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King's College London Middle East & North Africa Podcast

King's College London Department of Middle Eastern

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King's College London Middle East & North Africa Podcast
King's College London Middle East & North Africa Podcast

King's College London Middle East & North Africa Podcast

King's College London Department of Middle Eastern

3
Followers
0
Plays
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About Us

Established in September 2018, the Institute of Middle Eastern Studies draws together staff and students from across King’s College London working on the Middle East and North Africa.Based in a dozen departments, its over 30 faculty members produce world-class research on every country in the region. They are routinely asked by policy makers, civil society groups and media outlets both in the UK and elsewhere to provide expert analysis on events and developments in this important part of the world.www.kcl.ac.uk/imeshttp://fb.me/KingsMiddleEasternStudiestwitter.com/KingsMiddleEast

Latest Episodes

The Media, Politics And Dissent In North Africa Since The Arab Spring

This is a recording of the IMES Inaugural Conference titled 'The Media, Politics and Dissent in North Africa Since the Arab Spring' which took place on 25 September 2019. 00:00 Introductions: Fatima El-Issawi and Jonathan Hill 13:30 Panel #1: The media and authoritarian resilience Chair: Jonathan Hill Speakers: (1) Francesco Cavatorta; (2) Kjetil Selvick; (3) Hendrick Kraetzschmar. 1:23:45 Panel #2: The media and political accountability since the Arab Spring Chair: Dina Mattar Speakers: (1) Roxane Farmanfarmaian; (2) Boubaker Jamaei; (3) Fatima el-Issawi. 2:50:50 Panel #3: New medias, new dissent? Chair: Charis Boutieri Speakers: (1) Christina Moreno-Almeida; (2) Chaima Bouhel; (3) Omar Radi. 4:24:20 Closing address: Omar Belhouchet

347 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
The Media, Politics And Dissent In North Africa Since The Arab Spring

Law & Revolution: Legitimacy and Constitutionalism After the Arab Spring

A public lecture delivered by Dr Nimer Sultany (School of Law, SOAS) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London on 30 January 2018. What is the effect of revolutions on legal systems? What role do constitutions play in legitimating regimes? How do constitutions and revolutions converge or clash? This talk address these and other constitutional questions about the Arab Uprisings by drawing on the findings in the speaker's recently published book. The book, Law and Revolution: Legitimacy and Constitutionalism After the Arab Spring (Oxford University Press, 2017), urges a rethinking of major categories in political, legal, and constitutional theory in light of the Arab Spring. It offers a novel and comprehensive examination of the constitutional order that preceded and followed the Arab Spring in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Morocco, Jordan, Algeria, Oman, and Bahrain. It also provides the first thorough discussion of the trials of former regime officials in Egypt and...

91 MIN2018 JAN 31
Comments
Law & Revolution: Legitimacy and Constitutionalism After the Arab Spring

Reflections on the Tunisian Revolution and its Aftermath

"Neoliberal Development, Protests and Mobilizations Between the Urban and Rural: Reflections on the Tunisian Revolution and its Aftermath" A public lecture delivered by Prof. Sami Zemni (Ghent University) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London on 7 November 2017. This presentation engages in the debate on urban contentious politics by returning to the Tunisian revolution. I reflect on how movements, provoked by neoliberal restructurings, emerged, and show how these ultimately came together to form a mass movement demanding radical political change. By analyzing the socio-spatial roots of the Tunisian revolution and by sketching the classes, social groups and movements that coalesced against authoritarian rule in early 2011, I will argue that new urban social movements have deployed new strategies of action, repertoires of contention, created new networks of solidarity and activism and how, in the end, new forms of collective mobilization and claim making ...

99 MIN2017 NOV 10
Comments
Reflections on the Tunisian Revolution and its Aftermath

When Islamists Lose: The Politicization of Tunisia's al-Nahda

In this talk delivered at King's on 10 October 2017, Dr Rory McCarthy (University of Oxford) asks how competitive electoral contests have transformed an Islamist movement by looking at the internal debates and struggles that have shaped Tunisia’s al-Nahda since 2011. Drawing on a year’s fieldwork in a Nahdawi community in the provincial city of Sousse, he argues that Islamist politicization during a transition dislocates the relationship between political ambitions and the religious social movement. He identifies three specific points of tension, over ideology, political strategy, and organization, which triggered sharp differences among al-Nahda activists. DR RORY MCCARTHY is a Fellow by Examination (Junior Research Fellow) in Oriental Studies at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he works on social movements, contentious politics, and Islamism in the Middle East and North Africa. He wrote his doctorate on the evolution of the Islamist movement Ennahda in one Tunisian city, and is n...

80 MIN2017 OCT 12
Comments
When Islamists Lose: The Politicization of Tunisia's al-Nahda

Women’s Political and Economic Empowerment in the MENA

Activists discuss how the pervasive issue of gender inequality manifests itself in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). This podcast was recorded in connection with a joint event organised by the British Council and the King's College London Department of Middle Eastern Studies on 7 March 2017, and is chaired by Gillian Cowell, Head of Gender and Inclusion at the British Council. It features Hajer Sharief (Co-founder, Together We Build It), Sussan Tahmasebi (Director of the MENA/Asia region program, ICAN) and Reem Wael (Gender Consultant)

32 MIN2017 MAR 14
Comments
Women’s Political and Economic Empowerment in the MENA

Understanding the Political Economy of Violence in the Middle East

A public lecture delivered by Dr Adeel Malik (University of Oxford) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London. This lecture seeks to develop a broader political economy narrative on violence in the Middle East. Using the recent ISIS-related violence in the Levant as a hook, I probe the deep political and economic factors underpinning violence in the region. Recent violence does not easily lend itself to empirical evidence. Beyond popular representations in the media, the social scientist has little knowledge of real actors on the ground, their control over means of violence and access to the supply chain of war. In light of this, I make four key propositions and situate them in the political economy analysis of violence. First, violence is not just a random or spontaneous generation: it is linked with the rational logic of power and formal state structures. Second, violence directly emerges from a power vacuum generated by ill-advised foreign interventions. ...

69 MIN2017 MAR 1
Comments
Understanding the Political Economy of Violence in the Middle East

Labour Mobilization in Egypt after the 25th January Revolution

A public lecture delivered by Christopher Barrie (University of Oxford) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London. Prevailing understandings of labour protest and strikes take as their focus stable democratic settings where autonomous trade union structures are an established component of the organizational resources available to workers. We extend the analysis of labour mobilization to a radically different context: Egypt in the year of the 25th January Revolution, when workers mobilized en masse in the absence of union leadership. For this, we use a catalogue of 4,912 protest events reported in Arabic-language newspapers. State-level signals of opportunity and aggregate shifts in economic conditions are poor predictors of labour activism in this context. Instead, local and national mobilization advancing both labour and non-labour demands is shown to inspire subsequent labour protest. These findings speak to the value of understanding labour protest and st...

61 MIN2017 FEB 8
Comments
Labour Mobilization in Egypt after the 25th January Revolution

Understanding Protest Environments beyond Opportunity and Threat

A public lecture delivered by Dr John Chalcraft (LSE) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London in February 2017. This lecture aims to develop conceptual understandings of the relationship between mobilization and the political environment. It presents an alternative to conventional social movement theorizing on political opportunity. A political extension of Gramsci’s writings on hegemony provides the conceptual framework. Research on movements in the Middle East and North Africa provide the main empirical base. Hegemonic incorporation is understood to be a process whereby established political institutions, procedures and norms win consent among the subordinated members of a given political community. This article identifies and elaborates five incorporation mechanisms: participation, delegation, legitimation, nesting, and co-optation. These mechanisms are enabling conditions for consent and contained contention; they drive forward hegemonic incorporation...

39 MIN2017 FEB 3
Comments
Understanding Protest Environments beyond Opportunity and Threat
the END

Latest Episodes

The Media, Politics And Dissent In North Africa Since The Arab Spring

This is a recording of the IMES Inaugural Conference titled 'The Media, Politics and Dissent in North Africa Since the Arab Spring' which took place on 25 September 2019. 00:00 Introductions: Fatima El-Issawi and Jonathan Hill 13:30 Panel #1: The media and authoritarian resilience Chair: Jonathan Hill Speakers: (1) Francesco Cavatorta; (2) Kjetil Selvick; (3) Hendrick Kraetzschmar. 1:23:45 Panel #2: The media and political accountability since the Arab Spring Chair: Dina Mattar Speakers: (1) Roxane Farmanfarmaian; (2) Boubaker Jamaei; (3) Fatima el-Issawi. 2:50:50 Panel #3: New medias, new dissent? Chair: Charis Boutieri Speakers: (1) Christina Moreno-Almeida; (2) Chaima Bouhel; (3) Omar Radi. 4:24:20 Closing address: Omar Belhouchet

347 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
The Media, Politics And Dissent In North Africa Since The Arab Spring

Law & Revolution: Legitimacy and Constitutionalism After the Arab Spring

A public lecture delivered by Dr Nimer Sultany (School of Law, SOAS) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London on 30 January 2018. What is the effect of revolutions on legal systems? What role do constitutions play in legitimating regimes? How do constitutions and revolutions converge or clash? This talk address these and other constitutional questions about the Arab Uprisings by drawing on the findings in the speaker's recently published book. The book, Law and Revolution: Legitimacy and Constitutionalism After the Arab Spring (Oxford University Press, 2017), urges a rethinking of major categories in political, legal, and constitutional theory in light of the Arab Spring. It offers a novel and comprehensive examination of the constitutional order that preceded and followed the Arab Spring in Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Morocco, Jordan, Algeria, Oman, and Bahrain. It also provides the first thorough discussion of the trials of former regime officials in Egypt and...

91 MIN2018 JAN 31
Comments
Law & Revolution: Legitimacy and Constitutionalism After the Arab Spring

Reflections on the Tunisian Revolution and its Aftermath

"Neoliberal Development, Protests and Mobilizations Between the Urban and Rural: Reflections on the Tunisian Revolution and its Aftermath" A public lecture delivered by Prof. Sami Zemni (Ghent University) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London on 7 November 2017. This presentation engages in the debate on urban contentious politics by returning to the Tunisian revolution. I reflect on how movements, provoked by neoliberal restructurings, emerged, and show how these ultimately came together to form a mass movement demanding radical political change. By analyzing the socio-spatial roots of the Tunisian revolution and by sketching the classes, social groups and movements that coalesced against authoritarian rule in early 2011, I will argue that new urban social movements have deployed new strategies of action, repertoires of contention, created new networks of solidarity and activism and how, in the end, new forms of collective mobilization and claim making ...

99 MIN2017 NOV 10
Comments
Reflections on the Tunisian Revolution and its Aftermath

When Islamists Lose: The Politicization of Tunisia's al-Nahda

In this talk delivered at King's on 10 October 2017, Dr Rory McCarthy (University of Oxford) asks how competitive electoral contests have transformed an Islamist movement by looking at the internal debates and struggles that have shaped Tunisia’s al-Nahda since 2011. Drawing on a year’s fieldwork in a Nahdawi community in the provincial city of Sousse, he argues that Islamist politicization during a transition dislocates the relationship between political ambitions and the religious social movement. He identifies three specific points of tension, over ideology, political strategy, and organization, which triggered sharp differences among al-Nahda activists. DR RORY MCCARTHY is a Fellow by Examination (Junior Research Fellow) in Oriental Studies at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he works on social movements, contentious politics, and Islamism in the Middle East and North Africa. He wrote his doctorate on the evolution of the Islamist movement Ennahda in one Tunisian city, and is n...

80 MIN2017 OCT 12
Comments
When Islamists Lose: The Politicization of Tunisia's al-Nahda

Women’s Political and Economic Empowerment in the MENA

Activists discuss how the pervasive issue of gender inequality manifests itself in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). This podcast was recorded in connection with a joint event organised by the British Council and the King's College London Department of Middle Eastern Studies on 7 March 2017, and is chaired by Gillian Cowell, Head of Gender and Inclusion at the British Council. It features Hajer Sharief (Co-founder, Together We Build It), Sussan Tahmasebi (Director of the MENA/Asia region program, ICAN) and Reem Wael (Gender Consultant)

32 MIN2017 MAR 14
Comments
Women’s Political and Economic Empowerment in the MENA

Understanding the Political Economy of Violence in the Middle East

A public lecture delivered by Dr Adeel Malik (University of Oxford) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London. This lecture seeks to develop a broader political economy narrative on violence in the Middle East. Using the recent ISIS-related violence in the Levant as a hook, I probe the deep political and economic factors underpinning violence in the region. Recent violence does not easily lend itself to empirical evidence. Beyond popular representations in the media, the social scientist has little knowledge of real actors on the ground, their control over means of violence and access to the supply chain of war. In light of this, I make four key propositions and situate them in the political economy analysis of violence. First, violence is not just a random or spontaneous generation: it is linked with the rational logic of power and formal state structures. Second, violence directly emerges from a power vacuum generated by ill-advised foreign interventions. ...

69 MIN2017 MAR 1
Comments
Understanding the Political Economy of Violence in the Middle East

Labour Mobilization in Egypt after the 25th January Revolution

A public lecture delivered by Christopher Barrie (University of Oxford) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London. Prevailing understandings of labour protest and strikes take as their focus stable democratic settings where autonomous trade union structures are an established component of the organizational resources available to workers. We extend the analysis of labour mobilization to a radically different context: Egypt in the year of the 25th January Revolution, when workers mobilized en masse in the absence of union leadership. For this, we use a catalogue of 4,912 protest events reported in Arabic-language newspapers. State-level signals of opportunity and aggregate shifts in economic conditions are poor predictors of labour activism in this context. Instead, local and national mobilization advancing both labour and non-labour demands is shown to inspire subsequent labour protest. These findings speak to the value of understanding labour protest and st...

61 MIN2017 FEB 8
Comments
Labour Mobilization in Egypt after the 25th January Revolution

Understanding Protest Environments beyond Opportunity and Threat

A public lecture delivered by Dr John Chalcraft (LSE) at the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King's College London in February 2017. This lecture aims to develop conceptual understandings of the relationship between mobilization and the political environment. It presents an alternative to conventional social movement theorizing on political opportunity. A political extension of Gramsci’s writings on hegemony provides the conceptual framework. Research on movements in the Middle East and North Africa provide the main empirical base. Hegemonic incorporation is understood to be a process whereby established political institutions, procedures and norms win consent among the subordinated members of a given political community. This article identifies and elaborates five incorporation mechanisms: participation, delegation, legitimation, nesting, and co-optation. These mechanisms are enabling conditions for consent and contained contention; they drive forward hegemonic incorporation...

39 MIN2017 FEB 3
Comments
Understanding Protest Environments beyond Opportunity and Threat
the END