church, Sioux Center, Iowa

26 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Identity Politics

Flyover 2020: Rural America’s brain gain

It’s a surprise to many: Rural America is more politically diverse, more educated and more economically optimistic than stereotypes lead us to believe. Maybe most encouraging to the Upper Midwest: Many small towns are reversing the so-called brain drain and showing a brain gain. Young people who left their hometowns to go to college are increasingly likely to move back in their 30s and 40s, bringing with them college degrees, new businesses and families. On this episode, we look at the changing demographics and misunderstood labels of rural America. It’s the next installment in our Flyover 2020 series, which examines the issues that matter to the Upper Midwest and the 50 or so flipped counties in our region. Guest: Ben Winchester, University of Minnesota researcher documenting the rural brain gain

42 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Flyover 2020: Rural America’s brain gain

Flyover 2020: Polarization anxiety

When it comes to flipped counties, the Upper Midwest is ground zero. More than 50 counties in Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan and Illinois that voted for Barack Obama in 2012 voted for Donald Trump in 2016. And many of them flipped big — in some cases, by more than 30 points. So this year, we are reviving Flyover to examine how our life experiences, beliefs about issues and compatibility with candidates shape the perception of Upper Midwestern voters as we move toward the 2020 election. Our first topic: polarization anxiety. It’s a term created by anthropologist Jose Santos to describe what he sees in the classroom: students unable to discuss topics because of the polarized climate we live in. That inhibits conversation and learning. Guest: Jose Santos, anthropologist and professor at Metro State University To listen to the full conversation you can use the audio player above. Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts , Spotify or RSS. Show page Flyover Season 2, Episode 6 Voices from the Bayou

49 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Flyover 2020: Polarization anxiety

Voices from the Bayou

We close our week-long series of conversations about the Mississippi River with a townhall event from deep in Louisiana's Mississippi River delta. Our "Voices from the Bayou" special wraps up our journey with a community conversation on solutions to the problems faced by people in the river's watershed. From the Larose Civic Center in Louisiana, Kerri Miller speaks to a gathering of engineers, educators, shrimpers, tribal leaders and others about their ideas, programs and progress for improving quality life along the last miles of the Mississippi. Our guests were Donald Bogen, co-director of Bayou Interfaith Shared Community Organizing; Chief Shirell Parfait-Dardar of the Grand Caillou/Dula Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw; Denise J. Reed of the Coastal Management and Restoration Science at the University of New Orleans; and Lance Nacio, a shrimper and coastal advocate.

50 MIN2018 JUL 20
Comments
Voices from the Bayou

How the river divides us

This episode brings us to New Orleans to explore the way the river divides people and the way a changing climate exacerbates that problem. Our guests are Happy Johnson, chief resilience officer, Lower 9th Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement & Development and co-founder of the Team Happy Foundation; Heather Stone, oral historian and assistant professor at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette; and Tegan Wendland, interim news director and reporter for WWNO in New Orleans.

50 MIN2018 JUL 19
Comments
How the river divides us

Balancing agriculture and water health

What happens here in the fields and farms of Iowa and the rest of the Midwest has an effect on the Mississippi River and its watershed all way down to the Gulf of Mexico. But the country needs the crops that Iowa produces. How do we find the right balance?

49 MIN2018 JUL 18
Comments
Balancing agriculture and water health

Who controls the Mississippi River?

In many towns and cities along the river, there are clashes over levees, diversion plans. dredging drainage and development. Are we listening to more than just the interests with the loudest voices and most money? Are government decision-makers hearing from enough individuals? Kerri Miller digs into these questions with two guests: Roger Wolf, director of environment program and services at the Iowa Soybean Association, and Carrie Jennings, research and policy director at the Freshwater Society.

49 MIN2018 JUL 17
Comments
Who controls the Mississippi River?

How the Mississippi has shaped communities, culture and commerce

The Mississippi River snakes over 2,000 miles from the United States' northern border to its southern coast. But the waterway's imprint is felt far beyond its shores. As we kick off Flyover: Down the Mississippi River, we discuss the historical and cultural impact of the river — from the towns that were founded on its banks to the businesses that it bolstered and the music that it inspired. Boyce Upholt, a writer and editor, and Winona LaDuke, the director of Honor the Earth, describe how the river has been an inextricable part of America's past and a vital part of our future.

49 MIN2018 JUL 16
Comments
How the Mississippi has shaped communities, culture and commerce

How Mississippi River mayors handle a 'perfect storm' of challenges

MPR News host Kerri Miller moderated a discussion with a group of mayors who are all faced with the urgency of delivering clean water to their communities in the face of tight city budgets and aging infrastructure and a climate that's changing. The talk was part of the One Water Summit in Minneapolis.

51 MIN2018 JUL 12
Comments
How Mississippi River mayors handle a 'perfect storm' of challenges

Latest Episodes

They Believed: Maya Angelou’s ‘On the Pulse of Morning’

When Maya Angelou stepped to the podium on a cold January day in 1993, she became the first African-American and the first woman to offer an inaugural poem. And what a poem it was. “On the Pulse of Morning” garnered immediate praise for its sweeping portrait of American history and wisdom. Elizabeth Alexander remembers that moment – and contrasts it with her own time on the same stage – on MPR News with Kerri Miller, in the first installment of an occasional series, “They Believed.” At this pivotal moment in U.S. history, we want to look back at the words of America’s firebrands, visionaries and truth-tellers. What do they reveal about who we were then – and who we are now? Guest: Elizabeth Alexander is a poet and scholar. She currently leads The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

48 MIN3 d ago
Comments
They Believed: Maya Angelou’s ‘On the Pulse of Morning’

Identity Politics

The Upper Midwest is one of the most unpredictable places in politics right now. Voters in more than 50 counties in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois and Michigan flipped from President Obama in 2012 to President Trump in 2016. And so-called identity politics played a role in that, for better or worse. Today on Flyover 2020, we talk about how both political parties try to activate specific segments of voters – and whether that practice is leaving us even more fractured. We also talk with a conservative pastor from a small town in Iowa who defies some of those labels. Guests: Khalilah Brown-Dean, political science professor at Quinnipiac University and the author of the new book “Identity Politics in the United States” Rev. John Lee, Bethel Christian Reformed Church, Sioux Center, Iowa

26 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Identity Politics

Flyover 2020: Rural America’s brain gain

It’s a surprise to many: Rural America is more politically diverse, more educated and more economically optimistic than stereotypes lead us to believe. Maybe most encouraging to the Upper Midwest: Many small towns are reversing the so-called brain drain and showing a brain gain. Young people who left their hometowns to go to college are increasingly likely to move back in their 30s and 40s, bringing with them college degrees, new businesses and families. On this episode, we look at the changing demographics and misunderstood labels of rural America. It’s the next installment in our Flyover 2020 series, which examines the issues that matter to the Upper Midwest and the 50 or so flipped counties in our region. Guest: Ben Winchester, University of Minnesota researcher documenting the rural brain gain

42 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Flyover 2020: Rural America’s brain gain

Flyover 2020: Polarization anxiety

When it comes to flipped counties, the Upper Midwest is ground zero. More than 50 counties in Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan and Illinois that voted for Barack Obama in 2012 voted for Donald Trump in 2016. And many of them flipped big — in some cases, by more than 30 points. So this year, we are reviving Flyover to examine how our life experiences, beliefs about issues and compatibility with candidates shape the perception of Upper Midwestern voters as we move toward the 2020 election. Our first topic: polarization anxiety. It’s a term created by anthropologist Jose Santos to describe what he sees in the classroom: students unable to discuss topics because of the polarized climate we live in. That inhibits conversation and learning. Guest: Jose Santos, anthropologist and professor at Metro State University To listen to the full conversation you can use the audio player above. Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts , Spotify or RSS. Show page Flyover Season 2, Episode 6 Voices from the Bayou

49 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Flyover 2020: Polarization anxiety

Voices from the Bayou

We close our week-long series of conversations about the Mississippi River with a townhall event from deep in Louisiana's Mississippi River delta. Our "Voices from the Bayou" special wraps up our journey with a community conversation on solutions to the problems faced by people in the river's watershed. From the Larose Civic Center in Louisiana, Kerri Miller speaks to a gathering of engineers, educators, shrimpers, tribal leaders and others about their ideas, programs and progress for improving quality life along the last miles of the Mississippi. Our guests were Donald Bogen, co-director of Bayou Interfaith Shared Community Organizing; Chief Shirell Parfait-Dardar of the Grand Caillou/Dula Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw; Denise J. Reed of the Coastal Management and Restoration Science at the University of New Orleans; and Lance Nacio, a shrimper and coastal advocate.

50 MIN2018 JUL 20
Comments
Voices from the Bayou

How the river divides us

This episode brings us to New Orleans to explore the way the river divides people and the way a changing climate exacerbates that problem. Our guests are Happy Johnson, chief resilience officer, Lower 9th Ward Center for Sustainable Engagement & Development and co-founder of the Team Happy Foundation; Heather Stone, oral historian and assistant professor at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette; and Tegan Wendland, interim news director and reporter for WWNO in New Orleans.

50 MIN2018 JUL 19
Comments
How the river divides us

Balancing agriculture and water health

What happens here in the fields and farms of Iowa and the rest of the Midwest has an effect on the Mississippi River and its watershed all way down to the Gulf of Mexico. But the country needs the crops that Iowa produces. How do we find the right balance?

49 MIN2018 JUL 18
Comments
Balancing agriculture and water health

Who controls the Mississippi River?

In many towns and cities along the river, there are clashes over levees, diversion plans. dredging drainage and development. Are we listening to more than just the interests with the loudest voices and most money? Are government decision-makers hearing from enough individuals? Kerri Miller digs into these questions with two guests: Roger Wolf, director of environment program and services at the Iowa Soybean Association, and Carrie Jennings, research and policy director at the Freshwater Society.

49 MIN2018 JUL 17
Comments
Who controls the Mississippi River?

How the Mississippi has shaped communities, culture and commerce

The Mississippi River snakes over 2,000 miles from the United States' northern border to its southern coast. But the waterway's imprint is felt far beyond its shores. As we kick off Flyover: Down the Mississippi River, we discuss the historical and cultural impact of the river — from the towns that were founded on its banks to the businesses that it bolstered and the music that it inspired. Boyce Upholt, a writer and editor, and Winona LaDuke, the director of Honor the Earth, describe how the river has been an inextricable part of America's past and a vital part of our future.

49 MIN2018 JUL 16
Comments
How the Mississippi has shaped communities, culture and commerce

How Mississippi River mayors handle a 'perfect storm' of challenges

MPR News host Kerri Miller moderated a discussion with a group of mayors who are all faced with the urgency of delivering clean water to their communities in the face of tight city budgets and aging infrastructure and a climate that's changing. The talk was part of the One Water Summit in Minneapolis.

51 MIN2018 JUL 12
Comments
How Mississippi River mayors handle a 'perfect storm' of challenges
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