title

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Mark Leon Goldberg

31
Followers
157
Plays
Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Mark Leon Goldberg

31
Followers
157
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Journalists, policymakers, diplomats and scholars discuss under-reported news, trends and topics from around the world. Named by The Guardian as “One of 27 Podcasts to Make You Smarter” Global Dispatches is podcast about foreign policy and world affairs.

Latest Episodes

Inside Europe's Largest Refugee Camp

The Moria Refugee Camp on the island of Lesvos, Greece is the largest refugee camp in Europe. The camp has an official capacity of just over 2,000 people. But the population is now more than 17,000, with most people living in makeshift shelters in fields and olive groves on the island. In recent months the number of refugees arriving at Lesvos by boat from Turkey has sharply increased. This is following the breakdown of a 2016 agreement between Turkey and the European Union in which Turkey largely stopped boat departures from its shores. Now, thousands of refugees are once again arriving on the Greek Islands. Over 3,000 people have arrived in November alone. Needless to say, the conditions on the island of Lesvos are horrendous. People are stuck there, seemingly in perpetual limbo as they asylum claims are processed and they await transfer to the mainland. On the line with me to discuss the situation on Lesvos is Dr. Siyana Shaffi. She is the founder of the NGO Kitrinos which provides healthcare to refugees in Greece. She recently returned from Camp Moria when we spoke in November and in this conversation she gives you a real sense of the harsh conditions faced by refugees stranded on an island in Europe. Since we spoke, the government of Greece announced somewhat nebulous plans to close the camp and transfer its residents to effective prisons on the mainland. It is unclear, though, if that will actually happen. This episode gives you a grounds-eye view of how Europe's harsh treatment of refugees. https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches

34 MIN15 h ago
Comments
Inside Europe's Largest Refugee Camp

What You Need to Know About Fossil Fuels and the Paris Climate Agreement Goals

Delegates, civil society and government officials from around the world are gathering in Madrid, Spain this week for the next big international climate change conference, known as COP 25. On the agenda are strategies to accelerate progress towards the Paris Agreement Goals of limiting global warming to 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius. But to reach the Paris Agreement goals, new research shows that countries need to dramatically reduce what is called the fossil fuel production gap. This gap is the difference between the fossil fuels that countries are planning to produce in the coming years and the necessary reduction in fossil fuel production required to halt global warming to1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius. The study was co-produced by a number of international non profit and research organizations and the United Nations Environment Program. The lead partner on this report was the Stockholm Environment Institute, and on the line with me is a scientist from the Stockholm Environment Institute, Pe...

27 MIN3 d ago
Comments
What You Need to Know About Fossil Fuels and the Paris Climate Agreement Goals

Crisis in Bolivia

On November 12th, longtime Bolivian president Evo Morales fled to Mexico, prompting a political and security crisis in the Bolivia. Evo Morales fled his country amid protests against alleged election rigging and after being threatened by Bolivia's military and security services. The circumstances of his ouster have lead some to conclude this was a coup. In his place, an interim and right-wing government has stepped up violent attacks against pro-Morales protesters. Several people have been killed by the security services in the protests that followed Morales' ouster. At time of recording, the situation remained fluid, with some talks between pro-Maduro and anti-Maduro factions on potential new elections. But the prospect of more violence is very much a reality. On the line to explain the roots of the crisis in Bolivia is Ivan Briscoe, Latin America director of the International Crisis Group. We kick off with a discussion of the unique place that Evo Morales holds in Latin American h...

32 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Crisis in Bolivia

A Brief History of Ukraine

The politics and recent history of Ukraine are suddenly quite central to the politics and history of the United States. In this episode of the Global Dispatches podcast we examine what the US impeachment inquiry looks like from Ukraine. Veteran journalist Steven Erlanger, who is the chief diplomatic correspondent in Europe for the New York Times explains the recent history of Ukraine, including the 2004 Orange Revolution which brought Viktor Yushenko to power; and later, how Yushenko was replaced by a more pro-Russian president named Victor Yonukovich, who subsequently fled to Russia during what was known as the Euromaidan revolution in 2014. We then discuss the improbable rise of a comedian turned politician, Volodymyr Zelensky who became president in April 2019 -- and how Zelensky has reacted to being thrust into the middle of a domestic political scandal in the United States. My intention with this episode is to give you a brief and accessible introduction to Ukrainian politics -...

32 MIN2 w ago
Comments
A Brief History of Ukraine

How to Win the Nobel Peace Prize

There are just five people in the world who decide each year who wins the Nobel Peace Prize -- and Asle Toje is one of them. Asle Toje is a foreign policy scholar and author. As of last year, he is also the newest member of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee. In our conversation, we discuss how one wins the Nobel Peace Prize. Asle Toje discusses some of the behind-the-scenes work of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, including the kinds of considerations that he and the other jurors make when deciding who should win the Nobel Peace Prize. To the extent possible, this conversation brings you inside the room where every Nobel Peace Prize winner has been decided for most of the last 105 years. We kick off with what with a discussion about the history of the Nobel Peace Prize and Alfred Nobel, before having an extended conversation about the process behind selecting the winner, certain controversies surrounding their decision over the years, and whether or not awarding the Nobel Pe...

33 MIN2 w ago
Comments
How to Win the Nobel Peace Prize

Why The Gambia is Suing Myanmar for Genocide

The small west African country of the Gambia has lodged a suit at the International Court of Justice against Myanmar for committing a genocide against the Rohingya people. The Rohingya are an ethnic and religious minority in Myanmar, who have long faced discrimination and persecution. But it was not until the summer and fall of 2017 that this persecution became a mass atrocity event, and arguably a genocide. Some 700,000 Rohingya fled violence in this time, and now more than a million live as refugees in neighboring Bangladesh. Justice for the Rohingya victims of genocide has so far been elusive. But this action at the International Court of Justice, which is a UN body based in the Hague, could be a significant turning point. On the line with me to discuss the significance of this lawsuit is Param-Preet Singh. She is an associate director of Human Rights Watch in the International Justice Program. And in our conversation she explains what exactly this law suit alleges, why Gambia is the country bringing the suit, and how this action advance the cause of justice for victims of crimes against humanity and change how. We kick off with a brief discussion of the International Court of Justice and how the judicial process at the ICJ works.

28 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Why The Gambia is Suing Myanmar for Genocide

Iraq Protests: A Reporter in Baghdad Explains Why Thousands of Iraqis are Protesting the Government

For the past several weeks, Washington Post reporter Mustafa Salim has had a front row view to massive protests that have erupted in Baghdad and other cities in Iraq. As he explains in this Global Dispatches podcast episode, these protests are neither centrally organized, nor do they have an explicit set of demands. Yet, they may prove to be powerful enough to bring down the Iraqi government of Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi. The protests began in early October, mostly by young men from poorer Shi'ite cities and towns angered by corruption and their own economic distress. But now, the protests have since expanded to include women and men from all walks of life. In our conversation, Mustafa Salim describes the scene on the ground in Baghdad where I reached him a few days ago. We discuss how these protests originated, where they may be heading, why Iran is a target of the protesters, and how humble drivers of three wheel taxis that cater to the urban poor, known as Tuk Tuks, became s...

27 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Iraq Protests: A Reporter in Baghdad Explains Why Thousands of Iraqis are Protesting the Government

How The Health and Welfare of Women and Girls Became an International Development Priority

Twenty five years ago, the city of Cairo, Egypt hosted a UN-backed gathering of international development professionals from nearly every country on the earth. That 1994 meeting was called the International Conference on Population and Development, or the ICPD, and it became one of the most significant global development gatherings of the last quarter century. At the conference over 170 countries signed was was known as an "action plan" that for the first time recognized fulfilling the rights of women and girls is central to development. That Cairo conference 25 conference firmly established what is now taken as a given around the UN and in the development community more broadly: that development is not possible without promoting the health and eduction of women and girls. That was 25 years ago. And this month, in Nairobi, Kenya global development experts, government officials and other key stakeholders are meeting for what is known as the Nairobi Summit ICPD25, to mark a quarter ce...

25 MINNOV 7
Comments
How The Health and Welfare of Women and Girls Became an International Development Priority

How Prepared are We for the Next Big Global Epidemic?

In 1976 Peter Piot was a 27-year-old microbiologist working in Belgium when he travelled to the Democratic Republic of Congo, then called Zaire, to investigate a particularly deadly disease outbreak. He took samples back to his lab and was among the team that first discovered the ebola virus. Today, he is one of the world's leading experts on epidemics and infectious diseases. This includes HIV/AIDS. In 1995, he was the founding director of the United Nations Program on AIDS, called UNAIDS, and served in that role until 2008. He is now the director of one of the world's most prestigious health research institutes, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. And on the podcast today, we talk about epidemics and what can be done to avert and contain them. This includes the ongoing ebola epidemic in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo,which is now the second worst ebola outbreak in history. And we also discuss what the world has gotten right -- and wrong ab...

29 MINNOV 4
Comments
How Prepared are We for the Next Big Global Epidemic?

Arab Countries Are Exporting their Fight to Far Away Battlefields

One of the driving forces of international relations over the last several years has been a rivalry between Arab states. This is sometimes called the "Gulf Crisis" and put simply, it refers to tensions and hostilities between Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates on the one hand; and Qatar on the other. The roots of this rivalry run deep, but around the time of the Arab Spring these tensions came very much to the surface. The United States has historically had a profound interest in mitigating hostilities between Gulf Arab states, principally because each of these countries are key US allies. The US, for example, has a major Navy base in Bahrain and a major Air Force base in Qatar. But the Trump administration has been less adept at keeping a lid on the hostilities between these countries. Now these tensions are not only affecting relations between Arab gulf states, but are also leaving a mark in other regions. As my guest today, Elizabeth Dickinson explains, the Gulf C...

30 MINOCT 31
Comments
Arab Countries Are Exporting their Fight to Far Away Battlefields

Latest Episodes

Inside Europe's Largest Refugee Camp

The Moria Refugee Camp on the island of Lesvos, Greece is the largest refugee camp in Europe. The camp has an official capacity of just over 2,000 people. But the population is now more than 17,000, with most people living in makeshift shelters in fields and olive groves on the island. In recent months the number of refugees arriving at Lesvos by boat from Turkey has sharply increased. This is following the breakdown of a 2016 agreement between Turkey and the European Union in which Turkey largely stopped boat departures from its shores. Now, thousands of refugees are once again arriving on the Greek Islands. Over 3,000 people have arrived in November alone. Needless to say, the conditions on the island of Lesvos are horrendous. People are stuck there, seemingly in perpetual limbo as they asylum claims are processed and they await transfer to the mainland. On the line with me to discuss the situation on Lesvos is Dr. Siyana Shaffi. She is the founder of the NGO Kitrinos which provides healthcare to refugees in Greece. She recently returned from Camp Moria when we spoke in November and in this conversation she gives you a real sense of the harsh conditions faced by refugees stranded on an island in Europe. Since we spoke, the government of Greece announced somewhat nebulous plans to close the camp and transfer its residents to effective prisons on the mainland. It is unclear, though, if that will actually happen. This episode gives you a grounds-eye view of how Europe's harsh treatment of refugees. https://www.patreon.com/GlobalDispatches

34 MIN15 h ago
Comments
Inside Europe's Largest Refugee Camp

What You Need to Know About Fossil Fuels and the Paris Climate Agreement Goals

Delegates, civil society and government officials from around the world are gathering in Madrid, Spain this week for the next big international climate change conference, known as COP 25. On the agenda are strategies to accelerate progress towards the Paris Agreement Goals of limiting global warming to 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius. But to reach the Paris Agreement goals, new research shows that countries need to dramatically reduce what is called the fossil fuel production gap. This gap is the difference between the fossil fuels that countries are planning to produce in the coming years and the necessary reduction in fossil fuel production required to halt global warming to1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius. The study was co-produced by a number of international non profit and research organizations and the United Nations Environment Program. The lead partner on this report was the Stockholm Environment Institute, and on the line with me is a scientist from the Stockholm Environment Institute, Pe...

27 MIN3 d ago
Comments
What You Need to Know About Fossil Fuels and the Paris Climate Agreement Goals

Crisis in Bolivia

On November 12th, longtime Bolivian president Evo Morales fled to Mexico, prompting a political and security crisis in the Bolivia. Evo Morales fled his country amid protests against alleged election rigging and after being threatened by Bolivia's military and security services. The circumstances of his ouster have lead some to conclude this was a coup. In his place, an interim and right-wing government has stepped up violent attacks against pro-Morales protesters. Several people have been killed by the security services in the protests that followed Morales' ouster. At time of recording, the situation remained fluid, with some talks between pro-Maduro and anti-Maduro factions on potential new elections. But the prospect of more violence is very much a reality. On the line to explain the roots of the crisis in Bolivia is Ivan Briscoe, Latin America director of the International Crisis Group. We kick off with a discussion of the unique place that Evo Morales holds in Latin American h...

32 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Crisis in Bolivia

A Brief History of Ukraine

The politics and recent history of Ukraine are suddenly quite central to the politics and history of the United States. In this episode of the Global Dispatches podcast we examine what the US impeachment inquiry looks like from Ukraine. Veteran journalist Steven Erlanger, who is the chief diplomatic correspondent in Europe for the New York Times explains the recent history of Ukraine, including the 2004 Orange Revolution which brought Viktor Yushenko to power; and later, how Yushenko was replaced by a more pro-Russian president named Victor Yonukovich, who subsequently fled to Russia during what was known as the Euromaidan revolution in 2014. We then discuss the improbable rise of a comedian turned politician, Volodymyr Zelensky who became president in April 2019 -- and how Zelensky has reacted to being thrust into the middle of a domestic political scandal in the United States. My intention with this episode is to give you a brief and accessible introduction to Ukrainian politics -...

32 MIN2 w ago
Comments
A Brief History of Ukraine

How to Win the Nobel Peace Prize

There are just five people in the world who decide each year who wins the Nobel Peace Prize -- and Asle Toje is one of them. Asle Toje is a foreign policy scholar and author. As of last year, he is also the newest member of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee. In our conversation, we discuss how one wins the Nobel Peace Prize. Asle Toje discusses some of the behind-the-scenes work of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee, including the kinds of considerations that he and the other jurors make when deciding who should win the Nobel Peace Prize. To the extent possible, this conversation brings you inside the room where every Nobel Peace Prize winner has been decided for most of the last 105 years. We kick off with what with a discussion about the history of the Nobel Peace Prize and Alfred Nobel, before having an extended conversation about the process behind selecting the winner, certain controversies surrounding their decision over the years, and whether or not awarding the Nobel Pe...

33 MIN2 w ago
Comments
How to Win the Nobel Peace Prize

Why The Gambia is Suing Myanmar for Genocide

The small west African country of the Gambia has lodged a suit at the International Court of Justice against Myanmar for committing a genocide against the Rohingya people. The Rohingya are an ethnic and religious minority in Myanmar, who have long faced discrimination and persecution. But it was not until the summer and fall of 2017 that this persecution became a mass atrocity event, and arguably a genocide. Some 700,000 Rohingya fled violence in this time, and now more than a million live as refugees in neighboring Bangladesh. Justice for the Rohingya victims of genocide has so far been elusive. But this action at the International Court of Justice, which is a UN body based in the Hague, could be a significant turning point. On the line with me to discuss the significance of this lawsuit is Param-Preet Singh. She is an associate director of Human Rights Watch in the International Justice Program. And in our conversation she explains what exactly this law suit alleges, why Gambia is the country bringing the suit, and how this action advance the cause of justice for victims of crimes against humanity and change how. We kick off with a brief discussion of the International Court of Justice and how the judicial process at the ICJ works.

28 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Why The Gambia is Suing Myanmar for Genocide

Iraq Protests: A Reporter in Baghdad Explains Why Thousands of Iraqis are Protesting the Government

For the past several weeks, Washington Post reporter Mustafa Salim has had a front row view to massive protests that have erupted in Baghdad and other cities in Iraq. As he explains in this Global Dispatches podcast episode, these protests are neither centrally organized, nor do they have an explicit set of demands. Yet, they may prove to be powerful enough to bring down the Iraqi government of Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi. The protests began in early October, mostly by young men from poorer Shi'ite cities and towns angered by corruption and their own economic distress. But now, the protests have since expanded to include women and men from all walks of life. In our conversation, Mustafa Salim describes the scene on the ground in Baghdad where I reached him a few days ago. We discuss how these protests originated, where they may be heading, why Iran is a target of the protesters, and how humble drivers of three wheel taxis that cater to the urban poor, known as Tuk Tuks, became s...

27 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Iraq Protests: A Reporter in Baghdad Explains Why Thousands of Iraqis are Protesting the Government

How The Health and Welfare of Women and Girls Became an International Development Priority

Twenty five years ago, the city of Cairo, Egypt hosted a UN-backed gathering of international development professionals from nearly every country on the earth. That 1994 meeting was called the International Conference on Population and Development, or the ICPD, and it became one of the most significant global development gatherings of the last quarter century. At the conference over 170 countries signed was was known as an "action plan" that for the first time recognized fulfilling the rights of women and girls is central to development. That Cairo conference 25 conference firmly established what is now taken as a given around the UN and in the development community more broadly: that development is not possible without promoting the health and eduction of women and girls. That was 25 years ago. And this month, in Nairobi, Kenya global development experts, government officials and other key stakeholders are meeting for what is known as the Nairobi Summit ICPD25, to mark a quarter ce...

25 MINNOV 7
Comments
How The Health and Welfare of Women and Girls Became an International Development Priority

How Prepared are We for the Next Big Global Epidemic?

In 1976 Peter Piot was a 27-year-old microbiologist working in Belgium when he travelled to the Democratic Republic of Congo, then called Zaire, to investigate a particularly deadly disease outbreak. He took samples back to his lab and was among the team that first discovered the ebola virus. Today, he is one of the world's leading experts on epidemics and infectious diseases. This includes HIV/AIDS. In 1995, he was the founding director of the United Nations Program on AIDS, called UNAIDS, and served in that role until 2008. He is now the director of one of the world's most prestigious health research institutes, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. And on the podcast today, we talk about epidemics and what can be done to avert and contain them. This includes the ongoing ebola epidemic in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo,which is now the second worst ebola outbreak in history. And we also discuss what the world has gotten right -- and wrong ab...

29 MINNOV 4
Comments
How Prepared are We for the Next Big Global Epidemic?

Arab Countries Are Exporting their Fight to Far Away Battlefields

One of the driving forces of international relations over the last several years has been a rivalry between Arab states. This is sometimes called the "Gulf Crisis" and put simply, it refers to tensions and hostilities between Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates on the one hand; and Qatar on the other. The roots of this rivalry run deep, but around the time of the Arab Spring these tensions came very much to the surface. The United States has historically had a profound interest in mitigating hostilities between Gulf Arab states, principally because each of these countries are key US allies. The US, for example, has a major Navy base in Bahrain and a major Air Force base in Qatar. But the Trump administration has been less adept at keeping a lid on the hostilities between these countries. Now these tensions are not only affecting relations between Arab gulf states, but are also leaving a mark in other regions. As my guest today, Elizabeth Dickinson explains, the Gulf C...

30 MINOCT 31
Comments
Arab Countries Are Exporting their Fight to Far Away Battlefields
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。