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Tatter

Michael Sargent

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Tatter

Tatter

Michael Sargent

1
Followers
6
Plays
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About Us

Hosted by social psychologist Michael Sargent, this podcast has become a place for conversation about policy and politics, where Sargent talks with people who nerd out on the topics, bringing extensive knowledge, including knowledge of the limits of their knowledge. These nerds don't have the pocket protectors and social awkwardness of nerd stereotypes. They have wit, a love of fun, and most importantly, an understanding gained from the tattered pages of journals, books, and printouts of statistical analyses, or they've been tattered by experience. As host, Sargent isn't above asking dumb questions, because he knows we all learn from the answers.If you're looking for overconfident, ill-informed (or misinformed) bloviation, this isn't the place for you. (But maybe Fox & Friends is.) If that's the opposite of what you want, then stick around.

Latest Episodes

Episode 46: Measure for Measure (Wil Cunningham & Uli Schimmack Discuss the Implicit Association Test)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Since Tony Greenwald, Debbie McGhee, and Jordan Schwartz introduced the Implicit Association Test to the published literature in 1998, the IAT has taken social psychology by storm, and the notion that implicit bias is prevalent and impactful has taken the world by storm. But to what extent are popular beliefs, and popularizing claims, about implicit bias and the IAT well-supported by the science? What improvements are needed in the science of implicit bias? Does that research qualify as good science? Is it useful? And what does "implicit" even mean in this context? Psychologists Wil Cunningham and Ulrich Schimmack engage with each other and with me in a lively discussion of such issues, including conversation about Uli's 2019 paper, "The Implicit Association Test: A Method in Search of a Construct." LINKS --Wil Cunningham's profile at the University of Toronto --Uli Schimmack's profile at the University of Toronto --Project Implicit website --Schimmack (2019), The Implicit Association Test: A method in search of a construct, Perspectives on Psychological Science --link to a free version of the paper, housed at Schimmack's site --Cunningham, Preacher, & Banaji (2001). Implicit attitude measures: Consistency, stability, and convergent validity. Psychological ScienceSpecial Guests: Uli Schimmack and Wil Cunningham.

66 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 46: Measure for Measure (Wil Cunningham & Uli Schimmack Discuss the Implicit Association Test)

Episode 45: Correctional Training (w/ J. Pfaff & M. Rocque)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE John Pfaff is Professor of Law at Fordham University, and has areas of expertise that include prisons, criminal law, and sentencing law. Michael Rocque is Associate Professor of Sociology at Bates College, and his areas of expertise include criminological theory, racial disparities in the criminal justice system, and desistance from crime. He has also worked as Senior Research Advisor with the Maine Department of Corrections. In this episode, we use the recent death of Jeffrey Epstein as well as ongoing mass shootings as jumping off points for a wide-ranging conversation about jail and prison conditions, mental illness and mass public shootings, criminal justice reform, and more, including discussion of at least one U.S. presidential candidate. LINKS --John Pfaff's Fordham profile --Mike Rocque's Bates profile --Locked In: The True Causes of Mass Incarceration and How to Achieve Real Reform (by John Pfaff) --"Actually, there is a clear link between mass shootings and mental illness," (by Grant Duwe and Michael Rocque, for the Los Angeles Times) --Stephanie Kelley-Romano's Bates profile --"What we know about the conditions at the prison where Jeffrey Epstein died," (from National Public Radio) --Wiki entry on the Prison Litigation Reform Act --"America's most interesting sheriff" (Economist article on Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart) --Rocque's Scholars Strategy Network profile --"Megan Rapinoe did not stomp on the flag. Here's why people got outraged regardless," (by Rocque, for Newsweek) --"Justice and safety for all," (Bernie Sanders's criminal justice reform plan)Special Guests: John Pfaff and Mike Rocque.

59 MIN2019 AUG 22
Comments
Episode 45: Correctional Training (w/ J. Pfaff & M. Rocque)

Episode 44: Interim Ad Infinitum (On The Use and Abuse of Presidential Appointment Power)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Steve Vladeck is the A. Dalton Cross Professor in Law at the University of Texas School of Law. He's also a prolific writer and CNN's Supreme Court analyst, and he's argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. He joined me to discuss the President's power to appoint individuals in an acting capacity in senior positions. This is a power that can be abused--and some would argue has been abused by President Trump. We discuss the power, and possible reforms that could limit abuse. LINKS Steve Vladeck's UT-Austin profile "Trump is abusing his authority to name 'acting secretaries': Here's how Congress can stop him." (by Vladeck, for Slate) "Trump relies on acting Cabinet officials more than most presidents. It's not an accident." (by Phillip Bump, for the Washington Post) "How America got to 'zero tolerance' on immigration: The inside story," (by Jason Zengerle, for the New York Times) "Supreme Court rules against Apple, as Kavanaugh sides with liberal Justices." (by Bill Chappell, for National Public Radio) The Federal Vacancies Reform ActSpecial Guest: Stephen Vladeck.

30 MIN2019 AUG 6
Comments
Episode 44: Interim Ad Infinitum (On The Use and Abuse of Presidential Appointment Power)

Episode 43: Trash Talk (w/ Jeffrey M. Berry)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Political scientist Jeffrey M. Berry and sociologist Sarah Sobieraj co-authored the book The Outrage Industry, which examines media efforts to provoke outrage in audiences (including efforts that play fast and loose with the facts), as well as the conditions that have encouraged and rewarded such efforts. Berry joined me for a conversation about incivility, outrage rhetoric, and more. LINKS --Tufts University profile for Jeffrey Berry --Tufts University profile for Sarah Sobieraj --The Outrage Industry: Political Opinion Media and the New Incivility, by Berry and Sobieraj (Amazon) --"Anger is a business" (by Berry and Sobieraj, for Vox's Mischiefs of Faction) --"New Republic: Rush Limbaugh's morality lesson" (by Jonathan Cohn, for National Public Radio) --Forbes: The world's highest-paid celebrites --"The caning of Charles Sumner" (from the United States Senate website) --"Clear Channel renames itself iHeartMedia in nod to digital" (by Ben Sisario, for the New York Times) --"Congress is more bipartisan than you think" (by Laurel Harbridge-Yong, for the Washington Post's Monkey Cage)Special Guest: Jeffrey M. Berry.

30 MIN2019 JUN 24
Comments
Episode 43: Trash Talk (w/ Jeffrey M. Berry)

Episode 42: Grace Under Pressure (An Abortion Provider In The South)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Lori Beard-Williams is clinic director at Little Rock Family Planning Services, the only full-service abortion provider in the state of Arkansas (my home state). She is also on the Board of Directors of the National Abortion Federation. Given the legislation that's been coming out of such state legislatures as Alabama, Missouri, and Arkansas, we thought abortion was a timely topic. We discuss her professional path, as well as her patients, and the challenges facing her, her team, and the patients they serve. LINKS --Little Rock Family Planning Services --Arkansas Abortion Support Network --"This Doctor Won't Stop Mailing Abortion Pills to the U.S.--Even Though the FDA Ordered Her To," by Carter Sherman (Vice News)Special Guest: Lori Beard-Williams.

45 MIN2019 MAY 22
Comments
Episode 42: Grace Under Pressure (An Abortion Provider In The South)

Episode 41: Judgment Call (The Impeachment Episode)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Julia Azari is a political scientist at Marquette University, as well as a frequent contributor to FiveThirtyEight. Seth Masket is a political scientist at the University of Denver, and a contributor to Vox.com's Mischiefs of Faction. The three of us talked about the prospects of impeaching Donald Trump, the potential aftermath, and why it all matters. LINKS --Julia Azari's Marquette University profile --Seth Masket's University of Denver profile --"The Trump Era Has Pushed Scholars to the Limits of Our Understanding," by Julia Azari (guest blogger) at Balkinization --"'Impeachment Will Help Republicans' And Other Myths," by Seth Masket, in Pacific Standard --A recent chat about impeachment, at FiveThirtyEight (including Azari)Special Guests: Julia Azari and Seth Masket.

52 MIN2019 MAY 17
Comments
Episode 41: Judgment Call (The Impeachment Episode)

Episode 40: Up That Hill (Women in Congress)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE As reported by the Pew Reserach Center, the current 116th Congress includes more women, and is more racially and ethnically diverse, than any previous Congress. Inspired by that shift, this episode features my conversation with political scientists Nadia Brown (Purdue University) and Barbara Palmer (Baldwin Wallace University). We discuss the experiences of women in Congress, including women of color, both in their campaigns but also while governing, and from both contemporary and historical perspective. LINKS --Nadia Brown's Purdue University profile --Barbara Palmer's Baldwin Wallace University profile --Sisters in the Statehouse: Black Women and Legislative Decision Making, by Nadia Brown (at Amazon) --Women and Congressional Elections: A Century of Change, by Barbara Palmer and Dennis Simon (at Amazon) --"Identity Politics Strengthens Democracy," by Stacey Abrams, in Foreign Affairs --On Elizabeth Cady Stanton's congressional run --"At She the People Forum, 2020 Candidates Speak Directly to Women of Color, by Maggie Astor, for the New York Times --Wiki on Maria Stewart --"Eric Holder to Lead Democrats' Attack on Republican Gerrymandering, by Alexander Burns and Jonathan Martin, for the New York Times --Barbara Palmer on "gendermandering"Special Guests: Barbara Palmer and Nadia Brown.

58 MIN2019 MAY 6
Comments
Episode 40: Up That Hill (Women in Congress)

Episode 39: Pocket Protection (Compensating College Athletes)

EABOUT THIS EPISODE In a report by Chris Smith, Forbes lists Texas A&M University's football program as the most profitable in the 2014-2016 seasons. Its three-year average for revenue across those seasons was $148 million. Its three-year average for profit was $107 million. It was the leader of the pack, but far from alone. The 10th most profitable program (at the University of Florida) was listed at $67 million in profit. The 25th (Texas Tech's) was listed at $31 million in profit. Through broadcast licensing and other revenue streams, many NCAA programs generate immense revenue, particularly programs in the so-called Power Five conferences (the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12, and SEC). Additionally, head coaches at many of these programs are highly paid, such as Alabama's Nick Saban, whose base salary for 2019 was reported to be $7.9 million. Given the amount of money generated in Power Five college football (and also NCAA Division I men's basketball), and the compensation afforded many coaches, some observers have called for greater financial compensation for the athletes. But others object. And these battles sometimes go to the courts, as in the recent Alston v. NCAA decision. I discuss these issues with Rick Karcher, an associate professor in the Eastern Michigan University School of Health Promotion & Human Performance. LINKS --Rick Karcher's Eastern Michigan University profile --"Why the NCAA Lost Its Latest Landmark Case in the Battle Over What Schools Can Offer Athletes," by Michael McCann in Sports Illustrated --O'Bannon v. NCAA (Wikipedia) --"The Battle Outside of the Courtroom: Principles of Amateurism vs. Principles of Supply and Demand," by Karcher (2013) --"The Coaching Carousel in Big-Time Intercollegiate Athletics: Economic Implications and Legal Considerations," by Karcher (2010) --"The Influence of Race on Attitudes About College Athletics," by Druckman, Howat, and Rodheim (2016) --Wikipedia entry on adhesion contracts --The Historical Basketball LeagueSpecial Guest: Richard Karcher.

54 MIN2019 APR 24
Comments
Episode 39: Pocket Protection (Compensating College Athletes)

Episode 38: Just Theory (w/ John Jost & Jim Sidanius)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Historically, many activists and organizers have struggled to enact their visions of social justice, and many do so to this very day. What role, if any, can and should social psychology play in such struggles? Do we have a role to play? Or do the risks of such engagement outweigh any potential rewards? In this episode, I discuss such issues with social psychologists John Jost and Jim Sidanius. Jost co-crafted system justification theory, and Sidanius co-crafted social dominance theory, each a theory relevant to social justice. LINKS --John Jost's NYU profile --Jim Sidanius's Harvard profile --"Digital Dissent: An Analysis of the Motivational Contents of Tweets From an Occupy Wall Street Demonstration," by Langer, Jost, et al. (2018) --"Ethnic and National Attachment in the Rainbow Nation: The Case of the Republic of South Africa," by Sidanius, Brubacher, and Silinda (2019)Special Guests: Jim Sidanius and John Jost.

53 MIN2019 MAR 28
Comments
Episode 38: Just Theory (w/ John Jost & Jim Sidanius)

Episode 37: Level Up (Advancing Foreign Policy Through Feminism)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE As world leaders set their countries' foreign policies, history might seem an obvious basis upon which to base sound policy. Other potential bases that might seem obvious include game theory and perhaps even evolutionary theory. But is feminism an underappreciated basis? I discuss this topic with Jamille Bigio, Alexandra Bro, and Rachel Vogelstein, all at the Council on Foreign Relations. At a time when Sweden explicitly labels its foreign policy as "feminist," we explore what that means and whether there's evidence that feminist foreign policy is smart foreign policy. LINKS --Jamille Bigio's CFR profile --Alexandra Bro's CFR profile --Rachel Vogelstein's CFR profile --"Sweden's Feminist Foreign Policy: Long May It Reign" (by Rachel Vogelstein and Alexandra Bro, in Foreign Policy) --"Growing Economies Through Gender Parity" (interactive CFR report) --"Countering Sexual Violence in Conflict" (by Jamille Bigio and Rachel Vogelstein) --Nadia Murad Wikipedia entry --D...

57 MIN2019 MAR 11
Comments
Episode 37: Level Up (Advancing Foreign Policy Through Feminism)

Latest Episodes

Episode 46: Measure for Measure (Wil Cunningham & Uli Schimmack Discuss the Implicit Association Test)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Since Tony Greenwald, Debbie McGhee, and Jordan Schwartz introduced the Implicit Association Test to the published literature in 1998, the IAT has taken social psychology by storm, and the notion that implicit bias is prevalent and impactful has taken the world by storm. But to what extent are popular beliefs, and popularizing claims, about implicit bias and the IAT well-supported by the science? What improvements are needed in the science of implicit bias? Does that research qualify as good science? Is it useful? And what does "implicit" even mean in this context? Psychologists Wil Cunningham and Ulrich Schimmack engage with each other and with me in a lively discussion of such issues, including conversation about Uli's 2019 paper, "The Implicit Association Test: A Method in Search of a Construct." LINKS --Wil Cunningham's profile at the University of Toronto --Uli Schimmack's profile at the University of Toronto --Project Implicit website --Schimmack (2019), The Implicit Association Test: A method in search of a construct, Perspectives on Psychological Science --link to a free version of the paper, housed at Schimmack's site --Cunningham, Preacher, & Banaji (2001). Implicit attitude measures: Consistency, stability, and convergent validity. Psychological ScienceSpecial Guests: Uli Schimmack and Wil Cunningham.

66 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 46: Measure for Measure (Wil Cunningham & Uli Schimmack Discuss the Implicit Association Test)

Episode 45: Correctional Training (w/ J. Pfaff & M. Rocque)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE John Pfaff is Professor of Law at Fordham University, and has areas of expertise that include prisons, criminal law, and sentencing law. Michael Rocque is Associate Professor of Sociology at Bates College, and his areas of expertise include criminological theory, racial disparities in the criminal justice system, and desistance from crime. He has also worked as Senior Research Advisor with the Maine Department of Corrections. In this episode, we use the recent death of Jeffrey Epstein as well as ongoing mass shootings as jumping off points for a wide-ranging conversation about jail and prison conditions, mental illness and mass public shootings, criminal justice reform, and more, including discussion of at least one U.S. presidential candidate. LINKS --John Pfaff's Fordham profile --Mike Rocque's Bates profile --Locked In: The True Causes of Mass Incarceration and How to Achieve Real Reform (by John Pfaff) --"Actually, there is a clear link between mass shootings and mental illness," (by Grant Duwe and Michael Rocque, for the Los Angeles Times) --Stephanie Kelley-Romano's Bates profile --"What we know about the conditions at the prison where Jeffrey Epstein died," (from National Public Radio) --Wiki entry on the Prison Litigation Reform Act --"America's most interesting sheriff" (Economist article on Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart) --Rocque's Scholars Strategy Network profile --"Megan Rapinoe did not stomp on the flag. Here's why people got outraged regardless," (by Rocque, for Newsweek) --"Justice and safety for all," (Bernie Sanders's criminal justice reform plan)Special Guests: John Pfaff and Mike Rocque.

59 MIN2019 AUG 22
Comments
Episode 45: Correctional Training (w/ J. Pfaff & M. Rocque)

Episode 44: Interim Ad Infinitum (On The Use and Abuse of Presidential Appointment Power)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Steve Vladeck is the A. Dalton Cross Professor in Law at the University of Texas School of Law. He's also a prolific writer and CNN's Supreme Court analyst, and he's argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. He joined me to discuss the President's power to appoint individuals in an acting capacity in senior positions. This is a power that can be abused--and some would argue has been abused by President Trump. We discuss the power, and possible reforms that could limit abuse. LINKS Steve Vladeck's UT-Austin profile "Trump is abusing his authority to name 'acting secretaries': Here's how Congress can stop him." (by Vladeck, for Slate) "Trump relies on acting Cabinet officials more than most presidents. It's not an accident." (by Phillip Bump, for the Washington Post) "How America got to 'zero tolerance' on immigration: The inside story," (by Jason Zengerle, for the New York Times) "Supreme Court rules against Apple, as Kavanaugh sides with liberal Justices." (by Bill Chappell, for National Public Radio) The Federal Vacancies Reform ActSpecial Guest: Stephen Vladeck.

30 MIN2019 AUG 6
Comments
Episode 44: Interim Ad Infinitum (On The Use and Abuse of Presidential Appointment Power)

Episode 43: Trash Talk (w/ Jeffrey M. Berry)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Political scientist Jeffrey M. Berry and sociologist Sarah Sobieraj co-authored the book The Outrage Industry, which examines media efforts to provoke outrage in audiences (including efforts that play fast and loose with the facts), as well as the conditions that have encouraged and rewarded such efforts. Berry joined me for a conversation about incivility, outrage rhetoric, and more. LINKS --Tufts University profile for Jeffrey Berry --Tufts University profile for Sarah Sobieraj --The Outrage Industry: Political Opinion Media and the New Incivility, by Berry and Sobieraj (Amazon) --"Anger is a business" (by Berry and Sobieraj, for Vox's Mischiefs of Faction) --"New Republic: Rush Limbaugh's morality lesson" (by Jonathan Cohn, for National Public Radio) --Forbes: The world's highest-paid celebrites --"The caning of Charles Sumner" (from the United States Senate website) --"Clear Channel renames itself iHeartMedia in nod to digital" (by Ben Sisario, for the New York Times) --"Congress is more bipartisan than you think" (by Laurel Harbridge-Yong, for the Washington Post's Monkey Cage)Special Guest: Jeffrey M. Berry.

30 MIN2019 JUN 24
Comments
Episode 43: Trash Talk (w/ Jeffrey M. Berry)

Episode 42: Grace Under Pressure (An Abortion Provider In The South)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Lori Beard-Williams is clinic director at Little Rock Family Planning Services, the only full-service abortion provider in the state of Arkansas (my home state). She is also on the Board of Directors of the National Abortion Federation. Given the legislation that's been coming out of such state legislatures as Alabama, Missouri, and Arkansas, we thought abortion was a timely topic. We discuss her professional path, as well as her patients, and the challenges facing her, her team, and the patients they serve. LINKS --Little Rock Family Planning Services --Arkansas Abortion Support Network --"This Doctor Won't Stop Mailing Abortion Pills to the U.S.--Even Though the FDA Ordered Her To," by Carter Sherman (Vice News)Special Guest: Lori Beard-Williams.

45 MIN2019 MAY 22
Comments
Episode 42: Grace Under Pressure (An Abortion Provider In The South)

Episode 41: Judgment Call (The Impeachment Episode)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Julia Azari is a political scientist at Marquette University, as well as a frequent contributor to FiveThirtyEight. Seth Masket is a political scientist at the University of Denver, and a contributor to Vox.com's Mischiefs of Faction. The three of us talked about the prospects of impeaching Donald Trump, the potential aftermath, and why it all matters. LINKS --Julia Azari's Marquette University profile --Seth Masket's University of Denver profile --"The Trump Era Has Pushed Scholars to the Limits of Our Understanding," by Julia Azari (guest blogger) at Balkinization --"'Impeachment Will Help Republicans' And Other Myths," by Seth Masket, in Pacific Standard --A recent chat about impeachment, at FiveThirtyEight (including Azari)Special Guests: Julia Azari and Seth Masket.

52 MIN2019 MAY 17
Comments
Episode 41: Judgment Call (The Impeachment Episode)

Episode 40: Up That Hill (Women in Congress)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE As reported by the Pew Reserach Center, the current 116th Congress includes more women, and is more racially and ethnically diverse, than any previous Congress. Inspired by that shift, this episode features my conversation with political scientists Nadia Brown (Purdue University) and Barbara Palmer (Baldwin Wallace University). We discuss the experiences of women in Congress, including women of color, both in their campaigns but also while governing, and from both contemporary and historical perspective. LINKS --Nadia Brown's Purdue University profile --Barbara Palmer's Baldwin Wallace University profile --Sisters in the Statehouse: Black Women and Legislative Decision Making, by Nadia Brown (at Amazon) --Women and Congressional Elections: A Century of Change, by Barbara Palmer and Dennis Simon (at Amazon) --"Identity Politics Strengthens Democracy," by Stacey Abrams, in Foreign Affairs --On Elizabeth Cady Stanton's congressional run --"At She the People Forum, 2020 Candidates Speak Directly to Women of Color, by Maggie Astor, for the New York Times --Wiki on Maria Stewart --"Eric Holder to Lead Democrats' Attack on Republican Gerrymandering, by Alexander Burns and Jonathan Martin, for the New York Times --Barbara Palmer on "gendermandering"Special Guests: Barbara Palmer and Nadia Brown.

58 MIN2019 MAY 6
Comments
Episode 40: Up That Hill (Women in Congress)

Episode 39: Pocket Protection (Compensating College Athletes)

EABOUT THIS EPISODE In a report by Chris Smith, Forbes lists Texas A&M University's football program as the most profitable in the 2014-2016 seasons. Its three-year average for revenue across those seasons was $148 million. Its three-year average for profit was $107 million. It was the leader of the pack, but far from alone. The 10th most profitable program (at the University of Florida) was listed at $67 million in profit. The 25th (Texas Tech's) was listed at $31 million in profit. Through broadcast licensing and other revenue streams, many NCAA programs generate immense revenue, particularly programs in the so-called Power Five conferences (the ACC, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12, and SEC). Additionally, head coaches at many of these programs are highly paid, such as Alabama's Nick Saban, whose base salary for 2019 was reported to be $7.9 million. Given the amount of money generated in Power Five college football (and also NCAA Division I men's basketball), and the compensation afforded many coaches, some observers have called for greater financial compensation for the athletes. But others object. And these battles sometimes go to the courts, as in the recent Alston v. NCAA decision. I discuss these issues with Rick Karcher, an associate professor in the Eastern Michigan University School of Health Promotion & Human Performance. LINKS --Rick Karcher's Eastern Michigan University profile --"Why the NCAA Lost Its Latest Landmark Case in the Battle Over What Schools Can Offer Athletes," by Michael McCann in Sports Illustrated --O'Bannon v. NCAA (Wikipedia) --"The Battle Outside of the Courtroom: Principles of Amateurism vs. Principles of Supply and Demand," by Karcher (2013) --"The Coaching Carousel in Big-Time Intercollegiate Athletics: Economic Implications and Legal Considerations," by Karcher (2010) --"The Influence of Race on Attitudes About College Athletics," by Druckman, Howat, and Rodheim (2016) --Wikipedia entry on adhesion contracts --The Historical Basketball LeagueSpecial Guest: Richard Karcher.

54 MIN2019 APR 24
Comments
Episode 39: Pocket Protection (Compensating College Athletes)

Episode 38: Just Theory (w/ John Jost & Jim Sidanius)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE Historically, many activists and organizers have struggled to enact their visions of social justice, and many do so to this very day. What role, if any, can and should social psychology play in such struggles? Do we have a role to play? Or do the risks of such engagement outweigh any potential rewards? In this episode, I discuss such issues with social psychologists John Jost and Jim Sidanius. Jost co-crafted system justification theory, and Sidanius co-crafted social dominance theory, each a theory relevant to social justice. LINKS --John Jost's NYU profile --Jim Sidanius's Harvard profile --"Digital Dissent: An Analysis of the Motivational Contents of Tweets From an Occupy Wall Street Demonstration," by Langer, Jost, et al. (2018) --"Ethnic and National Attachment in the Rainbow Nation: The Case of the Republic of South Africa," by Sidanius, Brubacher, and Silinda (2019)Special Guests: Jim Sidanius and John Jost.

53 MIN2019 MAR 28
Comments
Episode 38: Just Theory (w/ John Jost & Jim Sidanius)

Episode 37: Level Up (Advancing Foreign Policy Through Feminism)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE As world leaders set their countries' foreign policies, history might seem an obvious basis upon which to base sound policy. Other potential bases that might seem obvious include game theory and perhaps even evolutionary theory. But is feminism an underappreciated basis? I discuss this topic with Jamille Bigio, Alexandra Bro, and Rachel Vogelstein, all at the Council on Foreign Relations. At a time when Sweden explicitly labels its foreign policy as "feminist," we explore what that means and whether there's evidence that feminist foreign policy is smart foreign policy. LINKS --Jamille Bigio's CFR profile --Alexandra Bro's CFR profile --Rachel Vogelstein's CFR profile --"Sweden's Feminist Foreign Policy: Long May It Reign" (by Rachel Vogelstein and Alexandra Bro, in Foreign Policy) --"Growing Economies Through Gender Parity" (interactive CFR report) --"Countering Sexual Violence in Conflict" (by Jamille Bigio and Rachel Vogelstein) --Nadia Murad Wikipedia entry --D...

57 MIN2019 MAR 11
Comments
Episode 37: Level Up (Advancing Foreign Policy Through Feminism)
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