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Spectrum

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Spectrum
Spectrum

Spectrum

WOUB Public Media

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Followers
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Plays
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Spectrum features conversations with an eclectic group of fascinating people, some are famous and some are not, but they all have captivating stories.

Latest Episodes

Investigative Reporter Explains How She Covers Trauma and Trauma Victims

Since 2002, Rachel Dissell has been a reporter for the Cleveland Plain Dealer. During her 17 years at the newspaper, she has covered trauma and trauma victims and one major tragedy after another. Her career has focused on complex and emotionally draining issues such as the impact of violence on women and children, life-changing environmental topics, corruption and several instances of social injustice. Her reporting has instigated major policy changes, new governmental procedures, and legislation to protect the citizenry. Covering trauma victims and tragedies call for several special reporting techniques, according to Dissell. It often takes a special cautious approach and patience on the part of the reporter to get victims to tell their stories completely and thoroughly, she notes. A reporter often must approach a victim with caution not to scare them or push them into isolation, Dissell adds. She also notes that burn-out is a major factor facing reporters who spend their careers covering human tragedies. She discusses ways that she regains her perspective and her equilibrium after immersing herself in stories of violence and human turmoil. Dissell is a Dart Fellow at the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma at the Columbia Journalism School and she also has been a Health Journalism Fellow at Annenberg School of Journalism at the University of Southern California. Besides her full-time reporting, Dissell serves as an adjunct journalism professor at Kent State University, her alma mater.

43 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Investigative Reporter Explains How She Covers Trauma and Trauma Victims

Foreign Correspondents Have Played Critical Roles in American Journalism

The concept of using foreign correspondents housed in other countries to help inform the American public of the news is a concept that goes back to Colonial days. Yet today, news organizations have drastically cut back on full-time correspondents abroad opting instead for a smaller reporting corps and the use of free-lancers and citizen journalists. So says long-time journalists and authors John Maxwell Hamilton and Peter Copeland as they discussed the history, present and future of using foreign correspondents to report news to America. Hamilton claims that Colonists re-published the news from newspapers abroad that arrived in the Colonies on ships. He says that the interest in the American public, at that time, was high to learn of news from the homelands of immigrants. Foreign correspondents also were used to convey news in the 19th Century and on through the 20th Century, according to Hamilton. He believes, however, that the pinnacle of the status of the foreign correspondent was between World War I and World War II. Copeland states unfortunately that news organizations started cutting foreign correspondent staffs as a cost cutting measure at the end of the 20th Century and the beginning of the 21st Century. He notes that now news organizations are relying more and more on freelance correspondents or citizen reporting through smart phones. He notes that it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to check the accuracy of the some citizen reporting from world hotspots, thereby making accurate reporting difficult, at times. Hamilton is the Hopkins P. Breazeale Professor in Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Journalism and a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, in Washington, D.C. He also was the founding dean of the Manship School and served as executive vice chancellor and provost at LSU. His most recent book is “Journalism’s Roving Eye” that won the Goldsmith Prize. Copeland has been a reporter for four decades and has covered everything from local crime stories to foreign news as a correspondent. He most recently was the editor and general manager of the Scripps Howard News Service in Washington, D.C. His latest book has just been released. It is “Finding the News: Adventures of a Young Reporter.” It is a recount of part of Copeland’s career but it also offers advice for aspiring young journalists.

47 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Foreign Correspondents Have Played Critical Roles in American Journalism

Reporter Tania Rashid: Covering Human Tragedies Takes Toll on Journalists

Freelance journalist Tania Rashid says covering human tragedies can take a psychological toll on reporters who face human misery day-after-day. She says it is immensely distressing to see people suffering, through no fault of their own, simply because of their race or ethnicity. Rashid has spent a great amount of time covering the Rohingya refugee crisis as the Rohingya people flee Myanmar into Bangladesh to form the world’s largest refugee camp. Her reporting of the trials, tribulations and turmoils of the refugees has led to stories about terrible living conditions, lack of food, rape, abuse and sex trafficking. She even went undercover to report how Rohingya young girls are recruited to work in brothels. Rashid also reported on how 12 and 13 year old girls are being forced into marriages with strangers they don’t even know. Rashid says that witnessing such immense human tragedy forces her, as a reporter, to sometimes reach out with help for the subjects of her stories. She cannot just remain a passive observer. She also says that covering these types of stories of human carnage and degradation forces her constantly to examine her journalistic ethics. She is acutely aware sometimes of protecting the identity of her sources to prevent them from suffering further abuse because of talking with a reporter. Rashid becomes infuriated with journalism colleagues who do not protect victims that they report about and sometimes cavalierly disclose names and faces of those who may suffer more abuse for telling their stories. Rashid’s work has been seen on the PBS News Hour, CNN International, Vice News and on Al Jazeera. She has an undergraduate degree in history and global studies from UCLA and a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University. You can review Rashid’s work at her website: http://taniarashid.com/

40 MINOCT 30
Comments
Reporter Tania Rashid: Covering Human Tragedies Takes Toll on Journalists

Analyst Examines Impeachment Inquiry Poll Results on 2020 Presidential Race

Author and election analyst Kyle Kondik, from the University of Virginia Center for Politics, says the latest poll results are tipping toward favoring impeachment because voters can more easily grasp the issues comprising the Ukrainian controversy. The elements surrounding President Trump asking Ukrainian officials to provide political dirt on his potential Democratic opponent Joe Biden are much easier for voters to understand than the muddled and legalistic report from Special Counsel Robert Mueller, Kondik says. Therefore, recent polls are showing over 50 percent of Americans favoring both impeachment of the President and removal from office by the U.S. Senate. However, Kondik cautions that these early polls are volatile and can easily change. At this point, Kondik does not think there will be sufficient cross-over Republican voting in the Senate to remove Trump from office. Instead, he believes that Trump will be impeached by the Democratic House but not removed from office by the Republican Senate. Two other Presidents have had similar fates…Bill Clinton and Andrew Johnson. Richard Nixon resigned the Presidency before being officially impeached. Kondik also says that voter reaction to the impeachment process is especially important in key states like Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Ohio – where the Trump campaign has been focusing a great amount of time and resources. Although Ohio has turned more and more Republican in recent elections, Kondik still predicts that Ohio will be a bellwether state for 2020. He believes it is volatile depending on the public’s reaction to President Trump as the election nears. In 2016, Kondik authored “The Bellwether: Why Ohio Picks the President” – published by the Ohio University Press.

39 MINOCT 16
Comments
Analyst Examines Impeachment Inquiry Poll Results on 2020 Presidential Race

Trump’s Syrian Policy Fosters Chaos & Supports ISIS Resurgence Expert Says

President Donald Trump’s newly announced withdrawal of American troops from Northeastern Syria opens the door for Turkey to attack America’s Kurdish allies in the region, says Dr. Nukhet Sandal, Chair of the Political Science Department at Ohio University. The potential of Turkey attacking an unprotected U.S. ally is dangerous at many levels, according to Dr. Sandal. Primarily it sends a message to other U.S. allies that we will not stand behind them during times of international upheaval. We will not protect them, she says. It makes America untrustworthy in her view. Dr. Sandal also believes that this abandonment of the Kurds invites further meddling in this region by Turkey, Iran, and Russia. Most importantly, she notes that currently, the Kurds have about 10,000 ISIS prisoners in their custody and about 70,000 ISIS family members. The Kurds have said that if they are fighting the Turks that they will not be able to appropriately guard these prisoners and their release or escape could be imminent. Trump has said that the U.S. and its allies have totally defeated ISIS and destroyed the caliphate. However, Dr. Sandal says that ISIS can easily become reconstituted perhaps even under a different name and become a huge threat to the United States very quickly, given Trump’s decision to abandon the Kurds and this region of the Middle East. Dr. Sandal has both Turkish and Kurdish heritage. She is an award-winning teacher and researcher. She received her doctorate degree from the University of Southern California and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Watson Institute of International Studies at Brown University. She is the author of numerous academic articles for prestige journals and has written two books about religion, conflict and international relations. She also has been featured by media outlets such as the BBC, the Washington Post and the Huffington Post.

35 MINOCT 9
Comments
Trump’s Syrian Policy Fosters Chaos & Supports ISIS Resurgence Expert Says

Chris Thile Highlights the Creative Process behind His Work on “Live from Here”

Chris Thile is an acclaimed musician and songwriter, as well as the host of American Public Media’s nationally syndicated live, weekly variety show “Live From Here.” WOUB’s Emily Votaw speaks with Thile about the creative process behind his work for “Live From Here”, what it’s like to host a live radio show in 2019, and what he enjoys about performing on college campuses. Besides being a solo artist, Thile was one of the co-founders of the Grammy-winning acoustic trio, Nickel Creek, and is a member of the bluegrass group “Punch Brothers.” In 2012, Thile was a McArthur Fellow. Emily Votaw is the Culture Editor at WOUB Public Media and an occasional guest host on WOUB’s Spectrum Podcast.

10 MINOCT 4
Comments
Chris Thile Highlights the Creative Process behind His Work on “Live from Here”

College/University Enrollments Go Down as Potential Students Question Value

College and university student enrollments are in a downward spiral because of multiple factors including parents and students questioning the value of a college education, according to Dr. Richard Vedder, author, historian, columnist, and emeritus professor of economics at Ohio University. Demographically, there is a decline in the number of traditional college eligible students born during a period of low fertility in America and the numbers are expected to get worse. The number of traditional 18-22 year old students will drop more than 15% between 2025 and 2029. Currently, we are in our seventh straight year of decline nationally. Not only are there fewer students but students and parents are now questioning the value of higher education compared to the costs involved. Dr. Vedder says there is a “flight to quality” – students want to get in the elite institutions of higher learning but if they can’t many do not see a lesser ranked college or university as a viable alternative. Students look at the high costs of education, mounting student debt and balance that against the fact that 41.4 percent of college graduates are underemployed, according to Dr. Vedder. College educated students are now doing jobs that were formerly done by those with lesser education and the earnings differential between college and high school graduates is now declining, Dr. Vedder adds. In short, there are too many college graduates for the number of professional, managerial and technical jobs available. Colleges and university who are most dependent on tuition as revenue will be hurt the worst by enrollment declines and Dr. Vedder says experts are noting that many universities will either close their doors or merge with other institutions over the next two decades. He notes that universities have high labor costs and high fixed costs and those costs need to be met by enrollment driven tuitions and other fees. But, if students are not present more and more colleges and universities will find themselves in financial binds. Some educators worry that colleges and universities have been too slow to recognize these trends and are lagging behind in innovations to increase the value of degrees. Dr. Vedder is also a senior fellow at The Independent Institute and was a founding director of the Center for College Affordability and Productivity in Washington, D.C.

43 MINSEP 11
Comments
College/University Enrollments Go Down as Potential Students Question Value

Chagas Disease Is Being Battled By Ohio University Researchers and Students

Ohio University researchers and students are fighting to prevent the dreaded Chagas disease in Ecuador and its spread to the United States. Each year, according to the World Health Organization, over 8 million people are infected with Chagas disease mostly in Latin America. However, nearly 300,000 people in the United States are also infected. The disease kills nearly 20,000 people each year. Additionally, some 15,000 babies are born infected with the disease. Chagas disease is spread by a parasite called the “kissing bug” and it is prevalent in southern Ecuador. It thrives in rural and overcrowded urban centers, according to Dr. Mario Grijalva, the director of the Infectious and Tropical Disease Institute at Ohio University. To prevent the spread of the disease, new housing units must be built for families to safely occupy. These units are free of the “kissing bugs.” Dr. Grijalva’s Institute has partnered with various academic units at Ohio University to raise awareness of Chagas disease and to help raise money to build the new homes. To date, seven homes have been built and plans are to build 60 more over the next two years. When this project is completed in 2021, enough data will be available to demonstrate whether new housing can act as a viable preventative tactic against this deadly disease. Multiple colleges and departments of Ohio University are involved in this project of engaged research and service learning. For example, the Scripps College of Communication is providing marketing materials and helping to design a crowd-funding campaign, according to Dean Dr. Scott Titsworth. Ohio University also is working with the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador (PUCE). Dr. Titsworth says that this partnership is a perfect example of community engagement on the part of both faculty and students. The work in Ecuador expands students’ world view and provides a real world laboratory for their communication skills, according to Titsworth. You can read more about this multi-disciplinary effort and how to donate to the cause at the following website. https://www.h3living.org/

43 MINSEP 4
Comments
Chagas Disease Is Being Battled By Ohio University Researchers and Students

Science Journalism Is Important to Understanding Emerging Technologies

Amy Nordrum, a veteran science journalist, feels that fact-based science reporting helps an audience navigate through new technologies and new discoveries that will impact people’s daily lives. Nordrum currently is news editor of “IEEE Spectrum,” an award-winning technology and engineering magazine based in New York City. She also is a frequent guest on Public Radio’s “Science Friday” with Ira Flatow talking about a wide-range of science topics. Nordrum writes and edits news stories about computing, artificial intelligence, power and energy, biomedical engineering, and telecommunications. Her favorite stories cover elements of business and technology and explain the importance of technology to the average person. She says she really enjoys her guest appearances on Science Friday. She tells us how the appearances are scheduled and how she prepares for the show. Over her journalism career, Nordrum has done a wide range of science reporting. She has written about health care, biotech, and pharmaceuticals for the “International Business Times,” based in New York City before joining IEEE Spectrum. Nordrum earned her master’s degree in science journalism from New York University and her bachelor’s degree in journalism from Ohio University. She recently appeared at Ohio University to talk about ethics in science journalism. Nordrum is currently completing an MBA with a focus on media management at New York University’s Stern School of Business.

36 MINJUN 26
Comments
Science Journalism Is Important to Understanding Emerging Technologies

Midwest TV/Media Critic has Rich Career Despite His Heartland Location

Most entertainment news is generated on the east or west coasts and not in the heartland. Yet, John Kiesewetter spent 40 professional years at the “Cincinnati Enquirer” and three decades as its “Television Critic” writing everything from local criticism to major features. After his job was eliminated at the Enquirer, his career continues to this day. He is now the TV/Media reporter for Cincinnati Public Radio, WVXU FM and wvxu.org. There he writes an almost daily blog, and contributes on-air interviews to various locally generated radio programs. “I had a great run when newspapers were great, when papers had big features staffs and money to travel,” Kiesewetter says. Travel allowed him access to major celebrities and the latest in entertainment news. But, Kiesewetter doesn’t want just any story. Instead, he focuses on stories he thinks are important to the average listener and reader. That philosophy has served him well. He tells us how he traveled to meet stars as well as talking with celebrities who came through Cincinnati. He has talked with classic comic performers like Lucille Ball, Bob Newhart, Bob Hope, Stan Freberg, Sid Caesar, Carl Reiner, Steve Allen, Red Skelton, Don Knotts, Andy Griffith and Bill Cosby. He also focused on celebrities with local Southwest Ohio backgrounds such as: George Clooney, Woody Harrelson, Martin Sheen, Rob Lowe, Allison Janney, Johnathan Winters, David Letterman and sports commentator Dan Patrick. The list of stars he has interviewed is endless and his stories are captivating. In addition to covering the typical entertainment fare, Kiesewetter started critiquing local newscasts and anchors and he has a passion for sports commentators and play-by-play people such as Red Barber, Bob Costas, Al Michaels, Chris Collinsworth, Pete Rose, Joe Nuxhall and Marty Brennamen. He is currently writing a book about the life of former Cincinnati Reds pitcher and long-time broadcaster Joe Nuxhall. “I think part of my success as a TV/Media writer is my solid news training, so I could cover a breaking story, see a trend story, and write a news personality profile, either on a local or a national level,” Kiesewetter adds. “I wasn’t a real flashy writer, but I was informative as hell.”

49 MINJUN 19
Comments
Midwest TV/Media Critic has Rich Career Despite His Heartland Location

Latest Episodes

Investigative Reporter Explains How She Covers Trauma and Trauma Victims

Since 2002, Rachel Dissell has been a reporter for the Cleveland Plain Dealer. During her 17 years at the newspaper, she has covered trauma and trauma victims and one major tragedy after another. Her career has focused on complex and emotionally draining issues such as the impact of violence on women and children, life-changing environmental topics, corruption and several instances of social injustice. Her reporting has instigated major policy changes, new governmental procedures, and legislation to protect the citizenry. Covering trauma victims and tragedies call for several special reporting techniques, according to Dissell. It often takes a special cautious approach and patience on the part of the reporter to get victims to tell their stories completely and thoroughly, she notes. A reporter often must approach a victim with caution not to scare them or push them into isolation, Dissell adds. She also notes that burn-out is a major factor facing reporters who spend their careers covering human tragedies. She discusses ways that she regains her perspective and her equilibrium after immersing herself in stories of violence and human turmoil. Dissell is a Dart Fellow at the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma at the Columbia Journalism School and she also has been a Health Journalism Fellow at Annenberg School of Journalism at the University of Southern California. Besides her full-time reporting, Dissell serves as an adjunct journalism professor at Kent State University, her alma mater.

43 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Investigative Reporter Explains How She Covers Trauma and Trauma Victims

Foreign Correspondents Have Played Critical Roles in American Journalism

The concept of using foreign correspondents housed in other countries to help inform the American public of the news is a concept that goes back to Colonial days. Yet today, news organizations have drastically cut back on full-time correspondents abroad opting instead for a smaller reporting corps and the use of free-lancers and citizen journalists. So says long-time journalists and authors John Maxwell Hamilton and Peter Copeland as they discussed the history, present and future of using foreign correspondents to report news to America. Hamilton claims that Colonists re-published the news from newspapers abroad that arrived in the Colonies on ships. He says that the interest in the American public, at that time, was high to learn of news from the homelands of immigrants. Foreign correspondents also were used to convey news in the 19th Century and on through the 20th Century, according to Hamilton. He believes, however, that the pinnacle of the status of the foreign correspondent was between World War I and World War II. Copeland states unfortunately that news organizations started cutting foreign correspondent staffs as a cost cutting measure at the end of the 20th Century and the beginning of the 21st Century. He notes that now news organizations are relying more and more on freelance correspondents or citizen reporting through smart phones. He notes that it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to check the accuracy of the some citizen reporting from world hotspots, thereby making accurate reporting difficult, at times. Hamilton is the Hopkins P. Breazeale Professor in Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Journalism and a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center, in Washington, D.C. He also was the founding dean of the Manship School and served as executive vice chancellor and provost at LSU. His most recent book is “Journalism’s Roving Eye” that won the Goldsmith Prize. Copeland has been a reporter for four decades and has covered everything from local crime stories to foreign news as a correspondent. He most recently was the editor and general manager of the Scripps Howard News Service in Washington, D.C. His latest book has just been released. It is “Finding the News: Adventures of a Young Reporter.” It is a recount of part of Copeland’s career but it also offers advice for aspiring young journalists.

47 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Foreign Correspondents Have Played Critical Roles in American Journalism

Reporter Tania Rashid: Covering Human Tragedies Takes Toll on Journalists

Freelance journalist Tania Rashid says covering human tragedies can take a psychological toll on reporters who face human misery day-after-day. She says it is immensely distressing to see people suffering, through no fault of their own, simply because of their race or ethnicity. Rashid has spent a great amount of time covering the Rohingya refugee crisis as the Rohingya people flee Myanmar into Bangladesh to form the world’s largest refugee camp. Her reporting of the trials, tribulations and turmoils of the refugees has led to stories about terrible living conditions, lack of food, rape, abuse and sex trafficking. She even went undercover to report how Rohingya young girls are recruited to work in brothels. Rashid also reported on how 12 and 13 year old girls are being forced into marriages with strangers they don’t even know. Rashid says that witnessing such immense human tragedy forces her, as a reporter, to sometimes reach out with help for the subjects of her stories. She cannot just remain a passive observer. She also says that covering these types of stories of human carnage and degradation forces her constantly to examine her journalistic ethics. She is acutely aware sometimes of protecting the identity of her sources to prevent them from suffering further abuse because of talking with a reporter. Rashid becomes infuriated with journalism colleagues who do not protect victims that they report about and sometimes cavalierly disclose names and faces of those who may suffer more abuse for telling their stories. Rashid’s work has been seen on the PBS News Hour, CNN International, Vice News and on Al Jazeera. She has an undergraduate degree in history and global studies from UCLA and a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University. You can review Rashid’s work at her website: http://taniarashid.com/

40 MINOCT 30
Comments
Reporter Tania Rashid: Covering Human Tragedies Takes Toll on Journalists

Analyst Examines Impeachment Inquiry Poll Results on 2020 Presidential Race

Author and election analyst Kyle Kondik, from the University of Virginia Center for Politics, says the latest poll results are tipping toward favoring impeachment because voters can more easily grasp the issues comprising the Ukrainian controversy. The elements surrounding President Trump asking Ukrainian officials to provide political dirt on his potential Democratic opponent Joe Biden are much easier for voters to understand than the muddled and legalistic report from Special Counsel Robert Mueller, Kondik says. Therefore, recent polls are showing over 50 percent of Americans favoring both impeachment of the President and removal from office by the U.S. Senate. However, Kondik cautions that these early polls are volatile and can easily change. At this point, Kondik does not think there will be sufficient cross-over Republican voting in the Senate to remove Trump from office. Instead, he believes that Trump will be impeached by the Democratic House but not removed from office by the Republican Senate. Two other Presidents have had similar fates…Bill Clinton and Andrew Johnson. Richard Nixon resigned the Presidency before being officially impeached. Kondik also says that voter reaction to the impeachment process is especially important in key states like Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Ohio – where the Trump campaign has been focusing a great amount of time and resources. Although Ohio has turned more and more Republican in recent elections, Kondik still predicts that Ohio will be a bellwether state for 2020. He believes it is volatile depending on the public’s reaction to President Trump as the election nears. In 2016, Kondik authored “The Bellwether: Why Ohio Picks the President” – published by the Ohio University Press.

39 MINOCT 16
Comments
Analyst Examines Impeachment Inquiry Poll Results on 2020 Presidential Race

Trump’s Syrian Policy Fosters Chaos & Supports ISIS Resurgence Expert Says

President Donald Trump’s newly announced withdrawal of American troops from Northeastern Syria opens the door for Turkey to attack America’s Kurdish allies in the region, says Dr. Nukhet Sandal, Chair of the Political Science Department at Ohio University. The potential of Turkey attacking an unprotected U.S. ally is dangerous at many levels, according to Dr. Sandal. Primarily it sends a message to other U.S. allies that we will not stand behind them during times of international upheaval. We will not protect them, she says. It makes America untrustworthy in her view. Dr. Sandal also believes that this abandonment of the Kurds invites further meddling in this region by Turkey, Iran, and Russia. Most importantly, she notes that currently, the Kurds have about 10,000 ISIS prisoners in their custody and about 70,000 ISIS family members. The Kurds have said that if they are fighting the Turks that they will not be able to appropriately guard these prisoners and their release or escape could be imminent. Trump has said that the U.S. and its allies have totally defeated ISIS and destroyed the caliphate. However, Dr. Sandal says that ISIS can easily become reconstituted perhaps even under a different name and become a huge threat to the United States very quickly, given Trump’s decision to abandon the Kurds and this region of the Middle East. Dr. Sandal has both Turkish and Kurdish heritage. She is an award-winning teacher and researcher. She received her doctorate degree from the University of Southern California and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Watson Institute of International Studies at Brown University. She is the author of numerous academic articles for prestige journals and has written two books about religion, conflict and international relations. She also has been featured by media outlets such as the BBC, the Washington Post and the Huffington Post.

35 MINOCT 9
Comments
Trump’s Syrian Policy Fosters Chaos & Supports ISIS Resurgence Expert Says

Chris Thile Highlights the Creative Process behind His Work on “Live from Here”

Chris Thile is an acclaimed musician and songwriter, as well as the host of American Public Media’s nationally syndicated live, weekly variety show “Live From Here.” WOUB’s Emily Votaw speaks with Thile about the creative process behind his work for “Live From Here”, what it’s like to host a live radio show in 2019, and what he enjoys about performing on college campuses. Besides being a solo artist, Thile was one of the co-founders of the Grammy-winning acoustic trio, Nickel Creek, and is a member of the bluegrass group “Punch Brothers.” In 2012, Thile was a McArthur Fellow. Emily Votaw is the Culture Editor at WOUB Public Media and an occasional guest host on WOUB’s Spectrum Podcast.

10 MINOCT 4
Comments
Chris Thile Highlights the Creative Process behind His Work on “Live from Here”

College/University Enrollments Go Down as Potential Students Question Value

College and university student enrollments are in a downward spiral because of multiple factors including parents and students questioning the value of a college education, according to Dr. Richard Vedder, author, historian, columnist, and emeritus professor of economics at Ohio University. Demographically, there is a decline in the number of traditional college eligible students born during a period of low fertility in America and the numbers are expected to get worse. The number of traditional 18-22 year old students will drop more than 15% between 2025 and 2029. Currently, we are in our seventh straight year of decline nationally. Not only are there fewer students but students and parents are now questioning the value of higher education compared to the costs involved. Dr. Vedder says there is a “flight to quality” – students want to get in the elite institutions of higher learning but if they can’t many do not see a lesser ranked college or university as a viable alternative. Students look at the high costs of education, mounting student debt and balance that against the fact that 41.4 percent of college graduates are underemployed, according to Dr. Vedder. College educated students are now doing jobs that were formerly done by those with lesser education and the earnings differential between college and high school graduates is now declining, Dr. Vedder adds. In short, there are too many college graduates for the number of professional, managerial and technical jobs available. Colleges and university who are most dependent on tuition as revenue will be hurt the worst by enrollment declines and Dr. Vedder says experts are noting that many universities will either close their doors or merge with other institutions over the next two decades. He notes that universities have high labor costs and high fixed costs and those costs need to be met by enrollment driven tuitions and other fees. But, if students are not present more and more colleges and universities will find themselves in financial binds. Some educators worry that colleges and universities have been too slow to recognize these trends and are lagging behind in innovations to increase the value of degrees. Dr. Vedder is also a senior fellow at The Independent Institute and was a founding director of the Center for College Affordability and Productivity in Washington, D.C.

43 MINSEP 11
Comments
College/University Enrollments Go Down as Potential Students Question Value

Chagas Disease Is Being Battled By Ohio University Researchers and Students

Ohio University researchers and students are fighting to prevent the dreaded Chagas disease in Ecuador and its spread to the United States. Each year, according to the World Health Organization, over 8 million people are infected with Chagas disease mostly in Latin America. However, nearly 300,000 people in the United States are also infected. The disease kills nearly 20,000 people each year. Additionally, some 15,000 babies are born infected with the disease. Chagas disease is spread by a parasite called the “kissing bug” and it is prevalent in southern Ecuador. It thrives in rural and overcrowded urban centers, according to Dr. Mario Grijalva, the director of the Infectious and Tropical Disease Institute at Ohio University. To prevent the spread of the disease, new housing units must be built for families to safely occupy. These units are free of the “kissing bugs.” Dr. Grijalva’s Institute has partnered with various academic units at Ohio University to raise awareness of Chagas disease and to help raise money to build the new homes. To date, seven homes have been built and plans are to build 60 more over the next two years. When this project is completed in 2021, enough data will be available to demonstrate whether new housing can act as a viable preventative tactic against this deadly disease. Multiple colleges and departments of Ohio University are involved in this project of engaged research and service learning. For example, the Scripps College of Communication is providing marketing materials and helping to design a crowd-funding campaign, according to Dean Dr. Scott Titsworth. Ohio University also is working with the Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador (PUCE). Dr. Titsworth says that this partnership is a perfect example of community engagement on the part of both faculty and students. The work in Ecuador expands students’ world view and provides a real world laboratory for their communication skills, according to Titsworth. You can read more about this multi-disciplinary effort and how to donate to the cause at the following website. https://www.h3living.org/

43 MINSEP 4
Comments
Chagas Disease Is Being Battled By Ohio University Researchers and Students

Science Journalism Is Important to Understanding Emerging Technologies

Amy Nordrum, a veteran science journalist, feels that fact-based science reporting helps an audience navigate through new technologies and new discoveries that will impact people’s daily lives. Nordrum currently is news editor of “IEEE Spectrum,” an award-winning technology and engineering magazine based in New York City. She also is a frequent guest on Public Radio’s “Science Friday” with Ira Flatow talking about a wide-range of science topics. Nordrum writes and edits news stories about computing, artificial intelligence, power and energy, biomedical engineering, and telecommunications. Her favorite stories cover elements of business and technology and explain the importance of technology to the average person. She says she really enjoys her guest appearances on Science Friday. She tells us how the appearances are scheduled and how she prepares for the show. Over her journalism career, Nordrum has done a wide range of science reporting. She has written about health care, biotech, and pharmaceuticals for the “International Business Times,” based in New York City before joining IEEE Spectrum. Nordrum earned her master’s degree in science journalism from New York University and her bachelor’s degree in journalism from Ohio University. She recently appeared at Ohio University to talk about ethics in science journalism. Nordrum is currently completing an MBA with a focus on media management at New York University’s Stern School of Business.

36 MINJUN 26
Comments
Science Journalism Is Important to Understanding Emerging Technologies

Midwest TV/Media Critic has Rich Career Despite His Heartland Location

Most entertainment news is generated on the east or west coasts and not in the heartland. Yet, John Kiesewetter spent 40 professional years at the “Cincinnati Enquirer” and three decades as its “Television Critic” writing everything from local criticism to major features. After his job was eliminated at the Enquirer, his career continues to this day. He is now the TV/Media reporter for Cincinnati Public Radio, WVXU FM and wvxu.org. There he writes an almost daily blog, and contributes on-air interviews to various locally generated radio programs. “I had a great run when newspapers were great, when papers had big features staffs and money to travel,” Kiesewetter says. Travel allowed him access to major celebrities and the latest in entertainment news. But, Kiesewetter doesn’t want just any story. Instead, he focuses on stories he thinks are important to the average listener and reader. That philosophy has served him well. He tells us how he traveled to meet stars as well as talking with celebrities who came through Cincinnati. He has talked with classic comic performers like Lucille Ball, Bob Newhart, Bob Hope, Stan Freberg, Sid Caesar, Carl Reiner, Steve Allen, Red Skelton, Don Knotts, Andy Griffith and Bill Cosby. He also focused on celebrities with local Southwest Ohio backgrounds such as: George Clooney, Woody Harrelson, Martin Sheen, Rob Lowe, Allison Janney, Johnathan Winters, David Letterman and sports commentator Dan Patrick. The list of stars he has interviewed is endless and his stories are captivating. In addition to covering the typical entertainment fare, Kiesewetter started critiquing local newscasts and anchors and he has a passion for sports commentators and play-by-play people such as Red Barber, Bob Costas, Al Michaels, Chris Collinsworth, Pete Rose, Joe Nuxhall and Marty Brennamen. He is currently writing a book about the life of former Cincinnati Reds pitcher and long-time broadcaster Joe Nuxhall. “I think part of my success as a TV/Media writer is my solid news training, so I could cover a breaking story, see a trend story, and write a news personality profile, either on a local or a national level,” Kiesewetter adds. “I wasn’t a real flashy writer, but I was informative as hell.”

49 MINJUN 19
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Midwest TV/Media Critic has Rich Career Despite His Heartland Location
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