title

Living on Earth

PRI/World Media Foundation

27
Followers
25
Plays
Living on Earth
Living on Earth

Living on Earth

PRI/World Media Foundation

27
Followers
25
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Living on Earth is a weekly news and information program from PRI about the world's changing environment, ecology, and human health. If there's something new about global warming, climate change, environmental politics or environmental quality and human health, you can count on Host Steve Curwood and the LOE public radio news team to keep you up to date with fair and accurate coverage.

Latest Episodes

The Border Wall and Wildlife, Coal Plant Ash Disaster for Workers, Andrew Yang's Climate Plan, and more

Coal Ash Cleanup Allegedly Deadly for Tennessee Workers / Andrew Yang's Climate Plan / Beyond the Headlines / Pronghorn Antelope / How the Border Wall Could Harm Wildlife Dozens of workers who helped clean up a 2008 coal ash spill in Tennessee have died and hundreds more fallen ill from diseases linked to the disaster. Now a fight for justice for these workers has won a round in the courts. Also, how President Trump's border wall could sever habitats and migratory paths for wildlife in the borderlands, including birds. And Democratic Presidential candidate Andrew Yang says his proposed "Freedom Dividend" of a thousand dollars a month to every American over 18 could help kickstart the fight against climate change. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MIN1 days ago
Comments
The Border Wall and Wildlife, Coal Plant Ash Disaster for Workers, Andrew Yang's Climate Plan, and more

Climate Crisis Town Hall, The Amazon's Tipping Point, Underland: A Deep Time Journey, and more

Amazon Tipping Point / Democratic Candidates Talk Solutions at Climate Town Hall / Reviewing the Climate Crisis Town Hall / Beyond The Headlines / Underland: A Deep Time Journey The fires in the Amazon rainforest are illuminating the alarming speed of deforestation in one of the most biodiverse places on Earth - and bringing it closer to a "tipping point" transition into dry savannah. Also, Democratic presidential hopefuls spell out their plans to address the climate emergency at town halls hosted by CNN, and a Harvard economist reviews their schemes. And author Robert Macfarlane ventures into ice caves, braves underwater rivers, and crawls through catacombs to discover the "deep time" running beneath our feet. Those stories and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Climate Crisis Town Hall, The Amazon's Tipping Point, Underland: A Deep Time Journey, and more

Gaza Water Crisis, Saltwater Beavers Promote Estuary Health, Everglades National Park: a “River of Grass”, and more

Saltwater Beavers Bring Life Back to Estuaries / Everglades National Park, a "River of Grass" / Drilling in the Everglades / Fly-fishing Saved From Pollution / Gaza Water Crisis In the Gaza Strip, where every three out of four people are refugees, clean water is scarce and there's a worsening health crisis for Gaza's children. Also, it turns out that beavers, a keystone species in some freshwater ecosystems, could hold the key to help restore degraded coastal habitats, too. And Everglades National Park provides a place of sanctuary in nature for those looking for peace and quiet, as well as a front-row-seat view of wildlife like alligators. The "River of Grass" and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Gaza Water Crisis, Saltwater Beavers Promote Estuary Health, Everglades National Park: a “River of Grass”, and more

Farming While Black, Toxic Diapers and Sanitary Pads, A Steamy Date for 'Romeo and Juliet' Frogs, and more

Toxicants in Diapers and Sanitary Pads / 'Romeo and Juliet' Frogs' First Steamy Date / Exploring The Parks: North Cascades National Park / Refugees Cultivate Healing Through Gardening / Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm's Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land A recent study finds that single-use diapers and sanitary pads contain phthalates and volatile organic compounds, chemicals that are known to cause a variety of health complications including birth defects and endocrine disruption. Also, meet the farmers who are working to cultivate justice and root out racism, by reconnecting people of color to the earth. And Sehuencas water frogs, like other amphibians, have been devastated by the chytrid fungus, and a frog that scientists named "Romeo" was the last known frog of his kind and had stopped singing for a mate. But recently scientists discovered "Juliet" hiding in the Bolivian cloud forest, and now Romeo's song is back. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Farming While Black, Toxic Diapers and Sanitary Pads, A Steamy Date for 'Romeo and Juliet' Frogs, and more

Re-wilding the English Countryside, Climate Migrant Caravans, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and more

Climate Migrant Caravans / The Place Where You Live: Anchorage, Alaska / Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon / Confronting Climate Change Through Sound / Rewilding The English Countryside The recent waves of migrant caravans coming from Central America have a link to climate change: many of the migrants are fleeing their homes in the wake of crop failures, the result of a massive drought that has lasted for five years. Also, the constant onslaught of grim statistics about climate change may cause some people to shut down. Eco-acoustics could hold the key to drawing people back into a conversation about our changing climate. And an experiment in "re-wilding" a farm in England brings ecological and financial benefits from sustainable hunting and ecotourism. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINAUG 17
Comments
Re-wilding the English Countryside, Climate Migrant Caravans, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and more

No-Show Green Voters, Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands, Desegregating America's Shoreline, and more

No-Show Green Voters / Exploring the Parks: Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands / BirdNote: Ponderosa Pine Savanna / Fighting Climate Change, Naturally / Free the Beaches: Desegregating America's Shoreline In the United States, approximately 20 million registered voters list the environment as one of their top two priorities. But these "super-environmentalists" tend to stay home on Election Day. Also, Arizona's Sky Islands are home to heat and cactus, but also many species that you're more likely to find far north of the desert Southwest - and even considerable snow. And the US civil rights movement to end racial segregation in the 1960's was fought in the North as well as the South. In Connecticut, just about all of the Long Island Sound beaches were off-limits to people of color, until creative organizing finally secured access for all children. That and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINAUG 10
Comments
No-Show Green Voters, Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands, Desegregating America's Shoreline, and more

An Afternoon with Pete Seeger, Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak, Vegan Generation Gap, and more

Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve / BirdNote: Exquisite Thrush Song / Vegan Generation Gap / An Afternoon with Pete Seeger Folk music legend Pete Seeger was renowned for his combination of music and social activism. A year before the first Earth Day, Mr. Seeger and friends built a sloop he christened the Clearwater, because that was his intention: to clear the waters of the Hudson River of pollution and garbage. Also, as part of Living on Earth's series exploring America's public lands, we travel to Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, deep in the remote Alaskan wilderness. And traditional family recipes that go back through the generations can present challenges when members of the newest generation go vegan. Those stories and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINAUG 3
Comments
An Afternoon with Pete Seeger, Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak, Vegan Generation Gap, and more

Miners Pollute the Sea of Cortez, Raising Monarch Butterflies, Guinea Fowl and Tick Control, and more

Miners Pollute the Sea of Cortez / Beyond the Headlines / How to Raise Monarchs / Taggers at Work / Monarch Migration / The Value of Summer Camp / Guinea Fowl and Tick Control / BirdNote: Do Birds Use Ants as Tools? Mining company Grupo Mexico has spilled millions of gallons of toxic mining chemicals and waste into the Sea of Cortez and rivers that feed into it, endangering people and the natural ecosystem. Now locals are demanding justice in the wake of the latest disaster. Also, some people have fond childhood memories of raising monarch caterpillars in classrooms and at home. We've got some tips for ensuring monarch butterflies raised in captivity aren't led astray in their migration. And deer ticks can carry Lyme disease, which is moving North, thanks to climate change. Now some homeowners in the thick of tick country are turning to an unusual tick control method: keeping a flock of guinea fowl. Tick-eating machines and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINJUL 27
Comments
Miners Pollute the Sea of Cortez, Raising Monarch Butterflies, Guinea Fowl and Tick Control, and more

Fracking and Your Health, Offsetting Your Carbon Footprint, "Hadestown" Sings of Climate Disruption, and more

Fracking and Your Health / Beyond the Headlines / Exploring the Parks: Petrified Forest National Park / Offsetting Your Carbon Footprint / "Hadestown" Brings Climate Change To Broadway / Camels at the Henbury Craters / BirdNote: House Sparrows' Dance In this episode, fracking is a highly efficient method for extracting oil and gas locked up in shale rock, but it comes with environmental and health risks including birth defects, cancer, and asthma. A meta study lays out the evidence from more than 1700 studies, articles and reports. Also, carbon-intensive activities like global air travel have been growing for decades. For those interested in reducing their carbon footprints, carbon offsets promise to mitigate the damage caused by flying and other emissions sources. And Tony Award-winning musical "Hadestown" infuses themes like isolationism, exploitation of workers, and even climate change with New Orleans jazz, folk, and pop music. All that and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINJUL 20
Comments
Fracking and Your Health, Offsetting Your Carbon Footprint, "Hadestown" Sings of Climate Disruption, and more

"#MeToo” At Nature Conservancy, The Secret and Endangered Lives of Freshwater Mussels, Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and more

"#MeToo" at the Nature Conservancy / Beyond the Headlines / How To Be A Good Creature / The Secret & Endangered Lives of Freshwater Mussels / Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon In this episode of Living on Earth, with $6 billion in assets The Nature Conservancy is among the world's richest environmental nonprofits and since 1950 it has protected 120 million acres worldwide. But a recent sexual harassment, gender discrimination and workplace misconduct scandal has shaken trust in the organization. Also, with names like "spectaclecase", "snuffbox", and "orangefoot pimpleback pearly", freshwater mussels are among Earth's most fascinating and underappreciated species. They're also among the most endangered organisms in the United States. Recently, critical habitat was finally designated for four species of freshwater mussels, but much more must be done to save hundreds more from extinction. And in the latest from our occasional series on America's public lands, we travel to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in California, which boast some of the biggest trees in the world and the tallest peak in the contiguous United States along with hundreds of miles of hiking trails. Exploring the parks and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINJUL 13
Comments
"#MeToo” At Nature Conservancy, The Secret and Endangered Lives of Freshwater Mussels, Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and more

Latest Episodes

The Border Wall and Wildlife, Coal Plant Ash Disaster for Workers, Andrew Yang's Climate Plan, and more

Coal Ash Cleanup Allegedly Deadly for Tennessee Workers / Andrew Yang's Climate Plan / Beyond the Headlines / Pronghorn Antelope / How the Border Wall Could Harm Wildlife Dozens of workers who helped clean up a 2008 coal ash spill in Tennessee have died and hundreds more fallen ill from diseases linked to the disaster. Now a fight for justice for these workers has won a round in the courts. Also, how President Trump's border wall could sever habitats and migratory paths for wildlife in the borderlands, including birds. And Democratic Presidential candidate Andrew Yang says his proposed "Freedom Dividend" of a thousand dollars a month to every American over 18 could help kickstart the fight against climate change. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MIN1 days ago
Comments
The Border Wall and Wildlife, Coal Plant Ash Disaster for Workers, Andrew Yang's Climate Plan, and more

Climate Crisis Town Hall, The Amazon's Tipping Point, Underland: A Deep Time Journey, and more

Amazon Tipping Point / Democratic Candidates Talk Solutions at Climate Town Hall / Reviewing the Climate Crisis Town Hall / Beyond The Headlines / Underland: A Deep Time Journey The fires in the Amazon rainforest are illuminating the alarming speed of deforestation in one of the most biodiverse places on Earth - and bringing it closer to a "tipping point" transition into dry savannah. Also, Democratic presidential hopefuls spell out their plans to address the climate emergency at town halls hosted by CNN, and a Harvard economist reviews their schemes. And author Robert Macfarlane ventures into ice caves, braves underwater rivers, and crawls through catacombs to discover the "deep time" running beneath our feet. Those stories and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Climate Crisis Town Hall, The Amazon's Tipping Point, Underland: A Deep Time Journey, and more

Gaza Water Crisis, Saltwater Beavers Promote Estuary Health, Everglades National Park: a “River of Grass”, and more

Saltwater Beavers Bring Life Back to Estuaries / Everglades National Park, a "River of Grass" / Drilling in the Everglades / Fly-fishing Saved From Pollution / Gaza Water Crisis In the Gaza Strip, where every three out of four people are refugees, clean water is scarce and there's a worsening health crisis for Gaza's children. Also, it turns out that beavers, a keystone species in some freshwater ecosystems, could hold the key to help restore degraded coastal habitats, too. And Everglades National Park provides a place of sanctuary in nature for those looking for peace and quiet, as well as a front-row-seat view of wildlife like alligators. The "River of Grass" and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Gaza Water Crisis, Saltwater Beavers Promote Estuary Health, Everglades National Park: a “River of Grass”, and more

Farming While Black, Toxic Diapers and Sanitary Pads, A Steamy Date for 'Romeo and Juliet' Frogs, and more

Toxicants in Diapers and Sanitary Pads / 'Romeo and Juliet' Frogs' First Steamy Date / Exploring The Parks: North Cascades National Park / Refugees Cultivate Healing Through Gardening / Farming While Black: Soul Fire Farm's Practical Guide to Liberation on the Land A recent study finds that single-use diapers and sanitary pads contain phthalates and volatile organic compounds, chemicals that are known to cause a variety of health complications including birth defects and endocrine disruption. Also, meet the farmers who are working to cultivate justice and root out racism, by reconnecting people of color to the earth. And Sehuencas water frogs, like other amphibians, have been devastated by the chytrid fungus, and a frog that scientists named "Romeo" was the last known frog of his kind and had stopped singing for a mate. But recently scientists discovered "Juliet" hiding in the Bolivian cloud forest, and now Romeo's song is back. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Farming While Black, Toxic Diapers and Sanitary Pads, A Steamy Date for 'Romeo and Juliet' Frogs, and more

Re-wilding the English Countryside, Climate Migrant Caravans, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and more

Climate Migrant Caravans / The Place Where You Live: Anchorage, Alaska / Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon / Confronting Climate Change Through Sound / Rewilding The English Countryside The recent waves of migrant caravans coming from Central America have a link to climate change: many of the migrants are fleeing their homes in the wake of crop failures, the result of a massive drought that has lasted for five years. Also, the constant onslaught of grim statistics about climate change may cause some people to shut down. Eco-acoustics could hold the key to drawing people back into a conversation about our changing climate. And an experiment in "re-wilding" a farm in England brings ecological and financial benefits from sustainable hunting and ecotourism. All that and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINAUG 17
Comments
Re-wilding the English Countryside, Climate Migrant Caravans, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and more

No-Show Green Voters, Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands, Desegregating America's Shoreline, and more

No-Show Green Voters / Exploring the Parks: Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands / BirdNote: Ponderosa Pine Savanna / Fighting Climate Change, Naturally / Free the Beaches: Desegregating America's Shoreline In the United States, approximately 20 million registered voters list the environment as one of their top two priorities. But these "super-environmentalists" tend to stay home on Election Day. Also, Arizona's Sky Islands are home to heat and cactus, but also many species that you're more likely to find far north of the desert Southwest - and even considerable snow. And the US civil rights movement to end racial segregation in the 1960's was fought in the North as well as the South. In Connecticut, just about all of the Long Island Sound beaches were off-limits to people of color, until creative organizing finally secured access for all children. That and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINAUG 10
Comments
No-Show Green Voters, Cactus and Snow in the Desert Sky Islands, Desegregating America's Shoreline, and more

An Afternoon with Pete Seeger, Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak, Vegan Generation Gap, and more

Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve / BirdNote: Exquisite Thrush Song / Vegan Generation Gap / An Afternoon with Pete Seeger Folk music legend Pete Seeger was renowned for his combination of music and social activism. A year before the first Earth Day, Mr. Seeger and friends built a sloop he christened the Clearwater, because that was his intention: to clear the waters of the Hudson River of pollution and garbage. Also, as part of Living on Earth's series exploring America's public lands, we travel to Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, deep in the remote Alaskan wilderness. And traditional family recipes that go back through the generations can present challenges when members of the newest generation go vegan. Those stories and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINAUG 3
Comments
An Afternoon with Pete Seeger, Exploring the Parks: Aniakchak, Vegan Generation Gap, and more

Miners Pollute the Sea of Cortez, Raising Monarch Butterflies, Guinea Fowl and Tick Control, and more

Miners Pollute the Sea of Cortez / Beyond the Headlines / How to Raise Monarchs / Taggers at Work / Monarch Migration / The Value of Summer Camp / Guinea Fowl and Tick Control / BirdNote: Do Birds Use Ants as Tools? Mining company Grupo Mexico has spilled millions of gallons of toxic mining chemicals and waste into the Sea of Cortez and rivers that feed into it, endangering people and the natural ecosystem. Now locals are demanding justice in the wake of the latest disaster. Also, some people have fond childhood memories of raising monarch caterpillars in classrooms and at home. We've got some tips for ensuring monarch butterflies raised in captivity aren't led astray in their migration. And deer ticks can carry Lyme disease, which is moving North, thanks to climate change. Now some homeowners in the thick of tick country are turning to an unusual tick control method: keeping a flock of guinea fowl. Tick-eating machines and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINJUL 27
Comments
Miners Pollute the Sea of Cortez, Raising Monarch Butterflies, Guinea Fowl and Tick Control, and more

Fracking and Your Health, Offsetting Your Carbon Footprint, "Hadestown" Sings of Climate Disruption, and more

Fracking and Your Health / Beyond the Headlines / Exploring the Parks: Petrified Forest National Park / Offsetting Your Carbon Footprint / "Hadestown" Brings Climate Change To Broadway / Camels at the Henbury Craters / BirdNote: House Sparrows' Dance In this episode, fracking is a highly efficient method for extracting oil and gas locked up in shale rock, but it comes with environmental and health risks including birth defects, cancer, and asthma. A meta study lays out the evidence from more than 1700 studies, articles and reports. Also, carbon-intensive activities like global air travel have been growing for decades. For those interested in reducing their carbon footprints, carbon offsets promise to mitigate the damage caused by flying and other emissions sources. And Tony Award-winning musical "Hadestown" infuses themes like isolationism, exploitation of workers, and even climate change with New Orleans jazz, folk, and pop music. All that and more, this week on Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINJUL 20
Comments
Fracking and Your Health, Offsetting Your Carbon Footprint, "Hadestown" Sings of Climate Disruption, and more

"#MeToo” At Nature Conservancy, The Secret and Endangered Lives of Freshwater Mussels, Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and more

"#MeToo" at the Nature Conservancy / Beyond the Headlines / How To Be A Good Creature / The Secret & Endangered Lives of Freshwater Mussels / Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon In this episode of Living on Earth, with $6 billion in assets The Nature Conservancy is among the world's richest environmental nonprofits and since 1950 it has protected 120 million acres worldwide. But a recent sexual harassment, gender discrimination and workplace misconduct scandal has shaken trust in the organization. Also, with names like "spectaclecase", "snuffbox", and "orangefoot pimpleback pearly", freshwater mussels are among Earth's most fascinating and underappreciated species. They're also among the most endangered organisms in the United States. Recently, critical habitat was finally designated for four species of freshwater mussels, but much more must be done to save hundreds more from extinction. And in the latest from our occasional series on America's public lands, we travel to Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks in California, which boast some of the biggest trees in the world and the tallest peak in the contiguous United States along with hundreds of miles of hiking trails. Exploring the parks and more, in this episode of Living on Earth from PRI.

51 MINJUL 13
Comments
"#MeToo” At Nature Conservancy, The Secret and Endangered Lives of Freshwater Mussels, Exploring the Parks: Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and more

Listen Now On Himalaya