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Harvard Center for International Development

Harvard Center for International Development

9
Followers
3
Plays
Harvard Center for International Development

Harvard Center for International Development

Harvard Center for International Development

9
Followers
3
Plays
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About Us

The Center for International Development (CID) at Harvard University is a university-wide center that works to advance the understanding of development challenges and offer viable solutions to problems of global poverty. CID is Harvard’s leading research hub focusing on resolving the dilemmas of public policy associated with generating stable, shared, and sustainable prosperity in developing countries. Our ongoing mission is to apply knowledge to and revolutionize the world of development practice.WWW.CID.HARVARD.EDU

Latest Episodes

The Value of Complementary Coworkers

In today’s world, most workers are highly specialized, but this specialization can come at a cost – especially for those on the wrong team. New research by Growth Lab Research Director Frank Neffke assesses the importance of the skills of coworkers. Finding coworkers who complement and not substitute one’s skills can significantly impact earning potential. The impact is equal to having a college degree. Coworker complementarity also drives careers and supports urban and large plant wage premiums. Learn more about this new research on The Value of Complementary Coworkers: https://growthlab.cid.harvard.edu/academic-research/complementarity About Frank Neffke: Frank Neffke is the Research Director of the Growth Lab at the Center for International Development. He joined the team in 2012. His research focuses on economic transformation and growth, from the macro level of structural change in regional and national economies to the micro level of firm diversification and the career paths of individuals. This research has shed light on topics ranging from structural transformation and new growth paths in regional economies, economic complexity and the role of cities, local labor markets, the importance of division of labor, human capital and teams in modern economies, the consequences of job displacement and the future of work. Before joining the CID, Frank worked as an assistant professor at the Erasmus School of Economics in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. He holds a Ph. D. in Economic Geography from Utrecht University and Master degrees in Econometrics and Philosophy from the University of Amsterdam.

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Value of Complementary Coworkers

A New Approach to Education in Pakistan: Helping Schools Help Themselves

On this week's Speaker Series podcast, we are joined by Zainab Qureshi, the LEAPS (Learning and Educational Achievement in Pakistan Schools) Senior Program Manager at the Center for International Development’s EPoD (Evidence for Policy Design). Zainab will be speaking about EPoD’s research on alleviating system-level constraints to improve student learning outcomes in Pakistan. // Originally recorded on December 6, 2019. About the talk: School enrollment is up in Pakistan, but student learning outcomes remain vastly sub-standard. At same time, widespread local entrepreneurship has dramatically changed Pakistan's education landscape, with 42% of school-going children now attending low cost private schools. Transformational research by the LEAPS program shows thatimproving education quality will require moving beyond the traditional approach of input augmentation towards a new, systems-based approach that explores how to catalyze innovation in the entire education ecosystem and help...

11 MIN2019 DEC 17
Comments
A New Approach to Education in Pakistan: Helping Schools Help Themselves

Information and Social Norms: Experimental Evidence on the Labor Market Aspirations of Saudi Women

How important are social constraints and information gaps about the labor market in explaining the low rates of female labor force participation (FLFP) in societies that are undergoing change, but have conservative gender norms? To answer this question, we conducted a field experiment embedded in a survey of female university students at a large public university in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We randomly provided one subset of individuals with information on the labor market and aspirations of their female peers (T1), while another subset was provided with this information along with a prime that made the role of parents and family more salient (T2). We find that expectations of working among those in the Control group are quite high, yet students underestimate the expected labor force attachment of their female peers. We show that information matters: relative to the Control group, expectations about own labor force participation are significantly higher in the T1 group. We find ...

15 MIN2019 DEC 6
Comments
Information and Social Norms: Experimental Evidence on the Labor Market Aspirations of Saudi Women

Venture Capital in Developing Markets

What does it take to grow entrepreneurial ecosystems in the developing world? The talk will share some lessons from our experience at Alter across 14 markets in SE Asia and Africa. Specifically, the talk will focus on three aspects of early-stage entrepreneurship in such markets: (i) thin capital markets and the implications for early stage companies and ventures; (ii) the demand-supply gaps in the high-skill labor market (and the role of the diaspora); and (iii) the potential for using a network-based sourcing and investment model within small, dense ecosystems. // Interview recorded on October 25, 2019. In this Speaker Series podcast, CID Student Ambassador Valeria sits down for a discussion with Ozair Ali, co-founder and COO of Alter Global - a network of tech entrepreneurs across emerging cities in the world. Ozair works with entrepreneurs to provide them with access to talent and capital. Ozair has previously worked at the Central Bank of Pakistan and at CID at Harvard University. He holds an MBA from Stanford University and an MPA/ID from Harvard University. Podcast edited by Charles Hua '22

16 MIN2019 DEC 2
Comments
Venture Capital in Developing Markets

Alice Evans on Gender and Social Change

Support for gender equality has increased globally, and studies of this trend usually examine individual- and/or country-level factors. However, this overlooks subnational variation. City-dwellers are more likely to support gender equality in education, employment, leadership, and leisure. Alice Evans, lecturer at Kings College London, sat down with Salimah Samji, Director of the Building State Capability program at CID to discuss her investigation into the causes of rural–urban differences through comparative, qualitative research in Cambodia. Dr. Alice Evans is a Lecturer at King's College London as well as a Research Associate at CID’s Building State Capacity program. She researches social norms and how they change and is currently writing a book on how societies come to support gender equality. Interview originally recorded on October 30, 2018.

16 MIN2019 NOV 21
Comments
Alice Evans on Gender and Social Change

Transforming Humanitarian Response towards Local Humanitarian Leadership

We are at a crossroads in the humanitarian community. Despite global commitments made in 2016 to shift power away from international to local actors to lead during crisis response, little has changed. We know that humanitarian action led by responsible governments in crisis-affected countries, assisted and held accountable by civil society, can more quickly save lives and act more appropriately to meet the needs of local populations. Simply put, governments and civil society in crisis-affected contexts should be leading humanitarian action wherever possible, with international actors assuming a supporting role. How do we get there? Fatema will share examples from recent crises in Mozambique, Indonesia, and the Philippines and explore how we can transform global humanitarian response towards local humanitarian leadership. In this CID Speaker Series podcast, CID student ambassador Mark sits down with Fatema Sumar, VP for Global Programs at Oxfam America to discuss the need for transformation in humanitarian response towards local humanitarian leadership. // Interview recorded on October 11, 2019. About the Speaker: Fatema Z. Sumar joined Oxfam America in 2018 as Vice President of Global Programs, where she oversees our regional development and humanitarian response programs. Fatema comes to Oxfam with a distinguished career in the U.S. government, leading U.S. efforts to advance sustainable development and economic policy in emerging markets and fragile countries. Most recently, she served as Regional Deputy Vice President for Europe, Asia, Pacific, and Latin America at the U.S. Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), where she managed investments focused on international growth and poverty reduction. Prior to MCC, she served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asia at the U.S. Department of State and as a Senior Professional Staff Member on the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Fatema holds a Master’s in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School and a Bachelor of Arts in Government from Cornell University. She studied abroad at the American University in Cairo.

22 MIN2019 NOV 8
Comments
Transforming Humanitarian Response towards Local Humanitarian Leadership

Michael Kremer In Conversation With Harvard Students

Harvard’s Center for International Development brought together students and scholars from across the university to celebrate 2019 Nobel Laureate Michael Kremer as he spoke about his own innovative work as well as that of his colleagues and co-laureates in the field of international development. Kremer is a member of the CID’s Faculty Advisory Council, which oversees the University-wide research center working on development challenges and solutions to global poverty. The event took place on Tuesday, November 5th in the Smith Center’s public auditorium and drew more than 200 attendees to Harvard Commons to hear Kremer speak. Throughout the evening, Kremer’s insights, the questions posed, and the sheer diversity of the expertise represented in the room came together to send a clear message: international development necessarily requires and inevitably draws scholars from a variety of fields and disciplines. Kremer’s work testifies to the synergistic relationship between research and practice: efforts to affect real change in the world are most fruitful when the academic exercises of theory and experimentation are undertaken alongside and directly informed by policymakers, practitioners, and the research beneficiaries themselves. Check CID's Youtube page for a video recording of the event: https://www.youtube.com/user/HarvardCID Follow our Twitter for more upcoming events from CID: https://twitter.com/HarvardCID

73 MIN2019 NOV 7
Comments
Michael Kremer In Conversation With Harvard Students

Progress and Enduring Challenges for the Health of Children in India

Roughly one in every five births occurs in India. Data reveal that despite improvements in the last decade, Indian children are still among the most unhealthy in the world. In the state of Uttar Pradesh, which is home to 200 million people, 45 out of every 1000 babies die in the first month of life. That is a higher rate of neonatal death than any country in the world except Pakistan. Why does child health remain an enduring challenge for the Indian population? Despite recent government programs to encourage hospital birth and build toilets, discrimination against women and people from the lower castes continues to harm child health. Today on CID's Speaker Series Podcast, Rohan Sandhu, CID student Ambassador, interviews Diane Coffey, a demographer who studies social influences on health in India. Diane co-directs r.i.c.e., a research institute for compassionate economics, which does research and policy advocacy for child health in India. www.hks.harvard.edu/centers/cid Interview recorded on October 4th, 2019. About Diane: Diane Coffey is a demographer who studies social influences on health in India. One area of her research focuses on the intergenerational transmission of poor population health resulting from India's exceptionally poor maternal nutrition. Another area of her research investigates the causes and consequences of open defecation in rural India. Diane has an MPA and a PhD Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School, and is currently an assistant professor of Sociology and Population Research at the University of Texas at Austin. She co-directs r.i.c.e., a research institute for compassionate economics, which does research and policy advocacy for child health in India.

18 MIN2019 NOV 1
Comments
Progress and Enduring Challenges for the Health of Children in India

Bleeding Out

Urban violence is one of the most divisive and allegedly intractable issues of our time. But as CID Senior Research Fellow Thomas Abt writes in his new book Bleeding Out, we actually possess all the tools necessary to stem violence in our cities. Coupling the latest social science with firsthand experiences in policymaking, Abt proposes a relentless focus on violence itself—not drugs, gangs, or guns. Because violence is clustering among small groups of people and places, it can be predicted and prevented using a series of evidence-informed, data-driven strategies, both in the United States and in Latin America, where 41 of the 50 most violent cities are located. In this CID Speaker Series podcast produced by Growth Lab, Rushabh Sanghvi, Research Assistant at the Growth Lab interviews Thomas Abt on his latest book and its practical solutions to the global emergency of urban violence. // https://amzn.to/2YwjsLN // Interview recorded on September 27th, 2019. About Thomas Abt: Thomas A...

17 MIN2019 OCT 18
Comments
Bleeding Out

From Them to Us: Power, Privilege and Responsibility in a Shrinking World

The logical extension of today’s ferment in America about white privilege and male entitlement is, at the global level, about the responsibility of the United States and its citizens to the world’s poor, of all races and cultures, and especially to the world’s disempowered women in poor countries. What are the responsibilities to them of us, with privilege and power? Today on the return CID's weekly Speaker Series podcast, Growth Lab Research Assistant Ana Grisanti speaks with Nancy Birdsall about key themes in her upcoming work memoir. Nancy draws on her own life experience being born into membership of the benighted cosmopolitan elite and stumbling into work as a development economist, as a metaphor for growing awareness of the depth and costs of inequality in the world; the centrality to development of the women’s movement and women’s agency in a world of persistent patriarchy; and the challenge of global governance in a system of sovereign nations facing new risks in an interdependent, “shrinking” world. About the Speaker: Nancy Birdsall is president emeritus and a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, a policy-oriented research institution that opened its doors in Washington, DC in October 2001. Prior to launching the center, Birdsall served for three years as senior associate and director of the Economic Reform Project at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Her work at Carnegie focused on issues of globalization and inequality, as well as on the reform of the international financial institutions. From 1993 to 1998, Birdsall was executive vice-president of the Inter-American Development Bank, the largest of the regional development banks, where she oversaw a $30 billion public and private loan portfolio. Before joining the Inter-American Development Bank, she spent 14 years in research, policy, and management positions at the World Bank, most recently as director of the Policy Research Department. Birdsall has been researching and writing on economic development issues for more than 25 years. Her most recent work focuses on the relationship between income distribution and economic growth and the role of regional public goods in development. Birdsall holds a PhD in economics from Yale University and an MA in international relations from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. You can learn more about Nancy's work at https://www.cgdev.org/expert/nancy-birdsall. Nancy welcomes comments directly at nbirdsall@cgdev.org.

21 MIN2019 SEP 27
Comments
From Them to Us: Power, Privilege and Responsibility in a Shrinking World

Latest Episodes

The Value of Complementary Coworkers

In today’s world, most workers are highly specialized, but this specialization can come at a cost – especially for those on the wrong team. New research by Growth Lab Research Director Frank Neffke assesses the importance of the skills of coworkers. Finding coworkers who complement and not substitute one’s skills can significantly impact earning potential. The impact is equal to having a college degree. Coworker complementarity also drives careers and supports urban and large plant wage premiums. Learn more about this new research on The Value of Complementary Coworkers: https://growthlab.cid.harvard.edu/academic-research/complementarity About Frank Neffke: Frank Neffke is the Research Director of the Growth Lab at the Center for International Development. He joined the team in 2012. His research focuses on economic transformation and growth, from the macro level of structural change in regional and national economies to the micro level of firm diversification and the career paths of individuals. This research has shed light on topics ranging from structural transformation and new growth paths in regional economies, economic complexity and the role of cities, local labor markets, the importance of division of labor, human capital and teams in modern economies, the consequences of job displacement and the future of work. Before joining the CID, Frank worked as an assistant professor at the Erasmus School of Economics in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. He holds a Ph. D. in Economic Geography from Utrecht University and Master degrees in Econometrics and Philosophy from the University of Amsterdam.

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Value of Complementary Coworkers

A New Approach to Education in Pakistan: Helping Schools Help Themselves

On this week's Speaker Series podcast, we are joined by Zainab Qureshi, the LEAPS (Learning and Educational Achievement in Pakistan Schools) Senior Program Manager at the Center for International Development’s EPoD (Evidence for Policy Design). Zainab will be speaking about EPoD’s research on alleviating system-level constraints to improve student learning outcomes in Pakistan. // Originally recorded on December 6, 2019. About the talk: School enrollment is up in Pakistan, but student learning outcomes remain vastly sub-standard. At same time, widespread local entrepreneurship has dramatically changed Pakistan's education landscape, with 42% of school-going children now attending low cost private schools. Transformational research by the LEAPS program shows thatimproving education quality will require moving beyond the traditional approach of input augmentation towards a new, systems-based approach that explores how to catalyze innovation in the entire education ecosystem and help...

11 MIN2019 DEC 17
Comments
A New Approach to Education in Pakistan: Helping Schools Help Themselves

Information and Social Norms: Experimental Evidence on the Labor Market Aspirations of Saudi Women

How important are social constraints and information gaps about the labor market in explaining the low rates of female labor force participation (FLFP) in societies that are undergoing change, but have conservative gender norms? To answer this question, we conducted a field experiment embedded in a survey of female university students at a large public university in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We randomly provided one subset of individuals with information on the labor market and aspirations of their female peers (T1), while another subset was provided with this information along with a prime that made the role of parents and family more salient (T2). We find that expectations of working among those in the Control group are quite high, yet students underestimate the expected labor force attachment of their female peers. We show that information matters: relative to the Control group, expectations about own labor force participation are significantly higher in the T1 group. We find ...

15 MIN2019 DEC 6
Comments
Information and Social Norms: Experimental Evidence on the Labor Market Aspirations of Saudi Women

Venture Capital in Developing Markets

What does it take to grow entrepreneurial ecosystems in the developing world? The talk will share some lessons from our experience at Alter across 14 markets in SE Asia and Africa. Specifically, the talk will focus on three aspects of early-stage entrepreneurship in such markets: (i) thin capital markets and the implications for early stage companies and ventures; (ii) the demand-supply gaps in the high-skill labor market (and the role of the diaspora); and (iii) the potential for using a network-based sourcing and investment model within small, dense ecosystems. // Interview recorded on October 25, 2019. In this Speaker Series podcast, CID Student Ambassador Valeria sits down for a discussion with Ozair Ali, co-founder and COO of Alter Global - a network of tech entrepreneurs across emerging cities in the world. Ozair works with entrepreneurs to provide them with access to talent and capital. Ozair has previously worked at the Central Bank of Pakistan and at CID at Harvard University. He holds an MBA from Stanford University and an MPA/ID from Harvard University. Podcast edited by Charles Hua '22

16 MIN2019 DEC 2
Comments
Venture Capital in Developing Markets

Alice Evans on Gender and Social Change

Support for gender equality has increased globally, and studies of this trend usually examine individual- and/or country-level factors. However, this overlooks subnational variation. City-dwellers are more likely to support gender equality in education, employment, leadership, and leisure. Alice Evans, lecturer at Kings College London, sat down with Salimah Samji, Director of the Building State Capability program at CID to discuss her investigation into the causes of rural–urban differences through comparative, qualitative research in Cambodia. Dr. Alice Evans is a Lecturer at King's College London as well as a Research Associate at CID’s Building State Capacity program. She researches social norms and how they change and is currently writing a book on how societies come to support gender equality. Interview originally recorded on October 30, 2018.

16 MIN2019 NOV 21
Comments
Alice Evans on Gender and Social Change

Transforming Humanitarian Response towards Local Humanitarian Leadership

We are at a crossroads in the humanitarian community. Despite global commitments made in 2016 to shift power away from international to local actors to lead during crisis response, little has changed. We know that humanitarian action led by responsible governments in crisis-affected countries, assisted and held accountable by civil society, can more quickly save lives and act more appropriately to meet the needs of local populations. Simply put, governments and civil society in crisis-affected contexts should be leading humanitarian action wherever possible, with international actors assuming a supporting role. How do we get there? Fatema will share examples from recent crises in Mozambique, Indonesia, and the Philippines and explore how we can transform global humanitarian response towards local humanitarian leadership. In this CID Speaker Series podcast, CID student ambassador Mark sits down with Fatema Sumar, VP for Global Programs at Oxfam America to discuss the need for transformation in humanitarian response towards local humanitarian leadership. // Interview recorded on October 11, 2019. About the Speaker: Fatema Z. Sumar joined Oxfam America in 2018 as Vice President of Global Programs, where she oversees our regional development and humanitarian response programs. Fatema comes to Oxfam with a distinguished career in the U.S. government, leading U.S. efforts to advance sustainable development and economic policy in emerging markets and fragile countries. Most recently, she served as Regional Deputy Vice President for Europe, Asia, Pacific, and Latin America at the U.S. Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), where she managed investments focused on international growth and poverty reduction. Prior to MCC, she served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asia at the U.S. Department of State and as a Senior Professional Staff Member on the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Fatema holds a Master’s in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School and a Bachelor of Arts in Government from Cornell University. She studied abroad at the American University in Cairo.

22 MIN2019 NOV 8
Comments
Transforming Humanitarian Response towards Local Humanitarian Leadership

Michael Kremer In Conversation With Harvard Students

Harvard’s Center for International Development brought together students and scholars from across the university to celebrate 2019 Nobel Laureate Michael Kremer as he spoke about his own innovative work as well as that of his colleagues and co-laureates in the field of international development. Kremer is a member of the CID’s Faculty Advisory Council, which oversees the University-wide research center working on development challenges and solutions to global poverty. The event took place on Tuesday, November 5th in the Smith Center’s public auditorium and drew more than 200 attendees to Harvard Commons to hear Kremer speak. Throughout the evening, Kremer’s insights, the questions posed, and the sheer diversity of the expertise represented in the room came together to send a clear message: international development necessarily requires and inevitably draws scholars from a variety of fields and disciplines. Kremer’s work testifies to the synergistic relationship between research and practice: efforts to affect real change in the world are most fruitful when the academic exercises of theory and experimentation are undertaken alongside and directly informed by policymakers, practitioners, and the research beneficiaries themselves. Check CID's Youtube page for a video recording of the event: https://www.youtube.com/user/HarvardCID Follow our Twitter for more upcoming events from CID: https://twitter.com/HarvardCID

73 MIN2019 NOV 7
Comments
Michael Kremer In Conversation With Harvard Students

Progress and Enduring Challenges for the Health of Children in India

Roughly one in every five births occurs in India. Data reveal that despite improvements in the last decade, Indian children are still among the most unhealthy in the world. In the state of Uttar Pradesh, which is home to 200 million people, 45 out of every 1000 babies die in the first month of life. That is a higher rate of neonatal death than any country in the world except Pakistan. Why does child health remain an enduring challenge for the Indian population? Despite recent government programs to encourage hospital birth and build toilets, discrimination against women and people from the lower castes continues to harm child health. Today on CID's Speaker Series Podcast, Rohan Sandhu, CID student Ambassador, interviews Diane Coffey, a demographer who studies social influences on health in India. Diane co-directs r.i.c.e., a research institute for compassionate economics, which does research and policy advocacy for child health in India. www.hks.harvard.edu/centers/cid Interview recorded on October 4th, 2019. About Diane: Diane Coffey is a demographer who studies social influences on health in India. One area of her research focuses on the intergenerational transmission of poor population health resulting from India's exceptionally poor maternal nutrition. Another area of her research investigates the causes and consequences of open defecation in rural India. Diane has an MPA and a PhD Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School, and is currently an assistant professor of Sociology and Population Research at the University of Texas at Austin. She co-directs r.i.c.e., a research institute for compassionate economics, which does research and policy advocacy for child health in India.

18 MIN2019 NOV 1
Comments
Progress and Enduring Challenges for the Health of Children in India

Bleeding Out

Urban violence is one of the most divisive and allegedly intractable issues of our time. But as CID Senior Research Fellow Thomas Abt writes in his new book Bleeding Out, we actually possess all the tools necessary to stem violence in our cities. Coupling the latest social science with firsthand experiences in policymaking, Abt proposes a relentless focus on violence itself—not drugs, gangs, or guns. Because violence is clustering among small groups of people and places, it can be predicted and prevented using a series of evidence-informed, data-driven strategies, both in the United States and in Latin America, where 41 of the 50 most violent cities are located. In this CID Speaker Series podcast produced by Growth Lab, Rushabh Sanghvi, Research Assistant at the Growth Lab interviews Thomas Abt on his latest book and its practical solutions to the global emergency of urban violence. // https://amzn.to/2YwjsLN // Interview recorded on September 27th, 2019. About Thomas Abt: Thomas A...

17 MIN2019 OCT 18
Comments
Bleeding Out

From Them to Us: Power, Privilege and Responsibility in a Shrinking World

The logical extension of today’s ferment in America about white privilege and male entitlement is, at the global level, about the responsibility of the United States and its citizens to the world’s poor, of all races and cultures, and especially to the world’s disempowered women in poor countries. What are the responsibilities to them of us, with privilege and power? Today on the return CID's weekly Speaker Series podcast, Growth Lab Research Assistant Ana Grisanti speaks with Nancy Birdsall about key themes in her upcoming work memoir. Nancy draws on her own life experience being born into membership of the benighted cosmopolitan elite and stumbling into work as a development economist, as a metaphor for growing awareness of the depth and costs of inequality in the world; the centrality to development of the women’s movement and women’s agency in a world of persistent patriarchy; and the challenge of global governance in a system of sovereign nations facing new risks in an interdependent, “shrinking” world. About the Speaker: Nancy Birdsall is president emeritus and a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, a policy-oriented research institution that opened its doors in Washington, DC in October 2001. Prior to launching the center, Birdsall served for three years as senior associate and director of the Economic Reform Project at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Her work at Carnegie focused on issues of globalization and inequality, as well as on the reform of the international financial institutions. From 1993 to 1998, Birdsall was executive vice-president of the Inter-American Development Bank, the largest of the regional development banks, where she oversaw a $30 billion public and private loan portfolio. Before joining the Inter-American Development Bank, she spent 14 years in research, policy, and management positions at the World Bank, most recently as director of the Policy Research Department. Birdsall has been researching and writing on economic development issues for more than 25 years. Her most recent work focuses on the relationship between income distribution and economic growth and the role of regional public goods in development. Birdsall holds a PhD in economics from Yale University and an MA in international relations from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. You can learn more about Nancy's work at https://www.cgdev.org/expert/nancy-birdsall. Nancy welcomes comments directly at nbirdsall@cgdev.org.

21 MIN2019 SEP 27
Comments
From Them to Us: Power, Privilege and Responsibility in a Shrinking World
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