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ThisWeek Community News: Marching Orders

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ThisWeek Community News: Marching Orders

ThisWeek Community News: Marching Orders

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Central Ohio military veterans, ranging from World War II to the most recent conflicts and battles even in Yemen, share their war stories with ThisWeek Community News host Scott Hummel.

Latest Episodes

Craig Morin of Columbus, Ohio: U.S. Army, Operation Enduring Freedom

Editor’s note: This is the final profile of Marching Orders, season 1. Read previous profiles at ThisWeekNEWS.com/MarchingOrders. Craig Morin, 30, of Columbus was a U.S. Army officer in Afghanistan in 2013 and 2014, advising the Afghan National Army during Operation Enduring Freedom. Morin was born in Cincinnati and grew up in the nearby suburban village of Evendale – what he called “typical suburban life growing up” – as the youngest of three brothers. While growing up during the military deployments of the century’s first decade, Morin said, he developed a “desire to serve and participate in what I thought was going to be the defining event of my generation.” “I was looking for an adventure, and I had a strong desire to do something physical. I wasn’t ready at 22 years old to sit behind a desk,” he said. After attending Princeton High School, he attended Ohio State University, graduating in 2011 with a degree in philosophy, and was commissioned as a second lieutenant th...

37 MIN2019 SEP 7
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Craig Morin of Columbus, Ohio: U.S. Army, Operation Enduring Freedom

Michael Pohorilla of New Albany, Ohio: Army Air Corps, World War II

Michael Pohorilla, 95, of New Albany flew 35 combat missions over German-held territory as a first lieutenant and Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress navigator in World War II. He was based in Great Britain as a member of the U.S. Army Air Corps’ Eighth Air Force. The 10-man crew on his bomber ranged from 18 to 22 years old, “barely out of high school,” he said. “When you’re young, you think you’re invincible. ... Just a few microseconds in combat and you become very, very humble,” he said. “God was my co-pilot, no question about it.” Pohorilla was born in eastern Pennsylvania and graduated from Girard College, a 12-grade school in Philadelphia that had about 1,600 students when he attended. “I got a first-class education there,” he said, consisting of college-preparatory classes in the mornings and vocational classes in the afternoons. The vocational classes covered such topics as carpentry, electrical work and printing. “The philosophy was, when you left the school, you could ...

36 MIN2019 AUG 3
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Michael Pohorilla of New Albany, Ohio: Army Air Corps, World War II

Wally Cash of Hilliard, Ohio: U.S. Navy, World War II

Wally Cash, 93, of Hilliard is among the ever-shrinking ranks of World War II veterans in the United States. Cash spent two years and 10 months in the U.S. Navy and concluded his active service before he was 21 years old. He was a 17-year-old senior at Grandview Heights High School when he enlisted in the Navy in August 1943. He later earned his high school diploma after his military discharge. “My parents encouraged me to (join the military), but when I brought home the papers for them to sign, they didn’t want to, (but) they reluctantly signed,” Cash said. Cash said he was motivated to enlist after hearing stories from some of his classmates who had graduated several years earlier, as well as from neighbors who had returned home after service. “(Grandview Heights was) a close community,” he said. After enlisting, Cash was sent to the Naval Station Great Lakes near Chicago. “The first thing they told us was to shave every day, and I thought, ‘Why do I need to shave? I wasn’...

34 MIN2019 JUN 29
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Wally Cash of Hilliard, Ohio: U.S. Navy, World War II

Edward Taylor III of Pickerington: National Guard, Gulf War

Edward Taylor III, 49, of Pickerington is an Ohio Army National Guard veteran of the 1990-91 Gulf War and served during the 2003-11 Iraq War with the Ohio Air National Guard, for which he still serves as a chief master sergeant. A Canton native, Taylor graduated from McKinley Senior High School and attended the University of Akron and Grantham University. He has been in the Ohio Air National Guard since 1999. He was promoted to senior master sergeant in 2012 and to chief master sergeant in May. He enlisted with the idea of becoming a pilot. “(My) family didn’t have a huge background in the military, ... but I do remember specifically both my grandfathers and my father back in the time, during World War II, black men were stereotyped as having flat feet,” he said. “If you had flat feet, some recruiters did not allow you to get in.” Both his grandfathers wanted to serve but weren’t able to, he said. His father also wanted to enlist but didn’t, he said. “Both my brothers and I – all three of us served, (as did) a couple cousins. ... Not a huge military family, but definitely, it’s been a big part of the Taylor family.” Taylor said he admired the Tuskegee Airmen, African American military pilots who had fought during WWII. He said he had taken an African American studies class at Akron, and he learned about such notable African American military pioneers as Eugene Bullard, a pilot who had served in the French military during World War I because he wasn’t allowed to serve in the U.S. military. He knew of Benjamin O. Davis Jr., a West Point graduate and son of a brigadier general who became the first African American general in the U.S. Air Force. And he was well aware of Daniel “Chappie” James Jr., who became the first African American four-star general in 1975. “Once I became familiar with their names and their stories, (I) definitely became a huge fan of their careers and wanted to emulate them,” he said. He didn’t get his pilot license, but he said he found that he really enjoyed the maintenance side of aviation more. “I enjoyed thoroughly aircraft maintenance,” he said. “I still had the chance to fly, you know, on the aircraft ... which was still a wonderful thing – a huge treat, not something everybody can say that they do. ... Being an 18-, 19-year-old kid learning how to fix and maintain a $60 million aircraft is not something that everybody does every day.” He was an armament mechanic on Bell AH-1 Cobra helicopters during Gulf War operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm in 1990 and 1991. Before shipping out, he said, “I really wasn’t worried because I didn’t know what to expect.” He was on duty with the Air National Guard, working in a hangar, the morning of Sept. 11, 2001. Even before the second plane hit the World Trade Center, Taylor said he and his fellow airmen knew it was a deliberate attack. They knew jet aircraft were equipped with a terrain-collision-avoidance system, which keeps aircraft clear of ground obstacles, and the crash could not have been by chance. “We all kind of stopped in our tracks” to watch the news coverage, he recalled, and one airman said, “That’s it. We’re going to war, boys.” Camaraderie is a necessity for military personnel during a deployment, he said. “We have to foster that camaraderie so that we can make it because we’re all human beings. ... I’ve seen young men get their ‘Dear John’ letters. I’ve seen young ladies who just gave birth two months prior and now they’re (deployed) for six months,” he said. Members of the military get very close, he said, and he knows he always will maintain contact with those he served beside. Taylor served overseas in Bahrain, Qatar, Afghanistan, United Arab Emirates and Turkey. In those countries, he saw happy reunions of the local population at airports and realized “they’re just the same as you and I. ... They’re still human beings with emotion. ... All they want to do is love their people and be left alone, similar to the way a lot of us are.

34 MIN2019 JUN 8
Comments
Edward Taylor III of Pickerington: National Guard, Gulf War

Dana Robinson-Street, Columbus, Ohio: Navy, Gulf War

Dr. Dana Robinson-Street, 50, of Columbus is a 26-year veteran of the U.S. Navy who served on the destroyer tender, USS Samuel Gompers, during the Gulf War of 1991, including the combat phase of Operation Desert Storm. She was inducted into the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame in 2018. Born and raised in Chicago, Robinson-Street was the youngest daughter in a blended family of 13 children, she said. After graduating, she would start jobs and find a reason for disliking them, she said. So she selected the Navy as a job she couldn’t quit, enlisting in 1988. Her father, however, was apprehensive and didn’t want her to join. When she shipped out for Desert Storm aboard the Gompers, “I really didn’t know what to expect or what we would be facing,” she said. “You heard about the tragedies of war. I had family members that had been to war in Vietnam, so honestly, I was very afraid,” she said. “The thought that I left home against my father’s wishes was really something that was becoming...

42 MIN2019 MAY 24
Comments
Dana Robinson-Street, Columbus, Ohio: Navy, Gulf War

Bobbie Mershon of Canal Winchester, Ohio: U.S. Army, Vietnam War

Roberta “Bobbie” Jean Mershon, 71, of Canal Winchester treated some of the most badly wounded soldiers of the Vietnam War after she arrived in the country as a 22-year-old Army nurse in 1969. Those severely injured and burned soldiers typically were 19 or 20 years old, she said. “It was just like, ‘Oh, my God. I just don’t know how they could ... have the strength to want to go on,’ but a lot of these guys did,” she said. “A lot of these guys were just very grateful for everything you did for them and took care of them, even though you knew when you looked at them that their lives were never going to be the same again. Never. There was no way they could be.” A native of Indianapolis, Mershon graduated from high school in 1965. At the time, she said, women had four basic choices for a career – teacher, secretary, hairstylist and nurse. Mershon chose to become a nurse. She was attending St. Vincent School of Nursing in Indianapolis when she learned of an Army program to incr...

41 MIN2019 MAY 3
Comments
Bobbie Mershon of Canal Winchester, Ohio: U.S. Army, Vietnam War

Edward Mechenbier of Columbus: Air Force, Vietnam POW

Vietnam War veteran and retired U.S. Air Force Major Gen. Edward Mechenbier, 76, of Columbus was held as a prisoner of war from 1967 to 1973 in North Vietnam, where he was beaten and tortured but survived on as little as 600 to 800 calories a day. The nearly 600 Americans who survived captivity in North Vietnam “weren’t special. We were just products of the American society,” Mechenbier said. “Some people say, ‘I couldn’t take the torture. I couldn’t take the isolation,’ ” he said. “People always sell themselves short, and they’ll say, ‘Oh, I could never do that.’ Yes, you could. “I mean, you just think about things in everybody’s life. We all face challenges. We all face hardships. We all face things that are going on and we say, ‘Oh, I couldn’t do that.’ “Well, I couldn’t do what I did in my own mind ... but you know, you look around at all the other guys who were in there with you. There were no supermen there. We were just ordinary guys doing our job, and we ...

56 MIN2019 MAR 29
Comments
Edward Mechenbier of Columbus: Air Force, Vietnam POW

Mike Schad of Grove City, Air Force, Korea, Vietnam

Mike Schad, 91, of Grove City is a U.S. Air Force veteran who served during the Berlin Airlift, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. The oldest of 11 children, he grew up and graduated from high school in Plainview, Minnesota, and attended the University of Minnesota for a year. Motivated by a love of airplanes, he said, he joined the Air Force in 1948. He had wanted to become an Air Force pilot but was told, “We’ve got pilots sitting around here with nothing to do from World War II, and we need other people doing other jobs,” he said. Trained as an air-traffic and radar controller, he worked at towers, mobile radar facilities and air-traffic centers during 22 years in the Air Force, typically serving at a base from one to three years before being assigned to a new location. His assignments included Newfoundland and Bermuda, which were refueling stops for aircraft flying to Germany during the Berlin Blockade and Berlin Airlift. The airlift began in June 1948, when the Soviet Union...

40 MIN2019 MAR 16
Comments
Mike Schad of Grove City, Air Force, Korea, Vietnam

Richard and Christine Curry of Pickerington, Ohio: U.S. Army, Global War on Terrorism

Husband and wife Richard T. Curry and Christine Curry of Pickerington are U.S. Army veterans who served in Iraq and Kuwait during the War on Terror. Richard Curry grew up in Cincinnati and attended Youngstown State University, New York University and the American Military University. He earned his master’s degree in military history in December from AMU. He enlisted in 1975 and retired as a colonel. Christine Curry grew up in Logan and Sciotoville, attended Shawnee State University and joined the Army National Guard in 1982. She retired as a sergeant first class. Richard Curry’s first tour to Iraq began in 2004 as commander of a unit in the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. “It was a completeArmy Cavalry Regiment – tanks, Bradley fighting vehicles and Strykers,” he said. It also had artillery units, he said. “We were tasked originally to help out with the elections, and then we were told we were going to go into a major offensive,” he said. That offensive was at Tal Afar, launch...

76 MIN2019 FEB 2
Comments
Richard and Christine Curry of Pickerington, Ohio: U.S. Army, Global War on Terrorism

Mike Strahle of Westerville: U.S. Marines' Lima Company, Iraq War

Mike Strahle, 34, of Westerville served in the Iraq War in 2005 with the Marine Corps' Columbus-based Company L (known as Lima Company), 3rd Battalion, 25th Regiment, as part of Regimental Combat Team 2. Strahle was with the unit when it conducted anti-insurgency operations in Iraq's Al Anbar province along the Syrian border and later helped launch Operation Matador (the Battle of Al Qaim) on May 8, 2005. Strahle returned to the United States with injuries he had sustained when the vehicle he was riding in was hit by a roadside bomb May 11, 2005. He is the executive director of the Eyes of Freedom, a traveling exhibit of portraits, painted by then-Ohio artist Anita Miller, depicting the 22 Marines and one Navy corpsman who died in Iraq with Lima Company. The exhibit also includes a bronze sculpture, "The Silent Battle," which characterizes the struggle of veterans adapting to civilian life. Strahle said he knew those who died in Iraq while serving with Lima. He was born and raised i...

93 MIN2019 FEB 1
Comments
Mike Strahle of Westerville: U.S. Marines' Lima Company, Iraq War

Latest Episodes

Craig Morin of Columbus, Ohio: U.S. Army, Operation Enduring Freedom

Editor’s note: This is the final profile of Marching Orders, season 1. Read previous profiles at ThisWeekNEWS.com/MarchingOrders. Craig Morin, 30, of Columbus was a U.S. Army officer in Afghanistan in 2013 and 2014, advising the Afghan National Army during Operation Enduring Freedom. Morin was born in Cincinnati and grew up in the nearby suburban village of Evendale – what he called “typical suburban life growing up” – as the youngest of three brothers. While growing up during the military deployments of the century’s first decade, Morin said, he developed a “desire to serve and participate in what I thought was going to be the defining event of my generation.” “I was looking for an adventure, and I had a strong desire to do something physical. I wasn’t ready at 22 years old to sit behind a desk,” he said. After attending Princeton High School, he attended Ohio State University, graduating in 2011 with a degree in philosophy, and was commissioned as a second lieutenant th...

37 MIN2019 SEP 7
Comments
Craig Morin of Columbus, Ohio: U.S. Army, Operation Enduring Freedom

Michael Pohorilla of New Albany, Ohio: Army Air Corps, World War II

Michael Pohorilla, 95, of New Albany flew 35 combat missions over German-held territory as a first lieutenant and Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress navigator in World War II. He was based in Great Britain as a member of the U.S. Army Air Corps’ Eighth Air Force. The 10-man crew on his bomber ranged from 18 to 22 years old, “barely out of high school,” he said. “When you’re young, you think you’re invincible. ... Just a few microseconds in combat and you become very, very humble,” he said. “God was my co-pilot, no question about it.” Pohorilla was born in eastern Pennsylvania and graduated from Girard College, a 12-grade school in Philadelphia that had about 1,600 students when he attended. “I got a first-class education there,” he said, consisting of college-preparatory classes in the mornings and vocational classes in the afternoons. The vocational classes covered such topics as carpentry, electrical work and printing. “The philosophy was, when you left the school, you could ...

36 MIN2019 AUG 3
Comments
Michael Pohorilla of New Albany, Ohio: Army Air Corps, World War II

Wally Cash of Hilliard, Ohio: U.S. Navy, World War II

Wally Cash, 93, of Hilliard is among the ever-shrinking ranks of World War II veterans in the United States. Cash spent two years and 10 months in the U.S. Navy and concluded his active service before he was 21 years old. He was a 17-year-old senior at Grandview Heights High School when he enlisted in the Navy in August 1943. He later earned his high school diploma after his military discharge. “My parents encouraged me to (join the military), but when I brought home the papers for them to sign, they didn’t want to, (but) they reluctantly signed,” Cash said. Cash said he was motivated to enlist after hearing stories from some of his classmates who had graduated several years earlier, as well as from neighbors who had returned home after service. “(Grandview Heights was) a close community,” he said. After enlisting, Cash was sent to the Naval Station Great Lakes near Chicago. “The first thing they told us was to shave every day, and I thought, ‘Why do I need to shave? I wasn’...

34 MIN2019 JUN 29
Comments
Wally Cash of Hilliard, Ohio: U.S. Navy, World War II

Edward Taylor III of Pickerington: National Guard, Gulf War

Edward Taylor III, 49, of Pickerington is an Ohio Army National Guard veteran of the 1990-91 Gulf War and served during the 2003-11 Iraq War with the Ohio Air National Guard, for which he still serves as a chief master sergeant. A Canton native, Taylor graduated from McKinley Senior High School and attended the University of Akron and Grantham University. He has been in the Ohio Air National Guard since 1999. He was promoted to senior master sergeant in 2012 and to chief master sergeant in May. He enlisted with the idea of becoming a pilot. “(My) family didn’t have a huge background in the military, ... but I do remember specifically both my grandfathers and my father back in the time, during World War II, black men were stereotyped as having flat feet,” he said. “If you had flat feet, some recruiters did not allow you to get in.” Both his grandfathers wanted to serve but weren’t able to, he said. His father also wanted to enlist but didn’t, he said. “Both my brothers and I – all three of us served, (as did) a couple cousins. ... Not a huge military family, but definitely, it’s been a big part of the Taylor family.” Taylor said he admired the Tuskegee Airmen, African American military pilots who had fought during WWII. He said he had taken an African American studies class at Akron, and he learned about such notable African American military pioneers as Eugene Bullard, a pilot who had served in the French military during World War I because he wasn’t allowed to serve in the U.S. military. He knew of Benjamin O. Davis Jr., a West Point graduate and son of a brigadier general who became the first African American general in the U.S. Air Force. And he was well aware of Daniel “Chappie” James Jr., who became the first African American four-star general in 1975. “Once I became familiar with their names and their stories, (I) definitely became a huge fan of their careers and wanted to emulate them,” he said. He didn’t get his pilot license, but he said he found that he really enjoyed the maintenance side of aviation more. “I enjoyed thoroughly aircraft maintenance,” he said. “I still had the chance to fly, you know, on the aircraft ... which was still a wonderful thing – a huge treat, not something everybody can say that they do. ... Being an 18-, 19-year-old kid learning how to fix and maintain a $60 million aircraft is not something that everybody does every day.” He was an armament mechanic on Bell AH-1 Cobra helicopters during Gulf War operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm in 1990 and 1991. Before shipping out, he said, “I really wasn’t worried because I didn’t know what to expect.” He was on duty with the Air National Guard, working in a hangar, the morning of Sept. 11, 2001. Even before the second plane hit the World Trade Center, Taylor said he and his fellow airmen knew it was a deliberate attack. They knew jet aircraft were equipped with a terrain-collision-avoidance system, which keeps aircraft clear of ground obstacles, and the crash could not have been by chance. “We all kind of stopped in our tracks” to watch the news coverage, he recalled, and one airman said, “That’s it. We’re going to war, boys.” Camaraderie is a necessity for military personnel during a deployment, he said. “We have to foster that camaraderie so that we can make it because we’re all human beings. ... I’ve seen young men get their ‘Dear John’ letters. I’ve seen young ladies who just gave birth two months prior and now they’re (deployed) for six months,” he said. Members of the military get very close, he said, and he knows he always will maintain contact with those he served beside. Taylor served overseas in Bahrain, Qatar, Afghanistan, United Arab Emirates and Turkey. In those countries, he saw happy reunions of the local population at airports and realized “they’re just the same as you and I. ... They’re still human beings with emotion. ... All they want to do is love their people and be left alone, similar to the way a lot of us are.

34 MIN2019 JUN 8
Comments
Edward Taylor III of Pickerington: National Guard, Gulf War

Dana Robinson-Street, Columbus, Ohio: Navy, Gulf War

Dr. Dana Robinson-Street, 50, of Columbus is a 26-year veteran of the U.S. Navy who served on the destroyer tender, USS Samuel Gompers, during the Gulf War of 1991, including the combat phase of Operation Desert Storm. She was inducted into the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame in 2018. Born and raised in Chicago, Robinson-Street was the youngest daughter in a blended family of 13 children, she said. After graduating, she would start jobs and find a reason for disliking them, she said. So she selected the Navy as a job she couldn’t quit, enlisting in 1988. Her father, however, was apprehensive and didn’t want her to join. When she shipped out for Desert Storm aboard the Gompers, “I really didn’t know what to expect or what we would be facing,” she said. “You heard about the tragedies of war. I had family members that had been to war in Vietnam, so honestly, I was very afraid,” she said. “The thought that I left home against my father’s wishes was really something that was becoming...

42 MIN2019 MAY 24
Comments
Dana Robinson-Street, Columbus, Ohio: Navy, Gulf War

Bobbie Mershon of Canal Winchester, Ohio: U.S. Army, Vietnam War

Roberta “Bobbie” Jean Mershon, 71, of Canal Winchester treated some of the most badly wounded soldiers of the Vietnam War after she arrived in the country as a 22-year-old Army nurse in 1969. Those severely injured and burned soldiers typically were 19 or 20 years old, she said. “It was just like, ‘Oh, my God. I just don’t know how they could ... have the strength to want to go on,’ but a lot of these guys did,” she said. “A lot of these guys were just very grateful for everything you did for them and took care of them, even though you knew when you looked at them that their lives were never going to be the same again. Never. There was no way they could be.” A native of Indianapolis, Mershon graduated from high school in 1965. At the time, she said, women had four basic choices for a career – teacher, secretary, hairstylist and nurse. Mershon chose to become a nurse. She was attending St. Vincent School of Nursing in Indianapolis when she learned of an Army program to incr...

41 MIN2019 MAY 3
Comments
Bobbie Mershon of Canal Winchester, Ohio: U.S. Army, Vietnam War

Edward Mechenbier of Columbus: Air Force, Vietnam POW

Vietnam War veteran and retired U.S. Air Force Major Gen. Edward Mechenbier, 76, of Columbus was held as a prisoner of war from 1967 to 1973 in North Vietnam, where he was beaten and tortured but survived on as little as 600 to 800 calories a day. The nearly 600 Americans who survived captivity in North Vietnam “weren’t special. We were just products of the American society,” Mechenbier said. “Some people say, ‘I couldn’t take the torture. I couldn’t take the isolation,’ ” he said. “People always sell themselves short, and they’ll say, ‘Oh, I could never do that.’ Yes, you could. “I mean, you just think about things in everybody’s life. We all face challenges. We all face hardships. We all face things that are going on and we say, ‘Oh, I couldn’t do that.’ “Well, I couldn’t do what I did in my own mind ... but you know, you look around at all the other guys who were in there with you. There were no supermen there. We were just ordinary guys doing our job, and we ...

56 MIN2019 MAR 29
Comments
Edward Mechenbier of Columbus: Air Force, Vietnam POW

Mike Schad of Grove City, Air Force, Korea, Vietnam

Mike Schad, 91, of Grove City is a U.S. Air Force veteran who served during the Berlin Airlift, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. The oldest of 11 children, he grew up and graduated from high school in Plainview, Minnesota, and attended the University of Minnesota for a year. Motivated by a love of airplanes, he said, he joined the Air Force in 1948. He had wanted to become an Air Force pilot but was told, “We’ve got pilots sitting around here with nothing to do from World War II, and we need other people doing other jobs,” he said. Trained as an air-traffic and radar controller, he worked at towers, mobile radar facilities and air-traffic centers during 22 years in the Air Force, typically serving at a base from one to three years before being assigned to a new location. His assignments included Newfoundland and Bermuda, which were refueling stops for aircraft flying to Germany during the Berlin Blockade and Berlin Airlift. The airlift began in June 1948, when the Soviet Union...

40 MIN2019 MAR 16
Comments
Mike Schad of Grove City, Air Force, Korea, Vietnam

Richard and Christine Curry of Pickerington, Ohio: U.S. Army, Global War on Terrorism

Husband and wife Richard T. Curry and Christine Curry of Pickerington are U.S. Army veterans who served in Iraq and Kuwait during the War on Terror. Richard Curry grew up in Cincinnati and attended Youngstown State University, New York University and the American Military University. He earned his master’s degree in military history in December from AMU. He enlisted in 1975 and retired as a colonel. Christine Curry grew up in Logan and Sciotoville, attended Shawnee State University and joined the Army National Guard in 1982. She retired as a sergeant first class. Richard Curry’s first tour to Iraq began in 2004 as commander of a unit in the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. “It was a completeArmy Cavalry Regiment – tanks, Bradley fighting vehicles and Strykers,” he said. It also had artillery units, he said. “We were tasked originally to help out with the elections, and then we were told we were going to go into a major offensive,” he said. That offensive was at Tal Afar, launch...

76 MIN2019 FEB 2
Comments
Richard and Christine Curry of Pickerington, Ohio: U.S. Army, Global War on Terrorism

Mike Strahle of Westerville: U.S. Marines' Lima Company, Iraq War

Mike Strahle, 34, of Westerville served in the Iraq War in 2005 with the Marine Corps' Columbus-based Company L (known as Lima Company), 3rd Battalion, 25th Regiment, as part of Regimental Combat Team 2. Strahle was with the unit when it conducted anti-insurgency operations in Iraq's Al Anbar province along the Syrian border and later helped launch Operation Matador (the Battle of Al Qaim) on May 8, 2005. Strahle returned to the United States with injuries he had sustained when the vehicle he was riding in was hit by a roadside bomb May 11, 2005. He is the executive director of the Eyes of Freedom, a traveling exhibit of portraits, painted by then-Ohio artist Anita Miller, depicting the 22 Marines and one Navy corpsman who died in Iraq with Lima Company. The exhibit also includes a bronze sculpture, "The Silent Battle," which characterizes the struggle of veterans adapting to civilian life. Strahle said he knew those who died in Iraq while serving with Lima. He was born and raised i...

93 MIN2019 FEB 1
Comments
Mike Strahle of Westerville: U.S. Marines' Lima Company, Iraq War
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