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The Point Blank Show

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The Point Blank Show

The Point Blank Show

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About Us

The Point Blank Show is an excuse to spend sometime with people having immense insights and significant achievements. The guests on the show range from entrepreneurs, artists, business leaders, writer, sports personality etc. Each show attempts to bring out insights and often making us think about things that aren't obvious.

Latest Episodes

A conversation with Edward Carr, Foreign editor of The Economist on US foreign policy

Edward Carr, Foreign editor of The Economist takes us through his brilliant special report on US foreign policy. He argues that inspite of a dreadful decade abroad, Americans are unduly pessimistic about their place in the world. The rise of China as a formidable player in world affairs is undisputed, but its economic heft does not yet qualify it to be a geopolitical influence that America wields. In this podcast he talks about some of important keywords that have bothered US in the last few months. Syria, spying, counter insurgency and what are some of the alternatives, if any, to an American dominated international world order. And he does incredibly well in the rapid fire round, right at the end, which is reserved for our friends at The Economist.

25 MIN2014 JAN 4
Comments
A conversation with Edward Carr, Foreign editor of The Economist on US foreign policy

Jon Fasman of The Economist on his experience of covering the US presidential elections

In this podcast, Jon Fasman of The Economist talks about his on ground experience of covering the US presidential elections. Over the past few months Jon travelled across the country, attended rallies, conducted interviews, met strangers, filed articles, wrote online, did live blogging, recorded podcasts and met crazy deadlines. To report the greatest political event on the planet, a little bit of insomnia came in handy too. Given a chance, would he do it again. In a heartbeat, he says.

18 MIN2012 NOV 22
Comments
Jon Fasman of The Economist on his experience of covering the US presidential elections

A Conversation with Paul Markillie of The Economist on Digital Manufacturing

Paul Markillie, the Innovation Editor at The Economist joins us to talk about the magical world of digital manufacturing, the subject of his special report which was published earlier this year. In this 20 minute chat Paul shares his experiences which took him to some interesting places across the world. This third revolution has already taken off. For instance, in 2008 at the Beijing Olympics, 23 of the 25 world records in swimming were broken not just because the players trained hard, but they wore body suits which mimicked shark skin making them more hydro-dynamic. It had a lot to do with the new-age manufacturing process which has sprung up new kinds of materials. They help make groundbreaking products cheaply. Although the concept of 3D printing is relatively new, Paul reckons that we may soon see service engineers not having to scratch their heads for that elusive spare part which can fix your washing machine. They could just print that piece of plastic or metal to the exact s...

20 MIN2012 JUL 28
Comments
A Conversation with Paul Markillie of The Economist on Digital Manufacturing

A Conversation with Simon Wright of The Economist on Natural Gas

The Economists deputy news editor, Simon Wright is so good at dismembering jargons that you might even start to care about knowing a little something about natural gas, the subject of his special report that was published this month. In this podcast, Simon gives us a crash course in Shale gas and explains why is it a big deal that America has started to mine more of it in the last few years. He reckons that it may still take a while for developing countries to get their hands on it, but this discovery could lead to some interesting political repercussions in world economy.

17 MIN2012 JUL 23
Comments
A Conversation with Simon Wright of The Economist on Natural Gas

A Conversation with Jon Fasman of The Economist on American Economy, Drugs and Journalism

Jon Fasman knows what it takes to be a New York Times best selling author. His book, Geographer's Library published in 2005 has been released into more than a dozen languages and his more recent novel, The Unpossessed City is a major hit. At The Economist, he covers a diverse range of subjects like food, music, chopsticks, politics, Tiger Woods, Dominique Strauss Kahn, global warming and a lot more. In this podcast, talks about American politics, drugs and Atlanta. Incidentally, Jon was working in a building close to the twin towers on September 11, 2001 and he shares his thoughts about where USA stands today, in the midst of very high unemployment rates and terror strikes. For the ones interested to know more about drugs, skip to the 12th minute to hear this father of two young kids having a refreshingly liberal attitude towards solving the problem of drug abuse which plagues not just America, but many other nations.

22 MIN2011 SEP 15
Comments
A Conversation with Jon Fasman of The Economist on American Economy, Drugs and Journalism

Philip Coggan on his Special Report on Pensions

Philip Coggan, the Capital Markets Editor of The Economist joins us to talk about his special report on Pensions. Things have changed quite a bit since the first pension scheme was introduced by Otto Von Bismarck back in the 19th century. As people in developed countries are living longer, the pressure on the working population is mounting steadily to support the greying economies. In this podcast, Philip suggests different ways to tackle this problem by citing examples of governments which are doing it right and a few others which aren't.

19 MIN2011 MAY 3
Comments
Philip Coggan on his Special Report on Pensions

Lane Greene of The Economist on his book, You are What You Speak

Robert Lane Greene, the International Correspondent of The Economist has released his first book titled, You Are What You Speak. In this podcast, Lane clearly distinguishes the sticklers from the linguists. While he supports those who strive to write and talk by making use of correct grammar, he is against the mindless infatuation with the subject. He also tells us a bit about the process of writing his book while juggling between a day job and learning new languages while at it.

23 MIN2011 APR 7
Comments
Lane Greene of The Economist on his book, You are What You Speak

Point Blank with Nitin Chandrakant Desai

In our film industry, what Amitabh Bachchan or Dilip Kumar is to acting, Nitin Chandrakant Desai is to art direction. The winner of four national awards and many successful movies such as Lagaan, Devdas, Jodha Akbar, Hum Dil Dechuke Sanam, Munnabhai, etc talks about his craft and the challenges of his everyday job. He takes us through his experiece of working with directors like Vidhu Vinod Chopra, Sanjay Leela Bhansai, Danny Boyle and Ashutosh Gowarikar. His job demands him to think on his feet and deliver results in open sets where temperature can soar up to 45 degrees.This podcast charts the journey of the man who once lived in a 10X10 Worli chawl and today is Indias most respected Art Director who still maintains the modesty of a newcomer.

39 MIN2011 APR 5
Comments
Point Blank with Nitin Chandrakant Desai

Kenneth Cukier from The Economist on the Japan crisis from Ground Zero

Kenneth Cukier is Japan Business and Finance correspondent of The Economist, but in the last couple of weeks, Kenn has stared at one of the most grueling assignments of his career. He is covering Japans largest earthquake, visiting disaster zones and making sense of the mayhem. In this podcast, Kenneth who is at ground zero salutes the spirit of the Japanese who are ploughing through the crisis with aplomb. He does not mince words while criticizing the Tokyo Electric Power Company which is at the core of the nuclear reactor crisis.

22 MIN2011 MAR 25
Comments
Kenneth Cukier from The Economist on the Japan crisis from Ground Zero

Prof Kanu Doshi on the Union Budget 2011

Prof Kanu Doshi and his quintessential humour join us by branding this years Union budget as an Accountants budget which is neither beneficial for the khaas aadmi nor the aam aadmi. Kanu bhai takes us through the different benefits that the common man can enjoy until the Direct Tax Code is introduced in the coming year. This podcast decodes jargons like AMT, LLP, DDT and many more. The Finance Minister lay special thrust on infrastructure by alloting more than Rs. 2000 crore for development of roadways, etc. Inviting foreign companies to invest in the infrastructure bonds by increasing the ceiling limit from 5 billion USD to 25 billion USD is one of the highlights of this year's budget and Kanu bhai tells us why.

30 MIN2011 MAR 16
Comments
Prof Kanu Doshi on the Union Budget 2011

Latest Episodes

A conversation with Edward Carr, Foreign editor of The Economist on US foreign policy

Edward Carr, Foreign editor of The Economist takes us through his brilliant special report on US foreign policy. He argues that inspite of a dreadful decade abroad, Americans are unduly pessimistic about their place in the world. The rise of China as a formidable player in world affairs is undisputed, but its economic heft does not yet qualify it to be a geopolitical influence that America wields. In this podcast he talks about some of important keywords that have bothered US in the last few months. Syria, spying, counter insurgency and what are some of the alternatives, if any, to an American dominated international world order. And he does incredibly well in the rapid fire round, right at the end, which is reserved for our friends at The Economist.

25 MIN2014 JAN 4
Comments
A conversation with Edward Carr, Foreign editor of The Economist on US foreign policy

Jon Fasman of The Economist on his experience of covering the US presidential elections

In this podcast, Jon Fasman of The Economist talks about his on ground experience of covering the US presidential elections. Over the past few months Jon travelled across the country, attended rallies, conducted interviews, met strangers, filed articles, wrote online, did live blogging, recorded podcasts and met crazy deadlines. To report the greatest political event on the planet, a little bit of insomnia came in handy too. Given a chance, would he do it again. In a heartbeat, he says.

18 MIN2012 NOV 22
Comments
Jon Fasman of The Economist on his experience of covering the US presidential elections

A Conversation with Paul Markillie of The Economist on Digital Manufacturing

Paul Markillie, the Innovation Editor at The Economist joins us to talk about the magical world of digital manufacturing, the subject of his special report which was published earlier this year. In this 20 minute chat Paul shares his experiences which took him to some interesting places across the world. This third revolution has already taken off. For instance, in 2008 at the Beijing Olympics, 23 of the 25 world records in swimming were broken not just because the players trained hard, but they wore body suits which mimicked shark skin making them more hydro-dynamic. It had a lot to do with the new-age manufacturing process which has sprung up new kinds of materials. They help make groundbreaking products cheaply. Although the concept of 3D printing is relatively new, Paul reckons that we may soon see service engineers not having to scratch their heads for that elusive spare part which can fix your washing machine. They could just print that piece of plastic or metal to the exact s...

20 MIN2012 JUL 28
Comments
A Conversation with Paul Markillie of The Economist on Digital Manufacturing

A Conversation with Simon Wright of The Economist on Natural Gas

The Economists deputy news editor, Simon Wright is so good at dismembering jargons that you might even start to care about knowing a little something about natural gas, the subject of his special report that was published this month. In this podcast, Simon gives us a crash course in Shale gas and explains why is it a big deal that America has started to mine more of it in the last few years. He reckons that it may still take a while for developing countries to get their hands on it, but this discovery could lead to some interesting political repercussions in world economy.

17 MIN2012 JUL 23
Comments
A Conversation with Simon Wright of The Economist on Natural Gas

A Conversation with Jon Fasman of The Economist on American Economy, Drugs and Journalism

Jon Fasman knows what it takes to be a New York Times best selling author. His book, Geographer's Library published in 2005 has been released into more than a dozen languages and his more recent novel, The Unpossessed City is a major hit. At The Economist, he covers a diverse range of subjects like food, music, chopsticks, politics, Tiger Woods, Dominique Strauss Kahn, global warming and a lot more. In this podcast, talks about American politics, drugs and Atlanta. Incidentally, Jon was working in a building close to the twin towers on September 11, 2001 and he shares his thoughts about where USA stands today, in the midst of very high unemployment rates and terror strikes. For the ones interested to know more about drugs, skip to the 12th minute to hear this father of two young kids having a refreshingly liberal attitude towards solving the problem of drug abuse which plagues not just America, but many other nations.

22 MIN2011 SEP 15
Comments
A Conversation with Jon Fasman of The Economist on American Economy, Drugs and Journalism

Philip Coggan on his Special Report on Pensions

Philip Coggan, the Capital Markets Editor of The Economist joins us to talk about his special report on Pensions. Things have changed quite a bit since the first pension scheme was introduced by Otto Von Bismarck back in the 19th century. As people in developed countries are living longer, the pressure on the working population is mounting steadily to support the greying economies. In this podcast, Philip suggests different ways to tackle this problem by citing examples of governments which are doing it right and a few others which aren't.

19 MIN2011 MAY 3
Comments
Philip Coggan on his Special Report on Pensions

Lane Greene of The Economist on his book, You are What You Speak

Robert Lane Greene, the International Correspondent of The Economist has released his first book titled, You Are What You Speak. In this podcast, Lane clearly distinguishes the sticklers from the linguists. While he supports those who strive to write and talk by making use of correct grammar, he is against the mindless infatuation with the subject. He also tells us a bit about the process of writing his book while juggling between a day job and learning new languages while at it.

23 MIN2011 APR 7
Comments
Lane Greene of The Economist on his book, You are What You Speak

Point Blank with Nitin Chandrakant Desai

In our film industry, what Amitabh Bachchan or Dilip Kumar is to acting, Nitin Chandrakant Desai is to art direction. The winner of four national awards and many successful movies such as Lagaan, Devdas, Jodha Akbar, Hum Dil Dechuke Sanam, Munnabhai, etc talks about his craft and the challenges of his everyday job. He takes us through his experiece of working with directors like Vidhu Vinod Chopra, Sanjay Leela Bhansai, Danny Boyle and Ashutosh Gowarikar. His job demands him to think on his feet and deliver results in open sets where temperature can soar up to 45 degrees.This podcast charts the journey of the man who once lived in a 10X10 Worli chawl and today is Indias most respected Art Director who still maintains the modesty of a newcomer.

39 MIN2011 APR 5
Comments
Point Blank with Nitin Chandrakant Desai

Kenneth Cukier from The Economist on the Japan crisis from Ground Zero

Kenneth Cukier is Japan Business and Finance correspondent of The Economist, but in the last couple of weeks, Kenn has stared at one of the most grueling assignments of his career. He is covering Japans largest earthquake, visiting disaster zones and making sense of the mayhem. In this podcast, Kenneth who is at ground zero salutes the spirit of the Japanese who are ploughing through the crisis with aplomb. He does not mince words while criticizing the Tokyo Electric Power Company which is at the core of the nuclear reactor crisis.

22 MIN2011 MAR 25
Comments
Kenneth Cukier from The Economist on the Japan crisis from Ground Zero

Prof Kanu Doshi on the Union Budget 2011

Prof Kanu Doshi and his quintessential humour join us by branding this years Union budget as an Accountants budget which is neither beneficial for the khaas aadmi nor the aam aadmi. Kanu bhai takes us through the different benefits that the common man can enjoy until the Direct Tax Code is introduced in the coming year. This podcast decodes jargons like AMT, LLP, DDT and many more. The Finance Minister lay special thrust on infrastructure by alloting more than Rs. 2000 crore for development of roadways, etc. Inviting foreign companies to invest in the infrastructure bonds by increasing the ceiling limit from 5 billion USD to 25 billion USD is one of the highlights of this year's budget and Kanu bhai tells us why.

30 MIN2011 MAR 16
Comments
Prof Kanu Doshi on the Union Budget 2011
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